Catalogue


Who we are : a citizen's manifesto /
Rudyard Griffiths.
imprint
Vancouver : Douglas & McIntyre, c2009.
description
xv, 215 p.
ISBN
9781553651246
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Vancouver : Douglas & McIntyre, c2009.
isbn
9781553651246
local note
For Business (Rotman School of Management) - Joseph Rotman collection.
University College Library copy (Bennett Collection) is author's inscribed presentation copy to Avie Bennett.
catalogue key
6706884
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-02-01:
Members of the "academic fringe"--as Griffiths (Dominion Institute) refers to those who subscribe to an inclusive (rather than exclusive) definition of Canada--who believe the nation is better served by celebrating difference will find this book highly problematic and troubling. However, if one believes that Canada should subscribe to a conservative ethnic nationalism that rallies around "a strong national identity based on shared institutions," this book will be proverbial. Griffiths calls for Canadians to adopt a limited, boxed notion of who they are. The author asks Canadians to rally around one identity and proposes this be achieved, in part, by eliminating the possibility for citizens to hold more than one passport. Griffith's argument is nothing new. Similar calls have been made frequently in the past, mostly by the same people who praise Griffiths on the book's jacket (J. L. Granatstein, Andrew Cohen, Margaret Wente, et al.). This work will appeal to the burgeoning groups of conservative flag-waving Canadian nationalists that have sprung up in numbers since the Quebec Referendum in 1995. But such unwillingness to recognize and make room for diversity may ultimately be the undoing of Canada, despite Griffiths' and others' efforts to the contrary. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers, lower-division undergraduates, and above. B. F. R. Edwards Mount Allison University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A genuine cri de coeur...for a new and better Canada written by one of the brightest stars of the rising generation."
"A must-read for every Canadian concerned about where we are headed as a nation."
"An eloquent and hard-headed argument for reinventing a shared vision of what it means to be Canadian."
"[ Griffiths ] book melds logical clarity with truly excellent prose."
"In his new book Who We Are ... Rudyard Griffiths challenges Canadians to rediscover the founding principals of Canadian nationhood and revitalize our sense of citizenship."
"In this provocative work, Griffiths argues that at this critical juncture Canadians need to rediscover our country's founding principles -- robust civic values and social solidarity -- so that we can create a movement of passionate citizenship, one which will keep us accountable not just to our neighbourhoods and cities, but to our country."
" Who We Are: A Citizen's Manifesto isn't only about who we are but also about who, in Griffiths opinion, we ought to be."
" Who We Are is a bold and sometimes provocative book: while rejecting crude nationalism, Griffiths insists that multicultural Canada in a complicated, often volatile world is best served by a more robust idea of citizenship and a stronger allegiance to its traditions and institutions...it is...the starting point of a conversation that we can only ignore at our peril."
" Who We Are 's diagnosis of the postnational predicament is compelling, refreshing and highly relevant...While Who We Are doesn't present all the answers, it does us an enormous service by opening up the debate. Taking on myths might seem very un-Canadian, but in writing this book, Griffiths distinguishes himself as one of the very best Canadians of his generation."
This item was reviewed in:
Globe & Mail, March 2009
Quill & Quire, April 2009
Choice, February 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
A passionate call for Canadians to take stock and reengage with our country and its values before we falter as a nation. Canadians have come to embrace their country as a "postmodern state"-a nation that downplays its history and makes few demands on its citizens, allowing them to find their allegiances where they may -- in their region, their ethnic heritage or the language they speak. The notion of a national identity, with shared responsibilities and a common purpose, is considered out of date, even a disadvantage in a borderless world of transnational economies, resurgent regions and global immigration. In this timely and provocative book, Rudyard Griffiths argues that this vision of Canada is an intellectual and practical dead end. Without a strong national identity and robust civic values, the country will be hard pressed to meet the daunting challenges that lie ahead: the social costs of an aging population, the unavoidable effects of global warming and the fallout of a dysfunctional immigration system. What's needed is a rediscovery of the founding principles that made Canada the nation it is today, core values that can form a civic creed for our own times. In a passionate call to revitalize our shared citizenship, Griffiths reminds us of who we are, what we've accomplished and why a loyalty beyond the local and personal is essential for our nation's survival.
Main Description
A passionate call for Canadians to take stock and reengage with our country and its values before we falter as a nation. Canadians have come to embrace their country as a "postmodern state"-a nation that downplays its history and makes few demands on its citizens, allowing them to find their allegiances where they may -- in their region, their ethnic heritage or the language they speak. The notion of a national identity, with shared responsibilities and a common purpose, is considered out of date, even a disadvantage in a borderless world of transnational economies, resurgent regions and global immigration. In this timely and provocative book, Rudyard Griffithsargues that this vision of Canada is an intellectual and practical dead end. Without a strong national identity and robust civic values, the country will be hard pressed to meet the daunting challenges that lie ahead: the social costs of an aging population, the unavoidable effects of global warming and the fallout of a dysfunctional immigration system. What's needed is a rediscovery of the founding principles that made Canada the nation it is today, core values that can form a civic creed for our own times. In a passionate call to revitalize our shared citizenship, Griffiths reminds us of who we are, what we've accomplished and why a loyalty beyond the local and personal is essential for our nation's survival.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. ix
Nation or Notion?p. 1
The Unencumbered Countryp. 27
Future Shocksp. 51
Passage to Canadap. 74
First Principlesp. 96
Canada Found-and Lostp. 121
Our Third Imaginingp. 148
A Confession and a Proposalp. 175
Acknowledgementsp. 152
Notesp. 184
Selected Bibliographyp. 197
Indexp. 202
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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