Catalogue


Obesity in America, 1850-1939 : a history of social attitudes and treatment /
Kerry Segrave.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2008.
description
v, 202 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0786441208 (softcover : alk. paper), 9780786441204 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2008.
isbn
0786441208 (softcover : alk. paper)
9780786441204 (softcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Obesity emerges, slightly, 1850-1879 -- Psychology and effects, 1880-1919 -- Oddities, sports, clubs, employment, 1880-1919 -- Causes and cures, 1880-1919 -- Reducing, diets, and exercise, 1880-1919 -- Style and prevalence, 1880-1919 -- Psychology and effects, 1920-1939 -- Oddities, sports, clubs, employment, 1920-1939 -- Causes and effects, 1920-1939 -- Reducing, diets, and exercise, 1920-1939 -- Style, prevalence, and statistics, 1920-1939.
abstract
"This study concentrates on how the condition of obesity was viewed, studied, and treated from 1850 to 1939. It examines the images and stereotypes that were associated with fatness, the various remedies that were proposed for the condition, and the often bizarre theories that were proposed to explain obesity"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
6706052
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 189-196) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Veteran entertainment-media researcher Kerry Segrave is the author of numerous works of social history from McFarland
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-03-01:
Obesity was outside the public view in the US at the start of the period this book examines. As Segrave (independent scholar) notes, it was a relatively new phenomenon and poorly understood--tap water was thought to be fattening. By 1939, obesity was sufficiently widespread to be a public health issue. Theories on how to treat obesity became more sophisticated, as did awareness of increased morbidity and correlated conditions like diabetes and high blood pressure. Unfortunately, Segrave catalogs trends and treatment regimes with little analysis or context. The chapters are entertaining lists of curiosities, quackery, and trivia; the book features many examples of daily diets. It does not explain the various historical periods well, or link them to specific events that might help readers make sense of the mass of details provided. The brief introduction summarizes the volume succinctly, but fails to offer a framework for the "social attitudes" described in the text, where citations and references to popular media indicate thorough research. This volume is a missed opportunity to set the stage for the many studies that explore obesity today, and the havoc it wreaks on society and individuals alike. Summing Up: Optional. Researchers and general readers. A. B. Audant CUNY Kingsborough Community College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2009
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study concentrates on how the condition of obesity was viewed, studied, and treated from 1850 to 1939. It examines the images and stereotypes that were associated with fatness, the various remedies that were proposed for the condition, and the often bizarre theories that were proposed to explain obesity.
Description for Library
"This study concentrates on how the condition of obesity was viewed, studied, and treated from 1850 to 1939. It examines the images and stereotypes that were associated with fatness, the various remedies that were proposed for the condition, and the often bizarre theories that were proposed to explain obesity"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
This is a study of obesity in America from 1850 to 1939, concentrating on how the condition was viewed, studied, and treated. It examines the images and stereotypes that were associated with fatness, the various remedies that were proposed for the condition, and the often bizarre theories used to explain it, including the idea that ordinary tap water was fattening. From about 1850 to 1879, obesity existed almost exclusively among the upper class, and it received very little medical attention. From 1880 to 1919, doctors, scientists, and other health professionals began to present a coherent theory of obesity. By 1920, the condition was recognized as a big enough health issue that various groups, ranging from private employers to public health officials, began developing some of the nation's first organized weight reduction programs.
Main Description
This is a study of obesity in America from 1850 to 1939, concentrating on how the condition was viewed, studied, and treated. It examines the images and stereotypes that were associated with fatness, the various remedies that were proposed for the condition, and the often bizarre theories used to explain it, including the idea that ordinary tap water was fattening.From about 1850 to 1879, obesity existed almost exclusively among the upper class, and it received very little medical attention. From 1880 to 1919, doctors, scientists, and other health professionals began to present a coherent theory of obesity. By 1920, the condition was recognized as a big enough health issue that various groups, ranging from private employers to public health officials, began developing some of the nation's first organized weight reduction programs.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. 1
Obesity Emerges, Slightly, 1850-1879p. 3
Psychology and Effects, 1880-1919p. 18
Oddities, Sports, Clubs, Employment, 1880-1919p. 31
Causes and Cures, 1880-1919p. 48
Reducing, Diets, and Exercise, 1880-1919p. 71
Style and Prevalence, 1880-1919p. 110
Psychology and Effects, 1920-1939p. 116
Oddities, Sports, Clubs, Employment, 1920-1939p. 125
Causes and Effects, 1920-1939p. 132
Reducing, Diets, and Exercise, 1920-1939p. 139
Style, Prevalence, and Statistics, 1920-1939p. 159
Conclusionp. 168
Average Weights of Men and Women (1931)p. 175
Notesp. 177
Bibliographyp. 189
Indexp. 197
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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