Catalogue


Musing with Confucius and Paul : toward a Chinese Christian theology /
K.K. Yeo ; [foreword by Vincent Shen].
imprint
Eugene, Or. : Cascade Books, c2008.
description
xxviii, 480 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1556354886 (pbk.), 9781556354885 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Eugene, Or. : Cascade Books, c2008.
isbn
1556354886 (pbk.)
9781556354885 (pbk.)
contents note
Overture: Identifying with the life-world of Confucius and Paul -- The textual worlds of the Analects and the letter to the Galatians -- Theological ethics in a world of violence -- Li and law, yue and music in a world of ritual and harmony -- To be human and to be holy in the New World : to be the people of God -- Free to be human in a world of difference -- Zhongshu (loyalty-empathy), xin (trust), and pistis (faith) in a world of fear -- Epilogue: Implications for the moral and theological identities of Chinese Christians today.
catalogue key
6759654
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 433-450) and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
K. K. Yeo is Harry R. Kendall Professor of New Testament at Garrett-Evangelical Seminary, an advisory faculty member of the Graduate School of Northwestern University, and a Visiting Professor of Peking University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-01-01:
Like almost all theology, this work by Yeo (Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary) is embedded in the author's own autobiographical struggle. In Yeo's case, this means his personal attempt to explain what it means to be both Chinese and Christian. Born in Malaysia and a convert to Christianity, Yeo explains that he was troubled initially by the Bible's particularity, limited as it was to ancient Middle Eastern cultures. In many ways, this book is his attempt to universalize the Bible's message through an intertextual reading of The Letter of Paul to the Galatians and The Analects of Confucius. Rather than being tied directly to these texts, Yeo focuses on various concepts derived from them, turning them this way and that to see how they might fit together. His concern throughout is with the fusion of theology and ethics, and with trying to maintain a Confucian "fluidity between them." His understanding of ethics also moves back and forth from more personal to more public. A lengthy epilogue explores the implications of the work for "the moral and theological identities of Chinese Christians today." Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals/practitioners. D. Jacobsen Messiah College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Yeo's intriguing volume is a manifesto or apologia for Chinese Christians. It seeks to articulate how it is possible to maintain a Chinese identity and a Christian identity at the same time without capitulating to some Western or other cultural model of Christian identity. To be a Chinese Christian is to adopt a distinctive, unique identity that owes much to both traditions but is sui generis. Providing great resources for the construction of a Chinese Christian theology, Confucius and Paul converge across a surprisingly broad front. Yet, the Christ of the Cross completes or extends what is merely implicit or absent in Confucius; and Confucius amplifies various elements of Christian faith (e.g., community, virtues) that are underplayed in Western Christianity. The Christ of God as found in Paul's letter to the Galatians brings Confucian ethics in the Analects to its fulfillment while simultaneously protecting the church from the aberrations of Chinese history and protecting China against the aberrations of Christian history in the West. Chinese Christianity has something to offer the church that needs to be heard. China can develop its distinctive vision of Christianity for the sake of the church universal. Chinese Christianity will fulfill its global mission if it can find its own authentic Chinese-Christian identity. Insofar as that identity brings the best of the Confucian tradition into the Christian story, it will help revitalize global Christianity. Book jacket.
Main Description
The book is a manifesto or apologia for Chinese Christians. It seeks to articulate how it is possible to maintain a Chinese identity and a Christian identity at the same time without capitulating to some western or other cultural model of Christian identity. To be a Chinese Christian is to adopt a distinctive, unique identity that owes much to both traditions but is sui generis. Providing great resources for the construction of a Chinese Christian theology, Confucius and Paul converge across a surprisingly broad front. Yet, the Christ of the Cross completes or extends what is merely implicit or absent in Confucius; and Confucius amplifies various elements of Christian faith (e.g., community, virtues) that are underplayed in western Christianity. The Christ of God as found in Paul's letter to the Galatians brings Confucian ethics in the Analects to its fulfillment while protecting the church from the aberrations of Chinese history and while protecting China against the aberrations of Christian history in the west. Chinese Christianity has something to give the church that needs to be heard. China can develop its distinctive vision of Christianity for the sake of the church universal. Chinese Christianity will have its global mission if it can find its own authentic Chinese-Christian identity. Insofar as that identity brings the best of the Confucian tradition into the Christian story, it will help revivify global Christianity.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. ix
Prefacep. xv
Abbreviationsp. xxvi
Overture: Identifying with the Life-World of Confucius and Paulp. 1
The Textual Worlds of the Analects and the Letter to the Galatiansp. 53
Theological Ethics in a World of Violencep. 110
Li and Law, Yue and Music in a World of Ritual and Harmonyp. 177
To Be Human and To Be Holy in the New World-To Be the People of Godp. 253
Free to Be Human in a World of Differencep. 304
Zhongshu (Loyalty-Empathy), Xin (Trust), and Pistis (Faith) in a World of Fearp. 355
Epilogue: Implications for the Moral and Theological Identities of Chinese Christians Todayp. 402
Bibliographyp. 433
Index of Subjectsp. 451
Index of Modern Authorsp. 462
Index of Ancient Textsp. 466
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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