Catalogue


The darker side of light : arts of privacy, 1850-1900 /
Peter Parshall ; with S. Hollis Clayton, Christiane Hertel, and Nicholas Penny.
imprint
Washington : National Gallery of Art, 2009.
description
xi, 180 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
ISBN
1848220219 (alk. paper : museum ed.), 9781848220218 (alk. paper : museum ed.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington : National Gallery of Art, 2009.
isbn
1848220219 (alk. paper : museum ed.)
9781848220218 (alk. paper : museum ed.)
contents note
A darker side of light: prints, privacy, and possession / Peter Parshall -- Looking within the cell of privacy / S. Hollis Clayson -- The world inside: privacy according to Klinger, Liebermann, and Kollwitz / Christiane Hertel -- Sculpture and privacy / Nicholas Penny.
general note
"In association with Lund Humphries."
Issued in connection with an exhibition held April 5-June 28, 2009, Armand Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, October 1, 2009-January 31, 2010, National Gallery of Art, Washington, and February 18-June 10, 2010, Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago.
catalogue key
6718298
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 152-170) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
For many today, the art of the late nineteenth century is dominated by Impressionism and Post-impressionism. By explicating a range of highly engaging, often mysterious and beautiful prints, drawings and small sculptures, The Darker Side of Light evokes the shadowed interiors and private introspections that compose a far less familiar history of late nineteenth century art.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-09-01:
Published as an exhibition catalogue, this volume breaks new ground in thinking about the whys and wherefores of private viewing and collecting, the influence of collectors on art production and taste and vice versa, and the intrusions of history. The first of four essays is by Parshall (National Gallery), who conceived the project. It dwells on the unconventional nature of prints offered collectors, the role of taste-prescribing manuals, and the 19th-century shift in sensibilities. The second essay, by S. Hollis Clayson (Northwestern), deals with psychological interiority in relation to women and domestic interiors in France. For the third, Christiane Hertel (Bryn Mawr) examines privacy in the context of politics and art theory in Germany (Klinger, Kollwitz, Liebermann); finally, Penny (English National Gallery) calls attention to the intimacies in the experience of late 19th-century small sculptures. Weighed down by sometimes difficult formulations, allusions, comparisons, and language, this publication will appeal more to scholars than the general public. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and above. E. E. Hirshler emeritus, Denison University
Appeared in Library Journal on 2009-06-15:
Issued in connection with a traveling exhibition organized by the National Gallery of Art (Washington, DC), this is a tribute to late 19th-century collecting, display or concealment, and private enjoyment of prints, drawings, and watercolors as well as small objects such as cameos, coins, medals, and small sculpture. While Parshall (curator, old master prints, National Gallery) is a prolific Renaissance scholar, the other contributors' areas of expertise run closer to this subject: S. Hollis Clayson (art history, Northwestern Univ.) authored Painted Love: Prostitution in French Art of the Impressionist Era, Christiane Hertel (art history, Bryn Mawr Coll.) has written on the history of collecting and collections, and Nicholas Penny (director, National Gallery, London) has published much in the areas of sculpture and the history of taste and collecting. VERDICT Just as the title is sophisticated in its ironic play on words and ideas, so are the essays. Complete with extensive endnotes and a checklist of works that corresponds both to the catalog and to the exhibition, this is a great read that is also serious and beautiful. For readers interested in works on paper (prints and drawings) and the history of art collecting, specifically of the late 19th century.-Jennifer Pollock, Coll. of DAAP Lib., Univ. of Cincinnati (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, June 2009
Choice, September 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
For many today, the art of the late nineteenth century is dominated by Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. However, this is only the better-known part of the story, a story retold within the pages of this captivating book with its finely executed works of art and the insightful essays that accompany them.For collectors the experience of prints, drawings, and small sculptures was often a private affair, like taking a book down from the shelf for quiet enjoyment. Prints and drawings were kept aside, compiled in albums and portfolios, while medals and bronzes were often placed in the seclusion of the library. In short, such works of art were not typically a part of one's day-to-day environment in the manner of a framed object hung on a wall. Rather, they were subject to purposeful study on chosen occasions. From the beginning this element of discreteness allowed for degrees of experiment leading artists to sometimes recherché, sometimes enigmatic, and often melancholy subjects that indulged the solitary circumstances of their reception.By explicating a range of highly engaging, often mysterious and beautiful objects, The Darker Side of Light evokes the shadowed interiors and private introspections that compose a far less familiar history of late nineteenth-century art.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Many prints of the 19th century were on the leading edge of social observation and psychological suggestion, and occasionally drifted into the investigation of deviance. This book brings the shadowed interior into full focus and so presents an account of the less familiar story of late 19th-century art.
Main Description
For many today, the art of the late 19th century is dominated by Impressionism and Post-impressionism. By explicating a range of highly engaging, often mysterious and beautiful prints, drawings and small sculptures, The Darker Side of Light evokes the shadowed interiors and private introspections that compose a far less familiar history of late 19th-century art.

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