Catalogue


Charles Lamb, Coleridge and Wordsworth : reading friendship in the 1790s /
Felicity James.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire [England] ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, c2008.
description
xiii, 265 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0230545246 (hbk.), 9780230545243 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire [England] ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, c2008.
isbn
0230545246 (hbk.)
9780230545243 (hbk.)
catalogue key
6762431
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[A] welcome reassessment of Charles Lamb's career... very engaging." --Jon Mee, University of Warwick
"[A] welcome reassessment of Charles Lamb's career... very engaging." Jon Mee, University of Warwick
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This book makes the case for a& re-placing of Lamb as reader, writer and friend in the midst of the lively political and literary scene of the 1790s. Reading his little-known early works alongside& others by the likes of& Coleridge and Wordsworth, it& allows a& revealing insight into the creative dynamics of early Romanticism.
Main Description
This book makes the case for a re-placing of Lamb as reader, writer and friend in the midst of the lively political and literary scene of the 1790s. Reading his little-known early works alongside others by the likes of Coleridge and Wordsworth, it allows a revealing insight into the creative dynamics of early Romanticism.
Description for Bookstore
This book re-places Lamb - as reader, writer and friend - in the lively political and literary scene of the 1790s
Long Description
From the raucous world of the Anti-Jacobin cartoon to lively conversations with Coleridge in the 'Salutation and Cat', Charles Lamb is right in the midst of the literary sociability of the 1790s - yet his part in the friendships, political networks and creative dialogues of the period has been overlooked. Arguing for a reconsideration of Lamb's early Unitarianism and allegiances to radical dissent, James explores his exciting and varied works of the 1790s against a backdrop of social and political change. From playful forgeries and hoaxes to poignant family dramas and combative, vigorous, urban interpretations of Wordsworth, Lamb re-reads and re-writes many of the well-known narratives of Romanticism. Placing his little-known early works alongside Coleridge's 'conversation poems' , Lyrical Ballads, The Borderers and The Ruined Cottage , this book uncovers the creative dynamics and the sociable conversations of early Romanticism. Moreover, understanding Lamb as writer, reader and friend gives us a valuable insight into how to read friendship itself in the 1790s.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work repositions Lamb - as reader, writer and friend - within the lively political and literary scene of the 1790s. Felicity James gives attention to allusive practices of the time and the development of the essay as a genre, and also discusses how Lamb's friendships with key Romantic writers affected their works.
Table of Contents
List of Abbreviationsp. viii
Acknowledgementsp. xi
Permissionsp. xiii
Introduction: Placing Lambp. 1
Idealising Friendship
Frendotatoi meta frendous: Constructing Friendship in the 1790sp. 13
December 1794p. 13
'Bowles, Priestley, Burke': The Morning Chronicle sonnetsp. 18
New readings of familial and friendly affectionp. 24
Pantisocracy and the 'family of soul'p. 26
Unitarian readings of friendshipp. 30
Sensibility and benevolencep. 34
Reading David Hartleyp. 39
Readings of feeling in Coleridge and Lambp. 43
Lamb's sensibilities: two early sonnetsp. 47
Rewritings of Friendship, 1796-1797p. 55
Spring 1796p. 55
Coleridge's rewritings of Lambp. 56
Trapped in the Bower: Coleridgean reflections in retirementp. 62
'Ears of Sympathy': Lamb's sympathetic responsep. 71
Rewritings of Coleridgep. 74
Doubting Friendship
The 'Day of Horrors'p. 83
September 1796p. 83
Aftermathp. 85
Reconstructing the poetry of familial affectionp. 91
Nether Stowey: 'an Elysium upon earth'?p. 96
'Cold, Cold, Cold': Loneliness and Reproachp. 101
June 1797p. 101
'Gloomy boughs' and sunny leaves: the Wordsworth-Coleridge conversationp. 103
Visions of unity: This Lime-tree Bower my Prisonp. 105
The Overcoat and the Manchineel: Lamb's responsep. 111
The 'Reft House' of the 'Nehemiah Higginbottom' sonnetsp. 114
Blank Verse and Fears in Solitudep. 120
February 1798p. 120
Blank Verse and Lyrical Balladsp. 125
Midnight reproachp. 130
'Living without God in the World'p. 134
Edmund Oliver: forging a 'common identity'p. 136
Coleridge and the 'lying Angel'p. 139
Reconstructing Friendship
A Text of Friendship: Rosamund Grayp. 145
Spring 1798p. 145
Anxieties of friendship: letters to Robert Lloydp. 146
'Inscribed in friendship': the sensibility of Rosamund Grayp. 149
The novel's family loyaltiesp. 152
Rosamund Gray and The Ruined Cottagep. 155
Communities of feeling in Rosamund Grayp. 163
Sympathy, Allusion, and Experiment in John Woodvilp. 167
Late 1798p. 167
Redemptive family narrativesp. 169
Elian identificationsp. 173
Forgeries and medleys: Lamb's imitations of Burtonp. 176
'Friend Lamb': John Woodvil and its readersp. 177
Reading and resistance: 'What is Jacobinism?'p. 180
The Urban Romantic: Lamb's Landscapes of Affectionp. 185
Early 1801p. 185
Reading Lyrical Ballads (1800)p. 188
Lamb's Wordsworthian attachmentsp. 195
The voice of the 'Londoner'p. 200
'The greatest egotist of all': some Elian sympathiesp. 203
Wordsworth's readings of Lambp. 210
Lamb's afterlivesp. 211
Notesp. 215
Bibliographyp. 240
Indexp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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