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The incarnate text : imagining the book in Reformation England /
James Kearney.
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2009.
description
312 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0812241584 (alk. paper), 9780812241587 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2009.
isbn
0812241584 (alk. paper)
9780812241587 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6753471
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [281]-304) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-01-01:
In this fascinating study, Kearney (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara) draws on an astonishingly wide range of scholarship in Renaissance studies and employs a number of current critical practices, especially in the history of the book, cultural materialism, intellectual history, and good old-fashioned close reading. Responding to the past 30 years of scholarly interest in "the history of the codex," Kearney answers a question he poses on the first page: "How were books imagined in early modern England?" The author "explores the ways the book was imagined during a crisis in representation and language ... that was sparked by the Reformation." He investigates the place of the book in material culture of the early modern period by "attending to the ways in which writers in the period thought in materialist terms" through the "dialectic of subject and object, the interpenetration of self and world." Kearney closely reads key Renaissance texts of Erasmus, Shakespeare, Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, and Francis Bacon, illustrating his premise in clear, elegant prose that provides readers with a rich, deep appreciation of the period. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readers. M. Cole Alfred State College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Kearney's study is a brilliant account of the book in post-Reformation England. By thinking hard and imaginatively about what books were and what books did, about how they were imagined, produced, and used, Kearney provides us with a compelling and often surprising history of a world whose defining theological, epistemological, and psychological characteristics have combined to shape our own."--David Scott Kastan, Yale University
"Kearney's study is a brilliant account of the book in post-Reformation England. By thinking hard and imaginatively about what books were and what books did, about how they were imagined, produced, and used, Kearney provides us with a compelling and often surprising history of a world whose defining theological, epistemological, and psychological characteristics have combined to shape our own."-David Scott Kastan, Yale University
Selected by Choicemagazine as an Outstanding Academic Title for 2010
"The Incarnate Textrepresents the best of the new eclecticism that has been characterizing much ofRenaissance studies in the last ten years. Kearney draws his models from a wide array of critical practices. At core, the project is securely rooted in an old tradition of intellectual history and close reading but energized by a series of strategies drawn from cultural materialism, deconstruction, discourses of the body, and history of the book."--Ritchie Kendall, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
" The Incarnate Textrepresents the best of the new eclecticism that has been characterizing much of Renaissance studies in the last ten years. Kearney draws his models from a wide array of critical practices. At core, the project is securely rooted in an old tradition of intellectual history and close reading but energized by a series of strategies drawn from cultural materialism, deconstruction, discourses of the body, and history of the book."-Ritchie Kendall, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
"The Incarnate Textrepresents the best of the new eclecticism that has been characterizing much of Renaissance studies in the last ten years. Kearney draws his models from a wide array of critical practices. At core, the project is securely rooted in an old tradition of intellectual history and close reading but energized by a series of strategies drawn from cultural materialism, deconstruction, discourses of the body, and history of the book."--Ritchie Kendall, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Drawing on a wide range of topics - from humanism and hermeneutics to secularisation and enlightenment - this book tells the story of how the crisis of the book during the Reformation, helped to change the way the modern world apprehends both texts and things.
Main Description
In the course of the Reformation, artistic representation famously came under attack. Statues were destroyed, music and theater were forbidden, and poetry was denounced, all in the name of eradicating superstition and idolatry. The iconoclastic impulse that sparked these attacks, however, proved remarkably productive, generating a profusion of theological, polemical, and literary writing from Catholics and Protestants alike. Reformers like Luther had promised a return to the book, attacking Catholicism as a religion of images and icons. Becoming a religion of the book in the way that Reformers proposed, however, proved impossible: language is inescapably material; books are necessarily things, objects that are seen and touched. The antitheses at the heart of this opposition--word versus thing, text versus image--have had far-reaching effects on the modern world. James Kearney engages with recent work in the history of the book and the history of religion to investigate the crisis of the book occasioned by the Reformation's simultaneous faith in text and distrust of material forms. Drawing in a wide range of topics--from humanism and hermeneutics to secularization and enlightenment, from iconoclasm and anti-Semitism to barbarism and fetishism--and looking to a range of texts--including Erasmus'sJerome, Spenser'sFaerie Queene, and Shakespeare's Tempest--The Incarnate Texttells the story of how this crisis of the book helped to change the way the modern world apprehends both texts and things.
Main Description
In the course of the Reformation, artistic representation famously came under attack. Statues were destroyed, music and theater were forbidden, and poetry was denounced, all in the name of eradicating superstition and idolatry. The iconoclastic impulse that sparked these attacks, however, proved remarkably productive, generating a profusion of theological, polemical, and literary writing from Catholics and Protestants alike. Reformers like Luther had promised a return to the book, attacking Catholicism as a religion of images and icons. Becoming a religion of the book in the way that Reformers proposed, however, proved impossible: language is inescapably material; books are necessarily things, objects that are seen and touched. The antitheses at the heart of this opposition-word versus thing, text versus image-have had far-reaching effects on the modern world. James Kearney engages with recent work in the history of the book and the history of religion to investigate the crisis of the book occasioned by the Reformation's simultaneous faith in text and distrust of material forms. Drawing in a wide range of topics-from humanism and hermeneutics to secularization and enlightenment, from iconoclasm and anti-Semitism to barbarism and fetishism-and looking to a range of texts-including Erasmus's Jerome, Spenser's Faerie Queene, and Shakespeare's Tempest- The Incarnate Texttells the story of how this crisis of the book helped to change the way the modern world apprehends both texts and things.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
"Relics of the Mind": Erasmian Humanism and Textual Presencep. 42
Rewriting the Letter: Textual Icons and Linguistic Artifacts in Book I of The Faerie Queenep. 85
The Reading of the Damned: Doctor Faustus and Textual Conversionp. 140
Book, Trinket, Fetish: Letters and Mastery in The Tempestp. 178
Epilogue: Bacon's Impossible Bookp. 224
Notesp. 241
Bibliographyp. 281
Indexp. 305
Acknowledgmentsp. 311
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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