Catalogue


Yugoslavia : a state that withered away /
Dejan Jović.
imprint
West Lafayette, Ind. : Purdue University Press, c2009.
description
xii, 419 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1557534950, 9781557534958
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
West Lafayette, Ind. : Purdue University Press, c2009.
isbn
1557534950
9781557534958
contents note
Analytical approaches to studying the disintegration of Yugoslavia -- The Kardelj concept : constructing the fourth Yugoslavia (1974-1990) -- The constitutional debate 1967-1974 : why did Serbia accept the Kardelj concept and the 1974 constitution? -- The economic crisis : the (lack of) response of the Yugoslav political elite to economic crisis in the early 1980s -- The political system reexamined : the Serbian question and the rise of the defenders and reformers of the constitution (1974-1984) -- The emergence of alternative concepts and the reaction of the political elite in Serbia (1984-1988) -- Slovenia and Serbia : the final years of Yugoslavia (1988-1990).
catalogue key
6707624
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 375-408) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-08-01:
Jovic (Univ. of Stirling, UK) makes an impressive and very persuasive argument that the seeds of Yugoslavia's demise were sown in the very founding philosophies of Yugoslav communist party elites. The central character in the author's analysis is surprisingly not Tito, but Edvard Kardelj, the Slovenian theorist whose ideas guided the post-WW II Yugoslav experiment. The Yugoslav communists and Kardelj took Marxism seriously and over time evolved an anti-statist orientation that assured the withering away of the state and the decentralizing processes inherent in the philosophy of self-management. Furthermore, the weakening of the state was accompanied by the move from a federal to a confederal arrangement by the time Tito died. The extraordinary effort in this volume reflects a detailed and comprehensive history of party meetings, decisions, and speeches by leaders that spans four decades. This is clearly elite analysis at its best. Other factors that precipitated the disintegration of the Yugoslav state are briefly but clearly addressed and put into the author's perspective. One factor, however, that is almost completely disregarded is the ethnocultural dimension that certainly was an important element in Yugoslavia's destruction. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. S. Majstorovic University of Wisconsin--Eau Claire
Reviews
Review Quotes
Yugoslavia: A State that Withered Away by Dejan Jovic´. West Lafayette IN: Purdue University Press, 2009. 419pp., £49.95, ISBN 978 1 55753 495 8 Dejan Jovic´ is Director of the Centre for European Neighbourhood Studies at the University of Stirling, Scotland and currently an adviser to the president of the Republic of Croatia, and consequently his book stands out as an indispensable work on the collapse of socialist Yugoslavia. The volume primarily focuses on analysing the ideological and constitutive aspects of the Yugoslav state, and it argues that ideological crisis was the key cause for the Yugoslav dissolution. The author proffers an innovative and well-argued account of the Marxist notion of the 'withering away of the state' by analysing the emergence, implementation, crisis and collapse of this ideological notion in socialist Yugoslavia. Interestingly, he approaches the topic first by presenting and criticising existing explanations for the break-up ofYugoslavia before finding them inadequate and continuing by arguing and substantiating his own views on ideological crisis and collapse. Thus Jovic´ successfully presents a critique of other approaches to theYugoslav dissolution and also examines theYugoslav case in historical perspective from three particular standpoints: adoption of the last constitutional compromise of 1974, the implementation crisis of the respective constitutive model and, finally, the roots of the 1980s ideological disintegration that instituted the Yugoslav downfall. This contribution on Yugoslavia is certainly a success because the author has managed to offer a markedly different view of the Yugoslav crisis and downfall, thus raising an important critique and re-evaluating already accepted and established accounts on Yugoslavia. Most notably, Jovic´ rejects the very popular, and certainly widely perceived, factor of ancient ethnic hatreds, among other things, as having led to the break-up. Yugoslavia: A State that Withered Away is an innovative piece, especially if other volumes covering the same topic are taken into consideration. The author's skilfully conducted analysis supported by a multitude of sources official documents as well as his personal archives from the time when he was a journalist offers a challenging and well-substantiated approach to Yugoslavia by advancing innovative thinking on the topic. The book is well written and easy to follow, and consequently will be of interest to an audience much wider than mere academic circles. Vladimir D¯ orËevic´ (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic) The BOOK REVIEWS 293 © 2012 The Authors. Political Studies Review © 2012 Political Studies Association Political Studies Review: 2012, 10(2)
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2009
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work argues that the disintegration of Yugoslavia was the result of many factors, not of a single one, but the primary one was commitment of the Yugoslav political elite to the Marxist ideology of 'withering away of the state'. This book reconstructs the elite's motives and reasons for the actions that led to state collapse.
Main Description
The disintegration of Yugoslavia was the result of many factors, not of a single one, but the primary one, the author argues, was commitment of the Yugoslav political elite to the Marxist ideology of withering away of the state. Ideology had a central place in Yugoslav politics. The trend of decentralization of Yugoslavia was not primarily motivated by reasons of ethnic politics, but by Marxist beliefs that the state should be decentralized and weakened until it was finally replaced by a self-managing society, especially the case during the extended period of the last 15 years before the actual breakdown of the Yugoslav socialist federation. Yugoslavia: A State that Withered Away examines the emergence, implementation, crisis, and the breakdown of the fourth (Kardelj's) constitutive concept of Yugoslavia (1974-1990), and relations between anti-statist ideology of self-management and the actual collapse of state institutions.
Table of Contents
Analytical approaches to studying the disintegration of Yugoslavia
The Kardelj concept: constructing the fourth Yugoslavia (1974-1990)
The constitutional debate 1967-1974: Why did Serbia accept the Kardelj concept and the 1974 constitution?
The economic crisis: the (lack of) response of the Yugoslav political elite to economic crisis in the early 1980s
The political system reexamined: the Serbian question and the rise of the defenders and reformers of the constitution (1974-1984)
The emergence of alternative concepts and the reaction of the political elite in Serbia (1984-1988)
Slovenia and Serbia: the final years of Yugoslavia (1988-1990)
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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