Catalogue


Bernard Shaw and the BBC /
L.W. Conolly.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2009.
description
xxi, 292 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802089208 (cloth), 9780802089205 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2009.
isbn
0802089208 (cloth)
9780802089205 (cloth)
catalogue key
6754040
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [273]-276) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
I will not consent to the omission of a single word or comma from the first act of Arms and the Man. You can find 40 minutes for a Church service. You can find 45 minutes for a Brahms symphony. You can find 60 minutes for the most damnable variety muck or for one of your intolerable rechauffs of obsolete drivel from the XIX century. Well, if you want me you must find 40, 50, 60, and if necessary 180 minutes for me, or else do without me. Tell those overseas people that their thirty minute arrangements are not applicable to works of art, but only to tripe, which can be cut up and supplied by the pound.
Main Description
George Bernard Shaw's frequently stormy but always creative relationship with the British Broadcasting Corporation was in large part responsible for making him a household name on both sides of the Atlantic. From the founding of the BBC in 1922 to his death in 1950, Shaw supported the BBC by participating in debates, giving talks, permitting radio and television broadcasts of many of his plays - even advising on pronunciation questions. Here, for the first time, Leonard Conolly illuminates the often grudging, though usually mutually beneficial, relationship between two of the twentieth century's cultural giants.Drawing on extensive archival materials held in England, the United States, and Canada, Bernard Shaw and the BBC presents a vivid portrait of many contentious issues negotiated between Shaw and the public broadcaster. This is a fascinating study of how controversial works were first performed in both radio and television's infancies. It details debates about freedom of speech, the editing of plays for broadcast, and the protection of authors' rights to control and profit from works performed for radio and television broadcasts. Conolly also scrutinizes Second World War-era censorship, when the British government banned Shaw from making any broadcasts that questioned British policies or strategies.Rich in detail and brimming with Shaw's irrepressible wit, this book also provides links to online appendices of Shaw's broadcasts for the BBC, texts of Shaw's major BBC talks, extracts from German wartime propaganda broadcasts about Shaw, and the BBC's obituaries for Shaw.
Main Description
George Bernard Shaw's frequently stormy but always creative relationship with the British Broadcasting Corporation was in large part responsible for making him a household name on both sides of the Atlantic. From the founding of the BBC in 1922 to his death in 1950, Shaw supported the BBC by participating in debates, giving talks, permitting radio and television broadcasts of many of his plays - even advising on pronunciation questions. Here, for the first time, Leonard Conolly illuminates the often grudging, though usually mutually beneficial, relationship between two of the twentieth century's cultural giants. Drawing on extensive archival materials held in England, the United States, and Canada, Bernard Shaw and the BBCpresents a vivid portrait of many contentious issues negotiated between Shaw and the public broadcaster. This is a fascinating study of how controversial works were first performed in both radio and television's infancies. It details debates about freedom of speech, the editing of plays for broadcast, and the protection of authors' rights to control and profit from works performed for radio and television broadcasts. Conolly also scrutinizes Second World War-era censorship, when the British government banned Shaw from making any broadcasts that questioned British policies or strategies. Rich in detail and brimming with Shaw's irrepressible wit, this book also provides links to online appendices of Shaw's broadcasts for the BBC, texts of Shaw's major BBC talks, extracts from German wartime propaganda broadcasts about Shaw, and the BBC's obituaries for Shaw.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
A Chronology of Bernard Shaw and the BBCp. xix
Abbreviationsp. xxiii
In the Beginning, 1923-1928p. 3
Saint Joan, 1929p. 38
'Saying Nice Things Is Not My Business': Shaw Talks, 1929-1937p. 50
'Radiogenic Shaw': Broadcast Plays, 1929-1939p. 74
'GBS Has Been Very Kindly Disposed': Pre-War Televisionp. 89
'I Won't Have That Man on the Air': The War Yearsp. 99
Television Returns, 1946-1950p. 129
Radio Finale, 1945-1950p. 138
Epiloguep. 160
Shaw's Broadcast Plays and Talks, 1923-1950p. 171
Texts of Selected Shaw Broadcastsp. 176
German Wartime Propaganda Broadcasts about Shaw, 1940p. 211
BBC Obituaries of Shawp. 214
Notesp. 241
Bibliographyp. 273
Indexp. 277
Illustrations follow pp. 104
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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