Catalogue

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Aristocratic women and the literary nation, 1832-1867 /
Muireann O'Cinneide.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
description
vii, 241 p.
ISBN
0230546706, 9780230546707 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
isbn
0230546706
9780230546707 (alk. paper)
contents note
Part I: Class and authorship -- Aristocratic lives: life-writing, class and authority -- Dilettantes and dandies: authorship and the silver fork novel -- Silly novels and lady novelists: inside the literary marketplace -- Part II: Writing the nation state -- Wrongs make rebels: polemical voices -- The spectacle of fiction: self, society and the novel -- Affairs of state: aristocratic women and the politics of influence -- Conclusion: 1867 and beyond.
catalogue key
6760162
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[This] book will be of interest to both feminists and historians of the novel." Miriam Elizabeth Burstein, College at Brockport, SUNY
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book considers the importance of aristocratic women and their writing to mid-Victorian discourses on the nature of gendered power structures, political influence and social hierarchies
Long Description
Aristocratic Women and the Literary Nation, 1832-1867 offers a literary complement to recent historians' emphasis upon the cultural visibility and significance of the British aristocracy during the Victorian period. Aristocratic women benefited from a leisured model of socialised dilettante interaction that allowed them both to maintain and to market their high social status through their writing, but this model could prove a liability in attempts at serious social and/or intellectual engagement. Instead, these women became targets for critiques aimed at defining certain forms of individual and national identity, even as they themselves adapted to changing value schemes. Aristocratic women's writing therefore offers an important literary and cultural trope through which to consider gendered models of influence, elite identities, the nature of politics, private and public spheres, marriage, professional identities, literary hierarchies, imperial experiences, and ultimately the ongoing representation of the nation state between the Reform Bills of 1832 and 1867.
Main Description
Aristocratic women flourished in the Victorian literary world, their combination of class privilege and gendered exclusion generating distinctively socialized modes of participation in cultural and political activity. Their writing offers an important trope through which to consider the nature of political, private and public spheres. This book is an examination of the literary, social, and political significance of the lives and writings of aristocratic women in the mid-Victorian period.
Main Description
Aristocratic women flourished in the Victorian literary world, their combination of class privilege and gendered exclusion generating distinctively socialized modes of participation in cultural and political activity. Their writing offers an& important trope through which to consider the nature of political, private and public spheres. This book is an examination of the literary, social, and political significance of the lives and writings of aristocratic women in the mid-Victorian period.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vi
Introductionp. 1
Class and Authorship
Aristocratic Lives: Life-Writing, Class and Authorityp. 23
Dilettantes and Dandies: Authorship and the Silver Fork Novelp. 46
Silly Novels and Lady Novelists: Inside the Literary Marketplacep. 63
Writing the Nation State
Wrongs Make Rebels: Polemical Voicesp. 93
The Spectacle of Fiction: Self, Society and the Novelp. 129
Affairs of State: Aristocratic Women and the Politics of Influencep. 153
Conclusion: 1867 and Beyondp. 180
Notesp. 184
Works Citedp. 211
Indexp. 231
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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