Catalogue


Elizabeth I and her age : authoritative texts, commentary and criticism /
edited by Donald Stump, Susan M. Felch.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : W.W. Norton, c2009.
description
xxix, 896 p. : ill.
ISBN
0393928225 (pbk.), 9780393928228 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : W.W. Norton, c2009.
isbn
0393928225 (pbk.)
9780393928228 (pbk.)
catalogue key
6730411
 
Gift to Victoria University Library. Renaissance and Reformation/Renaissance et Réforme. 2012/11/06.
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title includes a number of Elizabeth's poems, prayers, speeches, proclamations and letters, setting them side by side with other contemporary works that focus on the same crises and controversies.
Main Description
About the Series: No other series of classic texts equals the caliber of theNorton Critical Editions. Each volume combines the most authoritative text available with the comprehensive pedagogical apparatus necessary to appreciate the work fully. Careful editing, first-rate translation, and thorough explanatory annotations allow each text to meet the highest literary standards while remaining accessible to students. Each edition is printed on acid-free paper and every text in the series remains in print. Norton Critical Editions are the choice for excellence in scholarship for students at more than 2,000 universities worldwide.
Main Description
Succeeding to the English throne in 1558, she was the third woman monarch in the nation "s history. The role of English monarch ”which involved being commander in chief, head of the English Church, and ruler of the royal court, with all its intrigues ”was intended for a man ruling among men, and women rulers before Elizabeth had bestowed their power on husbands. Resisting this pattern, Elizabeth not only endured a monarch but flourished as a leader and cultural figurehead, inspiring the Golden Age of English literature, the Age of Discovery, and the Age of Reformation in English religious life. This Norton Critical Edition provides a diverse and extensive selection of authors (including the Queen herself) and carefully annotated works. The works are organized chronologically to cover the forty-four years of Elizabeth "s reign, allowing readers to explore not only the literary and aesthetic qualities that make these writings noteworthy but also the range of political, social, cultural, and historical concerns that prompted their creation. The editors have assembled a rich, thematically organized collection of commentary and criticism for Elizabeth I and Her Age. From Raphael Holinshed "s, Sir Francis Bacon "s, and Agnes Strickland "s early accounts of the Queen to Natalie Mears on Elizabeth I "s strategies for rule and Thomas Betteridge on the Queen in film, the twenty-five diverse views of Elizabeth I herein are sure to promote lively classroom discussion.
Main Description
Succeeding to the English throne in 1558, she was the third woman monarch in the nation's history. The role of English monarch-which involved being commander in chief, head of the English Church, and ruler of the royal court, with all its intrigues-was intended for a man ruling among men, and women rulers before Elizabeth had bestowed their power on husbands. Resisting this pattern, Elizabeth not only endured a monarch but flourished as a leader and cultural figurehead, inspiring the Golden Age of English literature, the Age of Discovery, and the Age of Reformation in English religious life. This Norton Critical Edition provides a diverse and extensive selection of authors (including the Queen herself) and carefully annotated works. The works are organized chronologically to cover the forty-four years of Elizabeth's reign, allowing readers to explore not only the literary and aesthetic qualities that make these writings noteworthy but also the range of political, social, cultural, and historical concerns that prompted their creation. The editors have assembled a rich, thematically organized collection of commentary and criticism for Elizabeth I and Her Age. From Raphael Holinshed's, Sir Francis Bacon's, and Agnes Strickland's early accounts of the Queen to Natalie Mears on Elizabeth I's strategies for rule and Thomas Betteridge on the Queen in film, the twenty-five diverse views of Elizabeth I herein are sure to promote lively classroom discussion.
Main Description
Succeeding to the English throne in 1558, she was the third woman monarch in the nation's history. The role of English monarch'”which involved being commander in chief, head of the English Church, and ruler of the royal court, with all its intrigues'”was intended for a man ruling among men, and women rulers before Elizabeth had bestowed their power on husbands. Resisting this pattern, Elizabeth not only endured a monarch but flourished as a leader and cultural figurehead, inspiring the Golden Age of English literature, the Age of Discovery, and the Age of Reformation in English religious life. This Norton Critical Edition provides a diverse and extensive selection of authors (including the Queen herself) and carefully annotated works. The works are organized chronologically to cover the forty-four years of Elizabeth's reign, allowing readers to explore not only the literary and aesthetic qualities that make these writings noteworthy but also the range of political, social, cultural, and historical concerns that prompted their creation. The editors have assembled a rich, thematically organized collection of commentary and criticism for Elizabeth I and Her Age. From Raphael Holinshed's, Sir Francis Bacon's, and Agnes Strickland's early accounts of the Queen to Natalie Mears on Elizabeth I's strategies for rule and Thomas Betteridge on the Queen in film, the twenty-five diverse views of Elizabeth I herein are sure to promote lively classroom discussion.

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