Catalogue


Folly and fortune in early British history : from Caesar to the Normans /
Kenneth Henshall.
imprint
Houdsmills, Basingstoke ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
description
xvi, 334 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0230555209 (alk. paper), 9780230555204 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houdsmills, Basingstoke ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
isbn
0230555209 (alk. paper)
9780230555204 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6758777
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-12-01:
Every professor and teacher of English history should love this book, which includes exciting materials for numerous lectures, class discussions, and seminar essays. Despite its odd title, this is an extremely well written and thought-provoking exploration of the four times Britain was invaded--by the Romans, by the Saxons, by the Vikings, and by the Normans. There is also a brief but valuable appendix on the question of King Arthur's existence. Henshall (languages and culture, Univ. of Canterbury, New Zealand) must be a master educator, because he continually urges readers to challenge long-accepted explanations. His book, which leans slightly towards military tactics, offers sprightly, well-informed narratives of the invasions, followed by perceptive questions about who did what, or what could have been done differently. Thus, Henshall outlines some 65 significant variables in the 1066 Battle of Hastings that could have altered its outcome, especially better use of archery. Henshall does not offer deep, trailblazing scholarship but rather, truly meaningful history in a most attractive, thoroughly enjoyable manner. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. E. J. Kealey College of the Holy Cross
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Every professor and teacher of English history should love this book, which includes exciting materials for numerous lectures, class discussions, and seminar essays. This is an extremely well written and thought-provoking exploration of the four times Britain was invaded--by the Romans, by the Saxons, by the Vikings, and by the Normans. Henshall must be a master educator, because he continually urges readers to challenge long-accepted explanations. Henshall does not offer deep, trailblazing scholarship but rather, truly meaningful history in a most attractive, thoroughly enjoyable manner. . . Highly recommended. All levels/libraries." - CHOICE
"Every professor and teacher of English history should love this book, which includes exciting materials for numerous lectures, class discussions, and seminar essays. This is an extremely well written and thought-provoking exploration of the four times Britain was invaded--by the Romans, by the Saxons, by the Vikings, and by the Normans. Henshall must be a master educator, because he continually urges readers to challenge long-accepted explanations. Henshall does not offer deep, trailblazing scholarship but rather, truly meaningful history in a most attractive, thoroughly enjoyable manner.. .Highly recommended. All levels/libraries." - CHOICE
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2009
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book examines the role of foolishness in the unfolding of major events in Britain--particularly invasions--from Caesar's expeditions to the Norman Conquest.
Main Description
What errors of judgement led Harold to defeat at Hastings in 1066?
Main Description
With its prime focus on the human factor in history, this book examines the role of foolishness in the unfolding of major events in Britain, particularly invasions, from Caesar's expeditions to the Norman Conquest. Many historians believe that foolishness in a bygone age cannot be meaningfully assessed, but this book does not accept that view.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Focusing on pivotal points in early British history, this title examines the role of folly and fortune in major events in Britain from Caesar's expeditions to the Norman Conquest.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
List of Tablesp. ix
Colour platesp. x
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgementsp. xv
Introduction: Humans, Histoey, Folly, and Fortunep. 1
The Roman Eagle Landsp. 7
Introductionp. 7
Caesar's first foray,55 BC :foolish but fortunate?p. 9
Caesar's tries luck again,54 BCp. 16
Who were the Britons?p. 24
The hundred years respitep. 32
The Claudian invasion, AD 43: Of emperors and elephantsp. 36
Boudica and the revolt of AD 60: Bold but botched?p. 43
Thereafterp. 64
Boudica in historyp. 64
The continuing Roman presencep. 66
Why did things happen the way they did?p. 71
Conclusionp. 79
The coming of the Pagansp. 81
Introductionp. 81
The Anglo-saxon æguests'p. 83
Vortigern the `host' Villain or scapegoat?p. 92
The English make themselves at homep. 96
The uninvited Vikings: Bad boys or bad press?p. 104
Aethertled and the æNew wave' Vikings : Poor king or poor luck?p. 122
Vikings rule :And how Cnut got his feet wetp. 141
Why did things happen the way they did?p. 146
Conclusionp. 157
The Improbable Norman Conquestp. 159
Introductoionp. 159
January 1066: Contested succession, past deedsp. 161
Early February to early September :Manoeuvringsp. 176
Mid to late September: The arrival of Hardraada and Williamp. 182
October and Hastings : Human error or the fortunes of war?p. 93
After Hastingsp. 208
Why did things happen the way they did?p. 213
Some observations on the personalities of the two main protagonistsp. 237
Conclusionp. 241
Conclusion: So just How foolish or fortunate Have We Been?p. 244
Appendices
The question of Arthurp. 252
Timeline of major Events in Early British Historyp. 259
Chronology of kings and Overlords of England from the Anglo-Saxon Advent to the Norman Conquestp. 263
Notesp. 265
Referencesp. 313
Indexp. 24
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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