Catalogue


Intellectuals and left politics in Uruguay, 1958-2006 /
Stephen Gregory.
imprint
Brighton ; Portland : Sussex Academic Press, 2008.
description
vii, 234 p.
ISBN
9781845192655 (h/c : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Brighton ; Portland : Sussex Academic Press, 2008.
isbn
9781845192655 (h/c : alk. paper)
contents note
Uruguay as a question -- From alienation to integration : intellectuals, politics and polemics -- From Fidel to the Frente : the Uruguayan left looks for someone to talk to -- Dialogue engaged : the Frente Amplio as coalition -- The armed cforces and failure -- The revenge of the foreign : Uruguay on the eve of de(con)struction -- Dialogue resumed : democracy, intellectuals and the Frente Amplio in post-dictatorship Uruguay -- Dialogue outside politics : Uruguay as problem in the twenty-first century.
catalogue key
6722532
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-02-01:
Via consideration of published scholarship and archival materials, Gregory (Univ. of New South Wales, Australia) examines the evolution of intellectuals' engagement in political life and public debate over an eventful half century in Uruguay. This chronologically organized account begins with the debates from the late 1950s through the early 1970s in which the Frente Amplio was established as a new political movement. The second half of the book examines the military dictatorship, the transition to democracy, and the shift toward an increasingly electorally successful Frente Amplio, culminating in Tabare Vazquez's victory in the 2004 presidential election. Gregory's ambitious attempt to synthesize five decades of debate, literary criticism, political mobilization, and political reorganization in 159 pages makes this book more accessible to readers already familiar with Uruguayan politics. For two respectively divergent edited volumes on the contemporary Left in several Latin American countries (including Uruguay), see Patrick Barrett, Daniel Chavez, and Cesar Rodriguez-Garavito's The New Latin American Left: Utopia Reborn (2008) and Jorge Castaneda and Marco Morales's Leftovers: Tales of the Two Latin American Lefts (CH, Apr'09, 46-4663). Gregory's monograph is best suited for graduate students and faculty interested in the interpretation of political texts. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate and research collections. C. H. Blake James Madison University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Gregory considers the half-century that began with the election of the National Party the first change of ruling party in 90 years and the victory of the Frente Amplio government the first by a center-left party since the South American country gained independence from Spain. His main argument is that during the 1960s, Uruguayan intellectuals helped a fragmented left unify and broaden its constituency with a new kind of politics built on consensus and dialogue in an increasingly polarized society. Alas, the effort foundered on the same widening social and political rifts that led to the 1973 coup and 12 years of dictatorship, he says, and relations between intellectuals and politics after the return of democracy has taken two paths." Reference & Research Book News
"Stephen Gregory's book examines intellectual discourse and practice in the politics of the demise and rebirth of Uruguay's democracy from the late 1950s until the beginning of the twenty-first century and, as the title indicates, particularly the role of intellectuals on the left of the ideological spectrum." Bulletin of Latin American Research
"Via consideration of published scholarship and archival materials, Gregory examines the evolution of intellectuals' engagement in political life and public debate over an eventful half century in Uruguay. . . . Gregory's ambitious attempt to synthesize five decades of debate, literary criticism, political mobilization, and political reorganization in 159 pages makes this book more accessible to readers already familiar with Uruguayan politics. Gregory's monograph is best suited for graduate students and faculty interested in the interpretation of political texts." Choice
"Via consideration of published scholarship and archival materials, Gregory (Univ. of New South Wales, Australia) examines the evolution of intellectuals' engagement in political life and public debate over an eventful half century in Uruguay. This chronologically organized account begins with the debates from the late 1950s through the early 1970s in which the Frente Amplio was established as a new political movement. The second half of the book examines the military dictatorship, the transition to democracy, and the shift toward an increasingly electorally successful Frente Amplio, culminating the Tabaré Vázquez's victory in the 2004 presidential election. Gregory's ambitious attempt to synthesize five decades of debate, literary criticism, political mobilization, and political reorganization in 159 pages makes this book more accessible to readers already familiar with Uruguayan politics. Gregory's monograph is best suited for graduate students and faculty interested in the interpretation of political texts." Choice
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Choice, February 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Beginning in the year Uruguayans elected a different party into government for the first time in nearly a century, the author examines intellectuals' role in the Uruguayan left's drive toward unity and effectiveness.
Main Description
Beginning in the year Uruguayans elected a different party into government for the first time in nearly a century, the author examines intellectuals' role in the Uruguayan left's drive toward unity and effectiveness. Discussion focuses on fragmentation and impotence on the left; frustrated attempts at left unity in the 1960s; the creation of the centre-left Broad Front in 1971; and the defeat of all left endeavors and all dialogue in the 1973 military coup, a prelude to a 12 year dictatorship in which the military substituted themselves for intellectuals. The story continues in 1985, reversing the earlier trend in a record of dispersal and diversity. The author details the initial post-authoritarian anarchic cultural outburst--part celebration, part frustration; intellectuals' role in the disputes that accompanied the Broad Front's move from democratic socialism to social democracy and from opposition to government in 2004; and recent excursions into the long-standing Uruguayan obsession with its identity and viability as an independent nation. This book is essential reading for all those interested in interplay between intellectuals and politics in Latin America, changes in the Latin American left since the 1960s, and the leftward drift of elected governments in the Southern Cone.
Main Description
Beginning in the year Uruguayans elected a different party into government for the first time in nearly a century, the author examines intellectuals' role in the Uruguayan left's drive toward unity and effectiveness. Discussion focuses on fragmentation and impotence on the left; frustrated attempts at left unity in the 1960s; the creation of the centre-left Broad Front in 1971; and the defeat of all left endeavors and all dialogue in the 1973 military coup, a prelude to a 12 year dictatorship in which the military substituted themselves for intellectuals. The story continues in 1985, reversing the earlier trend in a record of dispersal and diversity. The author details the initial post-authoritarian anarchic cultural outburstpart celebration, part frustration; intellectuals' role in the disputes that accompanied the Broad Front's move from democratic socialism to social democracy and from opposition to government in 2004; and recent excursions into the long-standing Uruguayan obsession with its identity and viability as an independent nation. This book is essential reading for all those interested in interplay between intellectuals and politics in Latin America, changes in the Latin American left since the 1960s, and the leftward drift of elected governments in the Southern Cone.
Main Description
Beginning in the year Uruguayans elected a different party into government for the first time in nearly a century, the author examines intellectuals' role in the Uruguayan left's drive toward unity and effectiveness. Discussion focuses on fragmentation and impotence on the left; frustrated attempts at left unity in the 1960s; the creation of the centre-left Broad Front in 1971; and the defeat of all left endeavours and all dialogue in the 1973 military coup -- a prelude to a twelve-year dictatorship in which the military substituted themselves for intellectuals. The story continues in 1985, reversing the earlier trend in a record of dispersal and diversity. The author details the initial post-authoritarian anarchic cultural outburst -- part celebration, part frustration; intellectuals' role in the disputes that accompanied the Broad Front's move from democratic socialism to social democracy, and from opposition to government in 2004; and recent excursions into the long-standing Uruguayan obsession with its identity and viability as an independent nation. This book is essential reading for all those interested in interplay between intellectuals and politics in Latin America; changes in the Latin American left since the 1960s; and the leftward drift of elected governments in the Southern Cone.
Main Description
Beginning in the year Uruguayans elected a different party into government for the first time in nearly a century, the author examines intellectuals' role in the Uruguayan lefts drive toward unity and effectiveness. Discussion focuses on fragmentation and impotence on the left; frustrated attempts at left unity in the 1960s; the creation of the centre-left Broad Front in 1971; and the defeat of all left endeavours and all dialogue in the 1973 military coup -- a prelude to a twelve-year dictatorship in which the military substituted themselves for intellectuals. The story continues in 1985, reversing the earlier trend in a record of dispersal and diversity. The author details the initial post-authoritarian anarchic cultural outburst -- part celebration, part frustration; intellectuals role in the disputes that accompanied the Broad Fronts move from democratic socialism to social democracy, and from opposition to government in 2004; and recent excursions into the long-standing Uruguayan obsession with its identity and viability as an independent nation. This book is essential reading for all those interested in interplay between intellectuals and politics in Latin America; changes in the Latin American left since the 1960s; and the leftward drift of elected governments in the Southern Cone.
Main Description
Beginning with the year Uruguayans elected a different party into government for the first time in nearly a century, author Stephen Gregory examines the intellectuals' role in the Uruguayan left's drive toward unity and effectiveness. Discussion focuses o
Main Description
Beginning with the year Uruguayans elected a different party into government for the first time in nearly a century, author Stephen Gregory examines the intellectuals' role in the Uruguayan left's drive toward unity and effectiveness. Discussion focuses on fragmentation and impotence on the left, frustrated attempts at the left's unity in the 1960s, the creation of the center-left Broad Front in 1971, and the defeat of all left endeavors and all dialogue in the 1973 military coup - a prelude to a twelve-year dictatorship in which the military substituted themselves for intellectuals. The story continues in 1985, reversing the earlier trend in a record of dispersal and diversity. The author details the initial post-authoritarian anarchic cultural outburst - part celebration, part frustration; the intellectuals' role in the disputes that accompanied the Broad Front's move from democratic socialism to social democracy, and from opposition to government in 2004; and recent excursions into the long-standing Uruguayan obsession with its identity and viability as an independent nation. This book is essential reading for all those interested in interplay between intellectuals and politics in Latin America, changes in the Latin American left since the 1960s, and the leftward drift of elected governments in the Southern Cone.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Uruguay as a Question
From Alienation to Integration: Intellectuals, Politics & Polemics
From FIDEL to the Frente: The Uruguayan Left Looks for Someone to Talk to
Dialogue Engaged: The Frente Amplio as Coalition Interlude: The Armed Forces and Failure
The Revenge of the Foreign: Uruguay on the Eve of De(con)struction
Dialogue Resumed: Democracy, Intellectuals and the Frente Amplio in Post-Dictatorship Uruguay
Dialogue Outside Politics: Uruguay as Problem in the Twenty-first Century
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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