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Inheriting the Holocaust : a second-generation memoir /
Paula S. Fass.
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2009.
description
x, 193 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813544580 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780813544588 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2009.
isbn
0813544580 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780813544588 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Going to Poland: May 2000 -- I never had grandparents -- One uncle -- The complexity of aunts -- First families -- My parents -- My mother/myself.
catalogue key
6754177
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
In Inheriting the Holocaust, Paula S. Fass explores her own past as the daughter of Holocaust survivors to reflect on the nature of history and memory. Through her parents' experiences and the stories they recounted, Fass defined her engagement as a historian and used these skills to better understand her parents' lives.
Flap Copy
In Inheriting the Holocaust, Paula S. Fass explores her own past as the daughter of Holocaust survivors to reflect on the nature of history and memory. Through her parents’ experiences and the stories they recounted, Fass defined her engagement as a historian and used these skills to better understand her parents’ lives.
Flap Copy
In Inheriting the Holocaust, Paula S. Fass explores her own past as the daughter of Holocaust survivors to reflect on the nature of history and memory. Through her parentsÂ' experiences and the stories they recounted, Fass defined her engagement as a historian and used these skills to better understand her parentsÂ' lives.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-09-01:
Holocaust survivor literature is replete with examples of the difficulty of explaining the inexplicable and the burden of memory. The children of survivors, however, face the burden of the unspoken past; relatives discuss the past in whispers and fragments of conversations. Berkeley historian Fass's remarkable memoir pieces together these fragments to tell a poignant, honest account of her parents' lives and families--their endurance, suffering, and loss. Her reconstruction of her family's history from memories of past conversations and experiences, photographs, and few documents speaks to the rich complexity of eastern European Jewish life in the 19th and 20th centuries. One can perhaps quibble about some of the historian's comments and conclusions, but they do not detract from her remarkable exercise in the historian's craft of reconstructing the past. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers, lower-division undergraduates. R. K. Byczkiewicz Central Connecticut State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In this moving and eloquent book, Paula Fass explores the legacies of love and loss that the children of Holocaust survivors inherit." James Sheehan, Stanford University
"Paula Fass combines her skills as an historian, writer, and researcher with her position as a child of survivors with memories imparted by her parents to create an unusual memoir of being part of the 'second generation.' Her exceptional skills as a writer make this book more than the usual random memoir of information. The result is a touching family story supported by historical fact." Jewish Book World
"Paula Fass's moving memoir is written with quiet dignity and the most impressive moral lucidity. Her account of a family devastated by genocide is testimony both to human resilience and to the painful price of emotional fragility paid in the midst of the resilience." Robert Alter, University of California, Berkeley
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text explores the author's own past as the daughter of a Holocaust survivor. It reflects on the nature of history and memory and defines Fass's engagement as a historian.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work explores the author's own past as the daughter of Holocaust survivors to reflect on the nature of history and memory. Through her parents' experiences and the stories they recounted, this title defines her engagement as a historian.
Main Description
In Inheriting the Holocaust, Paula S. Fass explores her own past as the daughter of Holocaust survivors to reflect on the nature of history and memory. Through her parents experiences and the stories they recounted, Fass defined her engagement as a historian and used these skills to better understand her parents lives.
Main Description
In Inheriting the Holocaust, Paula S. Fass explores her own past as the daughter of Holocaust survivors to reflect on the nature of history and memory. Through her parents' experiences and the stories they recounted, Fass defined her engagement as a historian and used these skills to better understand her parents' lives. Fass begins her journey through time and relationships when she travels to Poland and locates birth certificates of the murdered siblings she never knew. That journey to recover her family's story provides her with ever more evidence for the perplexing reliability of memory and its winding path toward historical reconstruction. In the end, Fass recovers parts of her family's history only to discover that Poland is rapidly re-imagining the role Jews played in the nation's past.
Main Description
In Inheriting the Holocaust, Paula S. Fass explores her own past as the daughter of Holocaust survivors to reflect on the nature of history and memory. Through her parents' experiences and the stories they recounted, Fass defined her engagement as a historian and used these skills to better understand her parents' lives.Fass begins her journey through time and relationships when she travels to Poland and locates birth certificates of the murdered siblings she never knew. That journey to recover her family's story provides her with ever more evidence for the perplexing reliability of memory and its winding path toward historical reconstruction. In the end, Fass recovers parts of her family's history only to discover that Poland is rapidly re-imagining the role Jews played in the nation's past.
Main Description
In Inheriting the Holocaust, Paula S. Fass explores her own past as the daughter of Holocaust survivors to reflect on the nature of history and memory. Through her parents’ experiences and the stories they recounted, Fass defined her engagement as a historian and used these skills to better understand her parents’ lives.Fass begins her journey through time and relationships when she travels to Poland and locates birth certificates of the murdered siblings she never knew. That journey to recover her family’s story provides her with ever more evidence for the perplexing reliability of memory and its winding path toward historical reconstruction. In the end, Fass recovers parts of her family’s history only to discover that Poland is rapidly re-imagining the role Jews played in the nation’s past.
Main Description
In Inheriting the Holocaust, Paula S. Fass explores her own past as the daughter of Holocaust survivors to reflect on the nature of history and memory. Through her parentsÂ' experiences and the stories they recounted, Fass defined her engagement as a historian and used these skills to better understand her parentsÂ' lives.Fass begins her journey through time and relationships when she travels to Poland and locates birth certificates of the murdered siblings she never knew. That journey to recover her familyÂ's story provides her with ever more evidence for the perplexing reliability of memory and its winding path toward historical reconstruction. In the end, Fass recovers parts of her familyÂ's history only to discover that Poland is rapidly re-imagining the role Jews played in the nationÂ's past.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: Inheriting Memoryp. 1
Going to Poland: May 2000p. 7
I Never Had Grandparentsp. 32
One Unclep. 62
The Complexity of Auntsp. 85
First Familiesp. 109
My Parentsp. 120
My Mother/Myselfp. 173
Afterword: Poland, Againp. 183
Appendix: Family Treep. 193
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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