Catalogue


Conflict and crisis in the religious life of late Victorian England /
Herbert Schlossberg.
imprint
New Brunswick (U.S.A.) : Transaction, c2009.
description
ix, 322 p.
ISBN
9781412810272
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Brunswick (U.S.A.) : Transaction, c2009.
isbn
9781412810272
catalogue key
6757466
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-02-01:
Religion in late Victorian England was not confined to the pulpit or the universities. It contributed to the vitality of the late Victorian period and called for a reexamination of both church and society. Schlossberg, a fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, has written an interesting book that explores the vibrant nature of religious life during this period. Limiting his study to Christianity and saying little about Roman Catholicism, Schlossberg does not offer a general history of Victorian religion or a study of doctrine or institutions, but instead seeks answers for the apparent success of secularism in Victorian England. Dismissing the 1851 religious census as an inaccurate measurement of religion, he instead discusses the "Liberal-Orthodox bipolarity" that predominated during this era. The Evangelical Party and its decay, the waning of nonconformity, and the growth of the High Church Party provide the general background for a more in-depth discussion of biblical criticism, Darwinism, Essays and Reviews (1860), ritualism, the settlement house movement, and alternatives to Christianity such as positivism, atheism, and spiritualism. Based on 19th-century sources and recent scholarship, this volume presents an insightful analysis of the world of late Victorian religion. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-level undergraduates and above. R. M. Kollar St. Vincent College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Richly detailed... weave(s) together an intricate tapestry of Victorian voices. His approach relies on juxtaposing contemporary reflections rather than superimposing secondary frameworks... This approach allows the reader to engage directly with the highly nuanced socio-religious climate of late Victorian England." -Sarah C. Williams, American Historical Review
"Richly detailed... weave(s) together an intricate tapestry of Victorian voices. His approach relies on juxtaposing contemporary reflections rather than superimposing secondary frameworks... This approach allows the reader to engage directly with the highly nuanced socio-religious climate of late Victorian England." --Sarah C. Williams, American Historical Review
"Herbert Schlossberg's brilliant and learned book… is a most lively and stimulating work of interpretative summary and synthesis by a master of the subject." Sheridan Gilley, Durham University
"Herbert Schlossberg's brilliant and learned book... is a most lively and stimulating work of interpretative summary and synthesis by a master of the subject." - Sheridan Gilley, Durham University
"An interesting book that explores the vibrant nature of religious life during this period. Limiting his study to Christianity and saying little about Roman Catholicism, Schlossberg does not offer a general history of Victorian religion or a study of doctrine or institutions, but instead seeks answers for the apparent success of secularism in Victorian England...Based on 19th-century sources and recent scholarship, this volume presents an insightful analysis of the world of late Victorian religion." -R. M. Kollar, Choice
"An interesting book that explores the vibrant nature of religious life during this period. Limiting his study to Christianity and saying little about Roman Catholicism, Schlossberg does not offer a general history of Victorian religion or a study of doctrine or institutions, but instead seeks answers for the apparent success of secularism in Victorian England…Based on 19th-century sources and recent scholarship, this volume presents an insightful analysis of the world of late Victorian religion." R. M. Kollar, Choice
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Choice, February 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
Contrary to its popular image as dull and stodgy, theVictorian period was one of revolutionary change. In itspolitics, its art, its economic affairs, its class relationships,and in its religion, change was constant. A half-century afterQueen Victoria’s death, it was said that she was born in oneworld and died in another. The most interesting and valuablestudies of the period take the long view, as does Schlossberg,in his fascinating analysis of religious life in this period.For the Victorians, religion was not cordoned off fromthe push and shove of real life. The early evangelicals gotoff to a shaky start, beset by hostility, but the movementspread within the churches despite the suspicion in whichit was held. Evangelicals, frequently called Puritans bythose who opposed them, called for fundamental reformsin both the Church and the society; a social ethic was partof their program of religious renewal. Their moral senseexplains the social activism of both Church of EnglandEvangelicals and Dissenters, including the half-centurycrusade for the abolition of slavery.Schlossberg shows how religion in England dealt withsuch issues as science and the effect of German scholarshipon religious thinking. Church history cannot simplybe explained by its response to external forces as much asby the internal responses to those challenges. The natureof the religious enterprise itself, its theologians, clergy, laypeople-like all people and all institutions-all respondedwith alternatives. Schlossberg helps us understand theVictorian period, as well as the increasing secularity ofEnglish life today.
Main Description
Contrary to its popular image as dull and stodgy, the Victorian period was one of revolutionary change. In its politics, its art, its economic affairs, its class relationships, and in its religion, change was constant. A half-century after Queen Victorias death, it was said that she was born in one world and died in another. The most interesting and valuable studies of the period take the long view, as does Schlossberg, in his fascinating analysis of religious life in this period. For the Victorians, religion was not cordoned off from the push and shove of real life. The early evangelicals got off to a shaky start, beset by hostility, but the movement spread within the churches despite the suspicion in which it was held. Evangelicals, frequently called Puritans by those who opposed them, called for fundamental reforms in both the Church and the society; a social ethic was part of their program of religious renewal. Their moral sense explains the social activism of both Church of England Evangelicals and Dissenters, including the half-century crusade for the abolition of slavery. Schlossberg shows how religion in England dealt with such issues as science and the effect of German scholarship on religious thinking. Church history cannot simply be explained by its response to external forces as much as by the internal responses to those challenges. The nature of the religious enterprise itself, its theologians, clergy, lay people-like all people and all institutions-all responded with alternatives. Schlossberg helps us understand the Victorian period, as well as the increasing secularity of English life today.
Main Description
Contrary to its popular image as dull and stodgy, the Victorian period was one of revolutionary change. In its politics, its art, its economic affairs, its class relationships, and in its religion, change was constant. A half-century after Queen Victoria's death, it was said that she was born in one world and died in another. The most interesting and valuable studies of the period take the long view, as does Schlossberg, in his fascinating analysis of religious life in this period. For the Victorians, religion was not cordoned off from the push and shove of real life. The early evangelicals got off to a shaky start, beset by hostility, but the movement spread within the churches despite the suspicion in which it was held. Evangelicals, frequently called Puritans by those who opposed them, called for fundamental reforms in both the Church and the society; a social ethic was part of their program of religious renewal. Their moral sense explains the social activism of both Church of England Evangelicals and Dissenters, including the half-century crusade for the abolition of slavery. Schlossberg shows how religion in England dealt with such issues as science and the effect of German scholarship on religious thinking. Church history cannot simply be explained by its response to external forces as much as by the internal responses to those challenges. The nature of the religious enterprise itself, its theologians, clergy, lay people-like all people and all institutions-all responded with alternatives. Schlossberg helps us understand the Victorian period, as well as the increasing secularity of English life today.
Main Description
Contrary to its popular image as dull and stodgy, the Victorian period was one of revolutionary change. In its politics, its art, its economic aff airs, its class relationships, and in its religion, change was constant. A half-century after Queen Victoria's death, it was said that she was born in one world and died in another. Th e most interesting and valuable studies of the period take the long view, as does Schlossberg, in his fascinating analysis of religious life in this period. For the Victorians, religion was not cordoned off from the push and shove of real life. Th e early evangelicals got off to a shaky start, beset by hostility, but the movement spread within the churches despite the suspicion in which it was held. Evangelicals, frequently called Puritans by those who opposed them, called for fundamental reforms in both the Church and the society; a social ethic was part of their program of religious renewal. Th eir moral sense explains the social activism of both Church of England Evangelicals and Dissenters, including the half-century crusade for the abolition of slavery. Schlossberg shows how religion in England dealt with such issues as science and the eff ect of German scholarship on religious thinking. Church history cannot simply be explained by its response to external forces as much as by the internal responses to those challenges. Th e nature of the religious enterprise itself, its theologians, clergy, lay people--like all people and all institutions--all responded with alternatives. Schlossberg helps us understand the Victorian period, as well as the increasing secularity of English life today.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Contrary to its popular image as dull and stodgy, the Victorian period was one of revolutionary change. This study presents an analysis of religious life in this period.
Table of Contents
Dedicatory Notep. ix
Introductionp. 1
The Setting for the Coming Strugglesp. 21
The Decay of the Evangelical Party in the Church of Englandp. 59
The Waning of the Nonconformist Spiritp. 99
The High Church on the Way to Ascendencyp. 139
Truth, Freedom, and the Fratricide of the Orthodoxp. 175
The Diffusive Religion of the Late Victoriansp. 211
Alternatives to Christianityp. 253
Conclusionsp. 285
Indexp. 315
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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