Catalogue


Inventing futurism : the art and politics of artificial optimism /
Christine Poggi.
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2009.
description
xv, 374 p.
ISBN
0691133700 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780691133706 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2009.
isbn
0691133700 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780691133706 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Futurist velocities -- Folla/follia: futurism and the crowd -- Umberto Boccioni's The city rises: picturing the futurist metropolis -- Photogenic abstraction: Giacomo Balla's iridescent interpenetrations -- Dreams of metallized flesh: futurism and the masculine body -- Futurist love, luxury, and lust -- Return of the repressed: vicissitudes of the futurist machine -- Aesthetics under fascism.
catalogue key
6759207
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Christine Poggis Inventing Futurism cuts a sharp cross-disciplinary swath through the founding avant-garde of the twentieth century. With meticulous scholarship, interpretive depth, and attention to nuance, it brilliantly upends the once-standard clichs regarding a Futurism reducible to the acritical worship of modernity."-- Jeffrey T. Schnapp, Stanford University "The best book on Futurism that I have read in some time. Inventing Futurism is the first critical study in English to consider Futurism from an interdisciplinary perspective. Poggi brings a new and stimulating perspective to such issues as violence and the representation of women, showing that Futurist practice was much more contradictory than its official rhetoric. This is a truly first-rate and original contribution."-- Luca Somigli, University of Toronto "A very significant contribution to the field. Poggi demonstrates in her well-written and cogently argued book that the traditional interpretation of Futurism as a nave celebration of the shocks and traumas of modernity is in need of revision. It is refreshing to finally see this understudied group of works and artists get the fine-grained attention they deserve."-- Anthony White, University of Melbourne
Flap Copy
"Christine Poggi'sInventing Futurismcuts a sharp cross-disciplinary swath through the founding avant-garde of the twentieth century. With meticulous scholarship, interpretive depth, and attention to nuance, it brilliantly upends the once-standard clichÉs regarding a Futurism reducible to the acritical worship of modernity."--Jeffrey T. Schnapp, Stanford University"The best book on Futurism that I have read in some time.Inventing Futurismis the first critical study in English to consider Futurism from an interdisciplinary perspective. Poggi brings a new and stimulating perspective to such issues as violence and the representation of women, showing that Futurist practice was much more contradictory than its official rhetoric. This is a truly first-rate and original contribution."--Luca Somigli, University of Toronto"A very significant contribution to the field. Poggi demonstrates in her well-written and cogently argued book that the traditional interpretation of Futurism as a naÏve celebration of the shocks and traumas of modernity is in need of revision. It is refreshing to finally see this understudied group of works and artists get the fine-grained attention they deserve."--Anthony White, University of Melbourne
Flap Copy
"Christine Poggi'sInventing Futurismcuts a sharp cross-disciplinary swath through the founding avant-garde of the twentieth century. With meticulous scholarship, interpretive depth, and attention to nuance, it brilliantly upends the once-standard clichés regarding a Futurism reducible to the acritical worship of modernity."--Jeffrey T. Schnapp, Stanford University "The best book on Futurism that I have read in some time.Inventing Futurismis the first critical study in English to consider Futurism from an interdisciplinary perspective. Poggi brings a new and stimulating perspective to such issues as violence and the representation of women, showing that Futurist practice was much more contradictory than its official rhetoric. This is a truly first-rate and original contribution."--Luca Somigli, University of Toronto "A very significant contribution to the field. Poggi demonstrates in her well-written and cogently argued book that the traditional interpretation of Futurism as a naïve celebration of the shocks and traumas of modernity is in need of revision. It is refreshing to finally see this understudied group of works and artists get the fine-grained attention they deserve."--Anthony White, University of Melbourne
Flap Copy
"Christine Poggi's Inventing Futurism cuts a sharp cross-disciplinary swath through the founding avant-garde of the twentieth century. With meticulous scholarship, interpretive depth, and attention to nuance, it brilliantly upends the once-standard clichés regarding a Futurism reducible to the acritical worship of modernity."--Jeffrey T. Schnapp, Stanford University "The best book on Futurism that I have read in some time. Inventing Futurism is the first critical study in English to consider Futurism from an interdisciplinary perspective. Poggi brings a new and stimulating perspective to such issues as violence and the representation of women, showing that Futurist practice was much more contradictory than its official rhetoric. This is a truly first-rate and original contribution."--Luca Somigli, University of Toronto "A very significant contribution to the field. Poggi demonstrates in her well-written and cogently argued book that the traditional interpretation of Futurism as a naïve celebration of the shocks and traumas of modernity is in need of revision. It is refreshing to finally see this understudied group of works and artists get the fine-grained attention they deserve."--Anthony White, University of Melbourne
Flap Copy
"Christine Poggi's Inventing Futurism cuts a sharp cross-disciplinary swath through the founding avant-garde of the twentieth century. With meticulous scholarship, interpretive depth, and attention to nuance, it brilliantly upends the once-standard clich s regarding a Futurism reducible to the acritical worship of modernity."--Jeffrey T. Schnapp, Stanford University "The best book on Futurism that I have read in some time. Inventing Futurism is the first critical study in English to consider Futurism from an interdisciplinary perspective. Poggi brings a new and stimulating perspective to such issues as violence and the representation of women, showing that Futurist practice was much more contradictory than its official rhetoric. This is a truly first-rate and original contribution."--Luca Somigli, University of Toronto "A very significant contribution to the field. Poggi demonstrates in her well-written and cogently argued book that the traditional interpretation of Futurism as a na ve celebration of the shocks and traumas of modernity is in need of revision. It is refreshing to finally see this understudied group of works and artists get the fine-grained attention they deserve."--Anthony White, University of Melbourne
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-10-01:
The phrase "artificial optimism" in the subtitle of this study hints at the inherent contradictions of an artistic style based on polemical theorizing, which is the traditional understanding of futurism. Poggi (Univ. of Pennsylvania) acknowledges the influential and strident voice of F. T. Marinetti, the founder of futurism, but she moves beyond the poet-impresario's rhetoric in her examination of the individual artistic struggles of the major futurist painters with the primary themes of Marinetti's public manifestos. Poggi explores key subjects that appealed to the futurists by examining major futurist works that deal with such early-20th-century concepts as the exhilaration of speed, the mass behavior of the crowd, the projection of individual personality traits onto machines, and other themes that still motivate a century later. By relating studies and journal entries to popular intellectual currents, the author reveals the simultaneous fascination and apprehension experienced by these artists as they encountered and contemplated these strange new experiences at the beginning of the modern era. In this respect the individual artists are revealed as thoughtful, sensitive creators rather than foot soldiers in a modernist campaign, and futurism is revealed as a more serious artistic endeavor. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-level undergraduates through faculty/researchers. W. S. Bradley Mesa State College
Reviews
Review Quotes
The best book on Futurism that I have read in some time.Inventing Futurismis the first critical study in English to consider Futurism from an interdisciplinary perspective. Poggi brings a new and stimulating perspective to such issues as violence and the representation of women, showing that Futurist practice was much more contradictory than its official rhetoric. This is a truly first-rate and original contribution.
A very significant contribution to the field. Poggi demonstrates in her well-written and cogently argued book that the traditional interpretation of Futurism as a naïve celebration of the shocks and traumas of modernity is in need of revision. It is refreshing to finally see this understudied group of works and artists get the fine-grained attention they deserve.
Christine Poggi'sInventing Futurismcuts a sharp cross-disciplinary swath through the founding avant-garde of the twentieth century. With meticulous scholarship, interpretive depth, and attention to nuance, it brilliantly upends the once-standard clichÉs regarding a Futurism reducible to the acritical worship of modernity.
Poggi's analyses of some of Boccioni's and Balla's works . . . have been developed here to a level of great sophistication and can be thoroughly recommended. I also found some of her observations on works by the lesser-known Fill a quite pertinent. -- Gunter Berghaus, Modern Language Review
Poggi's analyses of some of Boccioni's and Balla's works . . . have been developed here to a level of great sophistication and can be thoroughly recommended. I also found some of her observations on works by the lesser-known Fillìa quite pertinent. -- Gunter Berghaus, Modern Language Review
[T]he book's important contribution to the field [is] most notably its close readings of particular works. The prodigious application of primary documents (many of them previously unpublished or unaddressed in any detail) to illuminate specific images and objects, is sustained throughout with impressive pertinence. . . . Poggi's account is a new way of considering works that have become, in spite of their author's most earnest intentions, old. . . .Inventing Futurismmakes an intelligent case for taking seriously that optimistic alchemy, one that consistently wrought the vacillations of ambivalence into an aesthetics of decision.
[T]he book's important contribution to the field [is] most notably its close readings of particular works. The prodigious application of primary documents (many of them previously unpublished or unaddressed in any detail) to illuminate specific images and objects, is sustained throughout with impressive pertinence. . . . Poggi's account is a new way of considering works that have become, in spite of their author's most earnest intentions, old. . . . Inventing Futurism makes an intelligent case for taking seriously that optimistic alchemy, one that consistently wrought the vacillations of ambivalence into an aesthetics of decision. -- Ara H. Merjian, European Legacy
"Poggi's analyses of some of Boccioni's and Balla's works . . . have been developed here to a level of great sophistication and can be thoroughly recommended. I also found some of her observations on works by the lesser-known Filla quite pertinent."-- Gunter Berghaus, Modern Language Review
Poggi's analyses of some of Boccioni's and Balla's works . . . have been developed here to a level of great sophistication and can be thoroughly recommended. I also found some of her observations on works by the lesser-known Fillìa quite pertinent.
In Inventing Futurism , art historian Christine Poggi describes how the Futurist movement's raw passion for technology was moulded by the atmosphere of political foreboding of the times. . . . The visions and concerns of the Futurists, Poggi tells us in this . . . always illuminating study, emerged out of the uncertainty and confusion produced by modernity. -- Ziauddin Sardar, Nature
InInventing Futurism, art historian Christine Poggi describes how the Futurist movement's raw passion for technology was moulded by the atmosphere of political foreboding of the times. . . . The visions and concerns of the Futurists, Poggi tells us in this . . . always illuminating study, emerged out of the uncertainty and confusion produced by modernity. -- Ziauddin Sardar, Nature
Co-Winner of the 2010 Howard R. Marraro Prize, Modern Language Association
In Inventing Futurism , art historian Christine Poggi describes how the Futurist movement's raw passion for technology was moulded by the atmosphere of political foreboding of the times. . . . The visions and concerns of the Futurists, Poggi tells us in this . . . always illuminating study, emerged out of the uncertainty and confusion produced by modernity.
InInventing Futurism, art historian Christine Poggi describes how the Futurist movement's raw passion for technology was moulded by the atmosphere of political foreboding of the times. . . . The visions and concerns of the Futurists, Poggi tells us in this . . . always illuminating study, emerged out of the uncertainty and confusion produced by modernity.
"In Inventing Futurism , art historian Christine Poggi describes how the Futurist movement's raw passion for technology was moulded by the atmosphere of political foreboding of the times. . . . The visions and concerns of the Futurists, Poggi tells us in this . . . always illuminating study, emerged out of the uncertainty and confusion produced by modernity."-- Ziauddin Sardar, Nature
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
In 1909 the poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti published the founding manifesto of Italian Futurism, an inflammatory celebration of "the love of danger" and "the beauty of speed" that provoked readers to take aggressive action and "glorify war--the world's only hygiene." Marinetti's words unleashed an influential artistic and political movement that has since been neglected owing to its exaltation of violence and nationalism, its overt manipulation of mass media channels, and its associations with Fascism.Inventing Futurismis a major reassessment of Futurism that reintegrates it into the history of twentieth-century avant-garde artistic movements.Countering the standard view of Futurism as naÏvely bellicose, Christine Poggi argues that Futurist artists and writers were far more ambivalent in their responses to the shocks of industrial modernity than Marinetti's incendiary pronouncements would suggest. She closely examines Futurist literature, art, and politics within the broader context of Italian social history, revealing a surprisingly powerful undercurrent of anxiety among the Futurists--toward the accelerated rhythms of urban life, the rising influence of the masses, changing gender roles, and the destructiveness of war. Poggi traces the movement from its explosive beginnings through its transformations under Fascism to offer completely new insights into familiar Futurist themes, such as the thrill and trauma of velocity, the psychology of urban crowds, and the fantasy of flesh fused with metal, among others.Lavishly illustrated and unparalleled in scope,Inventing Futurismdemonstrates that beneath Futurism's belligerent avant-garde posturing lay complex and contradictory attitudes toward an always-deferred utopian future.
Main Description
In 1909 the poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti published the founding manifesto of Italian Futurism, an inflammatory celebration of "the love of danger" and "the beauty of speed" that provoked readers to take aggressive action and "glorify war--the world's only hygiene." Marinetti's words unleashed an influential artistic and political movement that has since been neglected owing to its exaltation of violence and nationalism, its overt manipulation of mass media channels, and its associations with Fascism. Inventing Futurism is a major reassessment of Futurism that reintegrates it into the history of twentieth-century avant-garde artistic movements. Countering the standard view of Futurism as naïvely bellicose, Christine Poggi argues that Futurist artists and writers were far more ambivalent in their responses to the shocks of industrial modernity than Marinetti's incendiary pronouncements would suggest. She closely examines Futurist literature, art, and politics within the broader context of Italian social history, revealing a surprisingly powerful undercurrent of anxiety among the Futurists--toward the accelerated rhythms of urban life, the rising influence of the masses, changing gender roles, and the destructiveness of war. Poggi traces the movement from its explosive beginnings through its transformations under Fascism to offer completely new insights into familiar Futurist themes, such as the thrill and trauma of velocity, the psychology of urban crowds, and the fantasy of flesh fused with metal, among others. Lavishly illustrated and unparalleled in scope, Inventing Futurism demonstrates that beneath Futurism's belligerent avant-garde posturing lay complex and contradictory attitudes toward an always-deferred utopian future.
Main Description
In 1909 the poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti published the founding manifesto of Italian Futurism, an inflammatory celebration of "the love of danger" and "the beauty of speed" that provoked readers to take aggressive action and "glorify war--the world's only hygiene." Marinetti's words unleashed an influential artistic and political movement that has since been neglected owing to its exaltation of violence and nationalism, its overt manipulation of mass media channels, and its associations with Fascism. Inventing Futurism is a major reassessment of Futurism that reintegrates it into the history of twentieth-century avant-garde artistic movements. Countering the standard view of Futurism as na vely bellicose, Christine Poggi argues that Futurist artists and writers were far more ambivalent in their responses to the shocks of industrial modernity than Marinetti's incendiary pronouncements would suggest. She closely examines Futurist literature, art, and politics within the broader context of Italian social history, revealing a surprisingly powerful undercurrent of anxiety among the Futurists--toward the accelerated rhythms of urban life, the rising influence of the masses, changing gender roles, and the destructiveness of war. Poggi traces the movement from its explosive beginnings through its transformations under Fascism to offer completely new insights into familiar Futurist themes, such as the thrill and trauma of velocity, the psychology of urban crowds, and the fantasy of flesh fused with metal, among others. Lavishly illustrated and unparalleled in scope, Inventing Futurism demonstrates that beneath Futurism's belligerent avant-garde posturing lay complex and contradictory attitudes toward an always-deferred utopian future.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Illustrated throughout and unparalleled in scope, 'Inventing Futurism' demonstrates that beneath Futurism's belligerent avant-garde posturing lay complex and contradictory attitudes toward an always-deferred utopian future.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Futurist Velocitiesp. 1
Folla/Follia: Futurism and the Crowdp. 35
Umberto Boccioni's The City Rises: Picturing the Futurist Metropolisp. 65
Photogenic Abstraction: Giacomo Balla's Iridescent Interpenetrationsp. 109
Dreams of Metallized Flesh: Futurism and the Masculine Bodyp. 150
Futurist Love, Luxury, and Lustp. 181
Return of the Repressed: Vicissitudes of the Futurist Machine Aesthetic under Fascismp. 232
Epiloguep. 266
Notesp. 273
Works Citedp. 349
Indexp. 361
Photography Creditsp. 375
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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