Catalogue

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Law touched our hearts : a generation remembers Brown v. Board of Education /
Mildred Wigfall Robinson and Richard J. Bonnie, editors.
imprint
Nashville : Vanderbilt University Press, 2009.
description
xi, 249 p.
ISBN
9780826516190 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Nashville : Vanderbilt University Press, 2009.
isbn
9780826516190 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6758948
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
40 accounts from those who attended public school soon after Brown and saw the course of their lives and their society change
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2009-02-01:
Editors Robinson and Bonnie (law, Univ. of Virginia) have assembled a collection of 40 essays written by law faculty from around the United States, most of whom were enrolled in public schools at the time the 1954 Brown decision, which outlawed segregated schools, was handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court. Each contributor assesses the immediate reaction to the decision in his or her community and analyzes the longer-term impact of the ruling upon public education in his or her locale. Reflections upon personal life experiences growing up in and transitioning from segregated to desegregated public schools form an integral part of many essays. Each writer strives to articulate the essential meaning of Brown to his or her education, not just the Court's holding, but the ways in which the theoretical, the rational, and the precise terms of the ruling relate to the actual, clumsy, imprecise world in which they lived. Recommended for academic and public libraries.-Philip Y. Blue, New York State Supreme Court Criminal Branch Law Lib., First Judicial Dist. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
...everyone should read this fascinating anthology. -- Kansas History
...everyone should read this fascinating anthology. --Kansas History
Selected as an "Outstanding" University Press Book for Public and Secondary School Libraries. 2010 AAUP Bibliography
These are deeply moving personal perspectives on the civil rights era, revealing in vivid detail how children across the nation lived out the dilemmas of race in their families, schools, and neighborhoods. Kip Kosek, American Studies, George Washington University
These are deeply moving personal perspectives on the civil rights era, revealing in vivid detail how children across the nation lived out the dilemmas of race in their families, schools, and neighborhoods. --Kip Kosek, American Studies, George Washington University
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, February 2009
Reference & Research Book News, May 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title presents, in one source, stories of black and white Americans, men and women, from all parts of the nation, who were public school students during the years immediately after Brown.
Main Description
In February 1954, President Eisenhower invited Chief Justice Warren to dinner at the White House. Among the guests were well-known opponents of school desegregation. During that evening, Eisenhower commented to Warren that "law and force cannot change a man's heart." Three months later, however, the Supreme Court handed down its unanimous decision in Brown, and the contributors to this book, like people across the country, were profoundly changed by it, even though many saw almost nothing change in their communities.What Brown did was to elevate race from the country's dirty secret to its most urgent topic of conversation. This book stands alone in presenting, in one source, stories of black and white Americans, men and women, from all parts of the nation, who were public school students during the years immediately after Brown. All shared an epiphany. Some became aware of race and the burden of racial separation. Others dared to hope that the yoke of racial oppression would at last be lifted.The editors surveyed 4750 law professors born between 1936 and 1954, received 1000 responses, and derived these forty essays from those willing to write personal accounts of their childhood experiences in the classroom and in their communities. Their moving stories of how Brown affected them say much about race relations then and now. They also provide a picture of how social change can shape the careers of an entire generation in one profession.Contributors provide accounts from across the nation. Represented are-de jure states, those segregated by law at the time of Brown, including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, as well as the District of Columbia-de facto states, those where segregation was illegal but a common practice, including California, Illinois, Kansas, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Washington, and Wisconsin.
Main Description
In February 1954, President Eisenhower invited Chief Justice Warren to dinner at the White House. Among the guests were well-known opponents of school desegregation. During that evening, Eisenhower commented to Warren that "law and force cannot change a man's heart." Three months later, however, the Supreme Court handed down its unanimous decision in Brown, and the contributors to this book, like people across the country, were profoundly changed by it, even though many saw almost nothing change in their communities. What Browndid was to elevate race from the country's dirty secret to its most urgent topic of conversation. This book stands alone in presenting, in one source, stories of black and white Americans, men and women, from all parts of the nation, who were public school students during the years immediately after Brown. All shared an epiphany. Some became aware of race and the burden of racial separation. Others dared to hope that the yoke of racial oppression would at last be lifted. The editors surveyed 4750 law professors born between 1936 and 1954, received 1000 responses, and derived these forty essays from those willing to write personal accounts of their childhood experiences in the classroom and in their communities. Their moving stories of how Brownaffected them say much about race relations then and now. They also provide a picture of how social change can shape the careers of an entire generation in one profession. Contributors provide accounts from across the nation. Represented are -de jure states, those segregated by law at the time of Brown, including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, as well as the District of Columbia -de facto states, those where segregation was illegal but a common practice, including California, Illinois, Kansas, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Washington, and Wisconsin.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
The Context-Skin Color and Walls
Learning about Skin Colorp. 11
Segregated Proms in 2003p. 16
The Wallp. 21
And the Walls Came Tumblin' Downp. 23
The Commutative Property of Arithmeticp. 26
De Jure States and the District of Columbia
Alabama
Training in Alabamap. 33
Loss of Innocencep. 36
Toto, I Have a Feeling We Are Still in Kansasp. 43
Florida
Becoming a Legal Troublemakerp. 51
Georgia
Color-Blind in Georgiap. 59
Louisiana
Taking a Standp. 65
Maryland
Seeing the Hollowp. 67
A Glen Echo Passagep. 72
Mississippi
I Can't Play with You No Morep. 79
A White Boy from Mississippip. 83
A Journey of Consciencep. 90
North Carolina
Promise and Paradoxp. 95
A Different Kind of Educationp. 103
South Carolina
Sacrifice, Opportunity, and the New Southp. 107
Tennessee
Crossing Invisible Linesp. 115
Segregation in Memphisp. 123
Virginia
What I Learned When Massive Resistance Closed My Schoolp. 135
Standing Up for Brown in Danvillep. 143
Urgent Conversationsp. 149
Virginia Confronts a "Statesmanlike Decision"p. 153
Brown as Catalystp. 157
Washington, D.C.
Equality and Sorority during the Decade after Brownp. 161
"What Are You Doing Here?" An Autobiographical Fragmentp. 166
De Facto States
California
Brown's Ambiguous Legacyp. 171
Public Education in Los Angeles: Past and Presentp. 176
Illinois
The Discrete and Insular Majorityp. 181
Princess in the Towerp. 184
Kansas
Shades of Brownp. 191
Massachusetts
Brown Comes to Boston: A Courtside Viewp. 195
Missouri
Checkerboard Segregation in the 1950sp. 201
New Jersey
With One Hand Waving Freep. 209
New York
Indirect and Substantial Effectp. 215
Ohio
Brown Goes Northp. 225
Washington
The Virtues of Public Educationp. 231
Wisconsin
Entering Another's Circlep. 235
Appendix
The Surveyp. 241
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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