Catalogue


A world of trouble : the White House and the Middle East from the Cold War to the War on Terror /
Patrick Tyler.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2009.
description
628 p.
ISBN
0374292892 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780374292898 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2009.
isbn
0374292892 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780374292898 (hardcover : alk. paper)
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
6712344
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2009-01-22:
Verdict: A unique combination of policy analysis and historical narrative that illuminates the personalities and politics at the heart of U.S.-Middle East relations. A vital volume for both general and specialized readers. Background: Journalist Tyler critiques American involvement in the Middle East in a comprehensive analysis of issues from recent decades, including growing recognition of Palestinian rights, ongoing tension with Iran, and the war in Iraq. He creates a coherent story from a diffuse series of developments and crises in the region, drawing on a wide range of archives and his own decades of reporting. Tyler's effort is an important reminder of the strategic importance of the region and the necessity for consistent American engagement.-Elizabeth Hayford, former president, Assoc. Colls. of the Midwest, Evanston, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2008-11-03:
In this epic, remarkably readable history of U.S. involvement in the Middle East from Eisenhower to Bush II, Washington Post reporter Tyler uses an up-close, journalistic style to depict the power struggles and compromises that have defined the past half-century. Tyler focuses on key turning points in U.S.-Middle East relations and documents the conversations and real-time decision-making processes of the presidents, cabinet members and other key figures. Readers are treated to an intimate view of Eisenhower's careful, steady diplomacy during the Suez crisis, Kissinger's egocentric and fateful decision to fully arm Israel in the October war of 1973 while Nixon struggled through the Watergate scandal, and the tangled web of communication and intentional deceit during the Reagan administration that led to the Iran-Contra scandal. Tyler makes the issues and relationships clear without resorting to oversimplification or ideological grandstanding, and his journalistic instincts steer him toward direct quotation and telling anecdotes rather than generalization. Readers in the market for an examination of how leadership has embroiled the U.S. in the Middle East are well-advised to consult this riveting text. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Library Journal, September 2008
Publishers Weekly, November 2008
Library Journal, January 2009
New York Times Full Text Review, October 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The White House and the Middle Eastfrom the Cold War to the War on TerrorThe Middle East is the beginning and the end of U.S. foreign policy: events there influence our alliances, make or break presidencies, govern the price of oil, and draw us into war. But it was not always soand as Patrick Tyler shows in this thrilling chronicle of American misadventures in the region, the story of American presidents' dealings there is one of mixed motives, skulduggery, deceit, and outright foolishness, as well as of policymaking and diplomacy.Tyler draws on newly opened presidential archives to dramatize the approach to the Middle East across U.S. presidencies from Eisenhower to George W. Bush. He takes us into the Oval Office and shows how our leaders made momentous decisions; at the same time, the sweep of this narrativefrom the Suez crisis to the Iran hostage crisis to George W. Bush's catastrophe in Iraqlets us see the big picture as never before. Tyler tells a story of presidents being drawn into the affairs of the region against their will, being kept in the dark by local potentates, being led astray by grasping subordinates, and making decisions about the internal affairs of countries they hardly understand. Above all, he shows how each president has managed to undo the policies of his predecessor, often fomenting both anger against America on the streets of the region and confusion at home.A World of Troubleis the Middle East book we need now: compulsively readable, free of cant and ideology, and rich in insight about the very human challenges a new president will face as he or she tries to restore America's standing in the region.
Main Description
The White House and the Middle East - from the Cold War to the War on Terror The Middle East is the beginning and the end of U.S. foreign policy: events there influence our alliances, make or break presidencies, govern the price of oil, and draw us into war. But it was not always so - and as Patrick Tyler shows in this thrilling chronicle of American misadventures in the region, the story of American presidents' dealings there is one of mixed motives, skulduggery, deceit, and outright foolishness, as well as of policymaking and diplomacy.Tyler draws on newly opened presidential archives to dramatize the approach to the Middle East across U.S. presidencies from Eisenhower to George W. Bush. He takes us into the Oval Office and shows how our leaders made momentous decisions; at the same time, the sweep of this narrative - from the Suez crisis to the Iran hostage crisis to George W. Bush's catastrophe in Iraq - lets us see the big picture as never before. Tyler tells a story of presidents being drawn into the affairs of the region against their will, being kept in the dark by local potentates, being led astray by grasping subordinates, and making decisions about the internal affairs of countries they hardly understand. Above all, he shows how each president has managed to undo the policies of his predecessor, often fomenting both anger against America on the streets of the region and confusion at home. A World of Trouble is the Middle East book we need now: compulsively readable, free of cant and ideology, and rich in insight about the very human challenges a new president will face as he or she tries to restore America's standing in the region.
Main Description
The White House and the Middle East-from the Cold War to the War on Terror The Middle East is the beginning and the end of U.S. foreign policy: events there influence our alliances, make or break presidencies, govern the price of oil, and draw us into war. But it was not always so-and as Patrick Tyler shows in this thrilling chronicle of American misadventures in the region, the story of American presidents' dealings there is one of mixed motives, skulduggery, deceit, and outright foolishness, as well as of policymaking and diplomacy.Tyler draws on newly opened presidential archives to dramatize the approach to the Middle East across U.S. presidencies from Eisenhower to George W. Bush. He takes us into the Oval Office and shows how our leaders made momentous decisions; at the same time, the sweep of this narrative-from the Suez crisis to the Iran hostage crisis to George W. Bush's catastrophe in Iraq-lets us see the big picture as never before. Tyler tells a story of presidents being drawn into the affairs of the region against their will, being kept in the dark by local potentates, being led astray by grasping subordinates, and making decisions about the internal affairs of countries they hardly understand. Above all, he shows how each president has managed to undo the policies of his predecessor, often fomenting both anger against America on the streets of the region and confusion at home. A World of Trouble is the Middle East book we need now: compulsively readable, free of cant and ideology, and rich in insight about the very human challenges a new president will face as he or she tries to restore America's standing in the region.
Main Description
The White House and the Middle Eastfrom the Cold War to the War on Terror The Middle East is the beginning and the end of U.S. foreign policy: events there influence our alliances, make or break presidencies, govern the price of oil, and draw us into war. But it was not always soand as Patrick Tyler shows in this thrilling chronicle of American misadventures in the region, the story of American presidents' dealings there is one of mixed motives, skulduggery, deceit, and outright foolishness, as well as of policymaking and diplomacy. Tyler draws on newly opened presidential archives to dramatize the approach to the Middle East across U.S. presidencies from Eisenhower to George W. Bush. He takes us into the Oval Office and shows how our leaders made momentous decisions; at the same time, the sweep of this narrativefrom the Suez crisis to the Iran hostage crisis to George W. Bush's catastrophe in Iraqlets us see the big picture as never before. Tyler tells a story of presidents being drawn into the affairs of the region against their will, being kept in the dark by local potentates, being led astray by grasping subordinates, and making decisions about the internal affairs of countries they hardly understand. Above all, he shows how each president has managed to undo the policies of his predecessor, often fomenting both anger against America on the streets of the region and confusion at home. A World of Trouble is the Middle East book we need now: compulsively readable, free of cant and ideology, and rich in insight about the very human challenges a new president will face as he or she tries to restore America's standing in the region.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prologue: America in the Middle Eastp. 3
The Arab Awakening: Eisenhower, Nasser, and Suezp. 19
The Six-Day War: Johnson and Israelp. 64
Nixon and Brezhnev: Cold War and International Terrorp. 107
Nixon and Kissinger: Yom Kippur-The October Warp. 135
Jimmy Carter: Camp David and the Struggle with Menachem Beginp. 176
Carter and the Shah: Khomeini's Revolutionp. 210
The Shame of Lebanon: Reagan's Warriors in the Middle Eastp. 249
The Iran-Contra Affair: The Clash of Saudi and Israeli Influencep. 308
Nebuchadnezzar-Land: Saddam Hussein and the Persian Gulf Warp. 352
Bill Clinton: Tilting at Peace, Flailing at Saddamp. 402
Clinton: Flight from Terror; Lost Peacep. 457
George W. Bush: A World of Troublep. 525
Notesp. 557
Acknowledgmentsp. 607
Indexp. 611
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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