Catalogue


An assessment of the SBIR program at the Department of Energy /
Committee for Capitalizing on Science, Technology, and Innovation: An Assessment of the Small Business Innovation Research Program ; Policy and Global Affairs, Charles W. Wessner, editor ; National Research Council of the National Academies.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, c2008.
description
xvii, 236 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0309114128, 9780309114127
format(s)
Book
Holdings
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program is one of the largest examples of U.S. public-private partnerships. Founded in 1982, SBIR was designed to encourage small business to develop new processes and products and to provide quality research in support of the many missions of the U.S. government, including health, energy, the environment, and national defense. In response to a request from the U.S. Congress, the National Research Council assessed SBIR as administered by the five federal agencies that together make up 96 percent of program expenditures. This book, one of six in the series, reports on the SBIR program at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and finds that the program is making significant progress in achieving the Congressional goals for the program. Keeping in mind NASA's unique mission and the recent significant changes to the program, the committee found the SBIR program to be sound in concept and effective in practice at NASA.. The book recommends programmatic changes that should make the SBIR program even more effective in achieving its legislative goals.
Long Description
The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program is one of the largest examples of U.S. public-private partnerships. Founded in 1982, SBIR was designed to encourage small business to develop new processes and products and to provide quality research in support of the many missions of the U.S. government, including health, energy, the environment, and national defense. In response to a request from the U.S. Congress, the National Research Council assessed SBIR as administered by the five federal agencies that together make up 96 percent of program expenditures. This book, one of six in the series, reports on the SBIR program at the Department of Energy. It finds that, in spite of resource constraints, the DoE has made significant progress in meeting the legislative objectives of SBIR and that the program is effectively addressing the mission of the Department of Energy. The book documents the achievements and challenges of the program and recommends programmatic changes to make the SBIR program even more effective in achieving its legislative goals.
Main Description
The Small Business Innovation Research program, created in 1982, allocates 2.5% of 11 federal agencies' RD budgets to fund RD projects by small businesses. The program now makes awards of over $2 billion annually Despite the size and longevity of the program, it has been subject to relatively little assessment.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xiii
Summaryp. 1
Introductionp. 11
SBIR Creation and Assessmentp. 11
SBIR Program Structurep. 12
SBIR Reauthorizationsp. 13
Structure of the NRC Studyp. 14
SBIR Assessment Challengesp. 15
Assessing SBIR at the Department of Energy (DoE)p. 19
Surveys of DoE SBIR Award-recipient Companiesp. 19
Case Studiesp. 21
Structure of the Reportp. 24
Findings and Recommendationsp. 25
Award Statisticsp. 42
Trends in Energy Research and Developmentp. 43
Size of Individual Awardsp. 45
Phase I Awardsp. 46
Phase II Awardsp. 47
Geographic Concentrationp. 47
Multiple-Award Winnersp. 50
SBIR Award Clustering to Support Technology Developmentp. 52
Development Funding Prior to SBIR Awardp. 54
Commercializationp. 56
Challenges of Commercializationp. 56
Project Statusp. 57
Project Discontinuationp. 58
Sales and Licensingp. 58
Skew Effectsp. 59
Sales Expectations and Likely Future Salesp. 59
Licensingp. 61
Customersp. 61
Marketingp. 62
Additional Development Fundingp. 62
Further Investment: Phase III at DoEp. 64
DoE SBIR and Venture Capital (VCs)p. 64
Equity Investments from Large Corporationsp. 65
Other Resourcesp. 65
Matching Funds and Cost-sharingp. 66
Non-SBIR Federal Fundingp. 66
Employment Effectsp. 66
Phase I Commercializationp. 67
Commercialization Resulting from the Phase I Projectsp. 67
Follow-on Development Funding Resulting from the Phase I Projectsp. 68
Other Benefits of Phase I-only Projectsp. 69
Multiple-Award Winnersp. 70
Agency Missionp. 72
Managing a Program with Multiple Objectivesp. 72
Alignment Issues for SBIR and the DoE Missionp. 74
Research vs. Commercial Culturep. 74
SBIR as a Taxp. 74
Administrative Burdensp. 74
Changing Perceptions of SBIRp. 75
Supporting Program Missionsp. 75
Providing Research Qualityp. 75
Research Impactp. 76
Comparative Research Valuep. 77
Project Ownershipp. 77
Capitalizing on Program Flexibilityp. 78
Balancing Commercialization and Mission Orientationp. 78
Internal Reallocation of Topics Among Programsp. 79
Woman- and Minority-Owned Businessesp. 80
Woman-owned Businessesp. 80
Minority-owned Businessesp. 81
Success Rates for the Different Groupsp. 82
Knowledge Effectsp. 85
Publications and Intellectual Propertyp. 85
Stimulating New Researchp. 86
Building Partnerships and Enhancing Networksp. 87
SBIR and the Universitiesp. 88
Program Managementp. 90
SBIR in the Department of Energyp. 90
Resources for Program Administrationp. 93
Topic Generationp. 94
Award Selectionp. 95
First-step Technical Reviewp. 95
Initial Review Approachesp. 96
1995 Process Revisionsp. 97
Fairness of Competitionp. 97
Outreachp. 98
The Application and Award Process: Awardee Commentsp. 98
Managing Information on Awardsp. 99
Reporting Requirementsp. 99
Freedom of Information Actp. 99
Program Structurep. 100
Differences Between Agenciesp. 100
Award Limitsp. 100
Time Framesp. 100
Gaps between SBIR Phase I and Phase II Fundingp. 101
Participation of DoE National Laboratories in SBIRp. 101
Overview of DoE National Laboratoriesp. 101
Why SBIR Collaborations Are Not More Frequentp. 102
Developments in Program Administration Since 2003p. 103
Online Capabilities and Plansp. 103
Program Manager Given More Controlp. 104
Phase II Supplemental Awardsp. 104
Actions Taken by DoE SBIR Program to Encourage Commercializationp. 105
Evidence of Commercialization Included in Phase II Criteriap. 105
Commercialization Assistance Services for SBIR Awardeesp. 105
Collecting Phase III Datap. 108
Recognizing Successp. 110
Appendixes
Doe SBIR Program Datap. 113
NRC Phase II Surveyp. 135
NRC Phase I Surveyp. 155
Case Studiesp. 165
Airak, Inc.p. 165
Atlantia Offshore Limitedp. 170
Creare, Inc.p. 176
Diversified Technologies, Inc.p. 185
Eltron Research, Inc.p. 193
IPIX, Inc.p. 199
NanoSonic, Inc.p. 204
NexTech Materials, Inc.p. 209
Princeton Polymer Laboratories, Inc.p. 216
Thunderhead Engineeringp. 221
Bibliographyp. 227
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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