Catalogue


Freedom from fear [electronic resource] : the American people in depression and war, 1929-1945 /
David M. Kennedy.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
description
xviii, 936 p., [32] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0195038347
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
isbn
0195038347
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
6689892
 
Electronic text and image data. Ann Arbor, Mich. : University of Michigan, Scholarly Publishing Office, 2004. Includes both TIFF files and keyword searchable text. ([ACLS Humanities E-Book]) Mode of access: Intranet. This volume is made possible by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
David M. Kennedy is Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History at Stanford University. He is the author of Over Here: The First World War and American Society, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and Birth Control in America: The Career of Margaret Sanger, which won the Bancroft Prize. He lives in Stanford, California.
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Ambassador Book Awards, USA, 2000 : Won
California Book Awards , USA, 2000 : Won
Francis Parkman Prize, USA, 2000 : Won
Los Angeles Times Book Prizes, USA, 1999 : Nominated
Pulitzer Prize, USA, 2000 : Won
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1999-04-05:
Rarely does a work of historical synthesis combine such trenchant analysis and elegant writing as does Kennedy's spectacular contribution to the Oxford History of the United States. A Stanford history professor and winner of the Bancroft Prize (for Birth Control in America: The Career of Margaret Sanger), Kennedy uses a wide canvas to depict all aspects of the American political, social and economic experience from 1929 to 1945. Throughout, he takes care to detail parts of the American story often neglected by more casual histories. For example, he introduces readers to the "old poor," the third of the country that had not prospered during the '20s and were among the most ravaged by the '30s. He also provides a stunningly original reinterpretation of the competing forces and interests that combined to shape the New Deal under FDR's direction. And he gives deliberate and enlightening attention to the "Great Debate" between isolationists and internationalists in the '30s. The book's final 400 pages admirably demonstrate exactly how the U.S. emerged victorious in WWII: not just through military prowess, but also through capably managed homefront economics and propaganda. Because of its scope, its insight and its purring narrative engine, Kennedy's book will stand for years to come as the definitive history of the most important decades of the American century. 48 halftones; 10 linecuts. 50,000 first printing; first serial to the Atlantic Monthly; History Book Club main selection; author tour. (May) FYI: Previous volumes in the Oxford History of the United States are Robert Middlekauff's The Glorious Cause, James M. McPherson's Pulitzer Prize-winning Battle Cry of Freedom and James T. Patterson's Bancroft Prize-winning Grand Expectations. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Choice on 1999-10-01:
Kennedy's book is the most illuminating, riveting, comprehensive, and graceful one-volume history of this nation's experiences during the Great Depression, New Deal, and WW II published to date. In a superb combination of historiographic synthesis, trenchant interpretation, and unusually elegant prose, Kennedy explains the economic weaknesses of the Depression-era US, the political compromises inherent in the drafting of the Social Security Act, the underlying agonies of Lend Lease, and a wartime meeting of the Big Three with the same intimacy, dramatic command, and patience that FDR brought to his Fireside Chats. This is social, political, diplomatic, and military history written magisterially with broad but nuanced strokes across a 16-year span that utterly transformed the lives of Americans and the world. Security and stability, Kennedy reminds readers, were the touchstones of the New Deal and, ultimately, of an American foreign policy that mobilized the nation's economic abundance, scientific prowess, and democratic yearnings in behalf of "the last good war." Librarians should order this book for their libraries, faculty members should assign it, and everyone should read it. All levels. E. M. Tobin Hamilton College
Appeared in Library Journal on 1999-03-15:
With this history of the Depression, New Deal, and World War II, Stanford University's Kennedy becomes the latest contributor to Oxford's distinguished series on U.S. history. Kennedy has a distinguished record of his own, with two acclaimed books, Birth Control in America: The Career of Margaret Sanger (LJ 8/70) and Over Here: The First World War and American Society (LJ 10/1/80). Displaying a literary craft uncommon in survey works, he has woven together narrative, sketches of character, and critical judgment to record and analyze the economic, political, social, and military events of these epic years. Readers who feel they live in an era of tumultuous change might well consult Kennedy's book. This account of the crucial struggles and events of the Depression and war years will lend perspective like few others. For all libraries.ÄRobert F. Nardini, North Chichester, NH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A grand historical synthesis...this is the kind of book prizes are made for."--Chicago Tribune "This is modern America''s story--modern America''s most thrilling, most irresistible, and most significant story--and in this massive volume, David M. Kennedy makes it his story in a way that no one has before.Freedom From Fear, the fourth installment of the new Oxford History of the United States to appear,is as much a triumph as its predecessors, providing every indication that the series, once completed, will stand as the most comprehensive and most compelling narrative history of the nation."--Boston Globe "Rarely does a work of historical synthesis combine such trenchant analysis and elegant writing as does Kennedy''s spectacular contribution to the Oxford History of the United States. Kennedy uses a wide canvas to depict all aspects of the American political, social and economic experience from 1929 to 1945. He also provides a stunningly original reinterpretation of the competing forces and interests that combined to shape the New Deal under FDR''s direction. The book''s final 400 pages admirably demonstrate exactly how the U.S. emerged victorious in WWII.... Because of its scope, its insight and its purring narrative engine, Kennedy''s book will stand for years to come asthe definitive history of the most important decades of the American Century."--Publishers Weekly "An engrossing narrative of a momentous time.The best one-volume account of the Roosevelt era currently available....Good old-fashioned history."--The New York Times Book Review "An indispensable account of the two great formative events of 20th century American history--the Great Depression and the second World War."--The Economist "The book...has my strong approval. As it will have, I cannot doubt, that of the many readers it deserves."--John C. Gilbraith,The Washington Monthly "An invaluable compendium of the hyperactive period that contains the Great depression and the Second World War."--The Washington Times "Kennedy''s book is the most illuminating, riveting, comprehensive, and graceful one-volume history of this nation''s experiences during the Great Depression, New Deal, and WWII published to date....This is social, political, dipolmatic, and military history written magisterially with broad but nuanced strokes across a 16-year span that utterly transformed the lives of Americans and the world.... Librarians should order this book for their libraries, faculty members should assign it, and everyone should read it."--Choice "Kennedy''s grasp of deep-rooted social problems and his enlightening, analytical style are very much in evidence.... [he] brilliantly explores the conflicting nuances of [Roosevelt''s] character and program.... Kennedy has achieved a judicious balance in his treatment of the Depression and the military operations and diplomatic maneuvers of World War II.His narrative style is in the grand tradition of American historical writing, an unfaltering display of clarity and detail."--Philadephia Inquirer "No other book so vividly captures the spirit of those 17 years that forever changed America."--Christian Science Monitor "One of our most broad-gauged American historians brings us that increasing rarity: a big book about a big subject.... The Stanford scholar takes on the job of tracing the American people through three of the most important and important and widely written about epochs in the century...and provides us with consistently original and sometimes startling conclusions."--The Washington Post "A major achievement in objective historical writing that should be a legacy to generations of students seeking authoritative reference material on the period."--Kirkus Reviews "David Kennedy...is absolutely masterfulin this literate and lively history of the American people in the Depression and World War II."--The Waterbury Republican-American "From its dramatic prelude depicting Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Adolf Hitler, and Joseph Stalin hearing the news of the end of World War I on November 11, 1918, to its moving climax on board the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay on September 2, 1945, this panoramic narrative pulses with life, color, incident, and action. We know how it all comes out, yet the fate of the nation seems to hang in the balance as Kennedy captures history''s throat-catching contingency." --Jack Beatty, author ofThe Rascal King: The Life and Times of James Michael CurleyandThe World According to PeterDrucker "We expect the best from David Kennedy and he will not disappoint anybody with this competent, complete and literate volume. Covering a time of large and intense change, it is all here. A major and thoroughly fine piece of work."--John Kenneth Galbraith Freedom from Fearbrings together in one place the epic story of how America faced the greatest challenges in its history. At a time when we tend to bemoan our selfish preoccupations, it is bracing to read David Kennedy''s moving account of our better selves. This is history the way it ought to be.-- Alan Wolfe, Boston University, author ofOne Nation After All "Displaying a literary craft uncommon in survey works, he has woven together narrative, sketches of character, and critical judgment to record and analyze the economic, political, social, and military events of these epic years.... This account of the crucial struggles and events of the Depression and war years will lend perspective like few others."--Library Journal "David Kennedy is one of America''s most distinguished historians, andFreedom from Fearis a remarkable achievement: deeply researched, insightful, and beautifully written. Fast-paced, it presents vivid portraits of major actors such as Roosevelt, Churchill, and Hitler, as well as of the hopes and fears of millions of lesser-known people caught up in the tumultuous years of the Great Depression and of World War II."--James T. Patterson, Bancroft Prize-winning author ofGrand Expectations
"An engrossing narrative of a momentous time. The best one-volume account of the Roosevelt era currently available.... Good old-fashioned history."--Barry Gewen, The New York Times Book Review "This is modern America's story--modern America's most thrilling, most irresistible, and most significant story--and in this massive volume, David M. Kennedy makes it his story in a way that no one has before. Freedom From Fear, the fourth installment of the new Oxford History of the United States to appear, is as much a triumph as its predecessors, providing every indication that the series, once completed, will stand as the most comprehensive and most compelling narrative history of the nation."--David M. Shribman, Boston Globe "A grand historical synthesis.... This is the kind of book prizes are made for."--Herbert Mitgang, Chicago Tribune "Rarely does a work of historical synthesis combine such trenchant analysis and elegant writing as does Kennedy's spectacular contribution to the Oxford History of the United States.... Will stand for years to come as the definitive history of the most important decades of the American century."--Publishers Weekly "No other book so vividly captures the spirit of those 17 years that forever changed America."--Richard A. Nenneman, Christian Science Monitor
"An engrossing narrative of a momentous time. The best one-volume account of the Roosevelt era currently available.... Good old-fashioned history."--Barry Gewen,The New York Times Book Review "This is modern America's story--modern America's most thrilling, most irresistible, and most significant story--and in this massive volume, David M. Kennedy makes it his story in a way that no one has before.Freedom From Fear, the fourth installment of the new Oxford History of the United States to appear, is as much a triumph as its predecessors, providing every indication that the series, once completed, will stand as the most comprehensive and most compelling narrative history of the nation."--David M. Shribman,Boston Globe "A grand historical synthesis.... This is the kind of book prizes are made for."--Herbert Mitgang,Chicago Tribune "Rarely does a work of historical synthesis combine such trenchant analysis and elegant writing as does Kennedy's spectacular contribution to the Oxford History of the United States.... Will stand for years to come as the definitive history of the most important decades of the American century."--Publishers Weekly "No other book so vividly captures the spirit of those 17 years that forever changed America."--Richard A. Nenneman,Christian Science Monitor
"David Kennedy is one of America's most distinguished historians, andFreedom from Fear is a remarkable achievement: deeply researched, insightful,and beautifully written. Fast-paced, it presents vivid portraits of majoractors such as Roosevelt, Churchill, and Hitler, as well as of the hopes andfears of millions of lesser-known people caught up in the tumultuous years ofthe Great Depression and of World War II."--James t. Patterson, BancroftPrize-sinning author of Grand Expectations
"David Kennedy is one of America's most distinguished historians, and Freedom from Fear is a remarkable achievement: deeply researched, insightful, and beautifully written. Fast-paced, it presents vivid portraits of major actors such as Roosevelt, Churchill, and Hitler, as well as of thehopes and fears of millions of lesser-known people caught up in the tumultuous years of the Great Depression and of World War II."--James T. Patterson, Bancroft Prize-winning author of Grand Expectations
"David Kennedy's Freedom from Fear is a masterful work of history coveringthe American people and their government through the eventful years 1929-1945,it rests on an extraordinary command of the historical literature about thatperiod. Kennedy's sprightly and lucid prose add force to his carefuljudgements, all fo them informed, some of them controversial. The book willappeal to all generations of Americans, perhaps especially to those who rememberthe Great Depression and World War II, but also to their children andgrandchildren. For all Americans still live with the persisting influence ofthose Experiences."--John Morton Blum, Sterling Professor of History Emeritus,Yale University
"David Kennedy's panoramic history of America and the world between 1929 and 1945 is a superb reconstruction of the era that formed our times. Simply put, it is a brilliant narrative and analysis. Anyone who wants to understand our century needs to read Kennedy's book."--Robert Dallek,Boston University, author of Flawed Giant: Lyndon Johnson and his Times, 1961-1973
"Displaying a literary craft uncommon in survey works, he has woventogether narrative, sketches of character, and critical judgment to record andanalyze the economic, political, social, and military events of these epicyears.... This account of the crucial struggles and events of the Depression andwar years will lend perspective like few others."--Library Journal
"Displaying a literary craft uncommon in survey works, he has woven together narrative, sketches of character, and critical judgment to record and analyze the economic, political, social, and military events of these epic years.... This account of the crucial struggles and events of theDepression and war years will lend perspective like few others."--Library Journal
Freedom from Fear brings together in one place the epic story of how America faced the greatest challenges in its history. At a time when we tend to bemoan our selfish preoccupations, it is bracing to read David Kennedy's moving account of our better selves. This is history the way it oughtto be.--Alan Wolfe, Boston College, author of One Nation After All
Freedom from Fear brings together in one place the epic story of howAmerica faced the greatest challenges in its history. At a time when we tend tobemoan our selfish preoccupations, it is bracing to read David Kennedy's movingaccount of our better selves. This is history the way it ought to be.-- AlanWolfe, Boston University, author of One Nation After All
"From its dramatic prelude depicting Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Adolf Hitler, and Joseph Stalin hearing the news of the end of World War I on November 11, 1918, to its moving climax on board the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay on September 2, 1945, this panoramic narrative pulses withlife, color, incident, and action. We know how it all comes out, yet the fate of the nation seems to hang in the balance as Kennedy captures history's throat-catching contingency." --Jack Beatty, author of The Rascal King: The Life and Times of James Michael Curley and The World According to PeterDrucker
"In Freedom from Fear, David Kennedy combines the synthetic talents of a brilliant historian with the literary gifts of a great storyteller. The result is engrossing history, with all the complex characters and suspense of high drama put impressively to the task of demonstrating how a decadeand a half of Great Depression and World War have shaped the rest of our century."--Lizabeth Cohen, Harvard University
"In Freedom from Fear, David Kennedy combines the synthetic talents of abrilliant historian with the literary gifts of a great storyteller. The resultis engrossing history, with all the complex characters and suspense of highdrama put impressivley to the task of demonstrating how a decade adn a half ofGreat Depression adn World War have shaped the rest of our century."--LizabethCohen, Harvard University
"It's hard to think of a more interesting time in American history thanthe years of the Great Depression adn the Second World War--or an historianbetter able to bring it to life than David Kennedy."--Evan Thomas--author of TheVery Best and co-author of The Wise Men:Five Friends and the World TheyMade
"It's hard to think of a more interesting time in American history than the years of the Great Depression and the Second World War--or an historian better able to bring it to life than David Kennedy."--Evan Thomas, author of The Very Best and co-author of The Wise Men:Five Friends and theWorld They Made
"Kennedy combines the best aspects of narrative and history. His wonderful single-volume history of the era is comprehensive and well researched, and scholars will find much that is new and informative.... It is a smoothly flowing and easily digestible account of great events, andwell-informed lay readers will have little difficulty in following and appreciating this saga.... This is a work replete with revealing subtexts, and Roosevelt's relations and struggles with African American leaders are especially fascinating. It is a worthy addition to an outstanding series and anessential component to a U.S. history collection for both public and college libraries."--Booklist
"This is an enormous book, heavy to carry and light and very agreeable toread.... Kennedy holds firmly the attention of the reader, conveying a sense ofboth serious care and competence, all in good, unassuming English.... Thebook...has my strong approval. As it will have, I cannot doubt, that of themany readers it deserves."--John Kenneth Galbraith, The WashingtonMonthly
"This is an enormous book, heavy to carry and light and very agreeable to read.... Kennedy holds firmly the attention of the reader, conveying a sense of both serious care and competence, all in good, unassuming English.... The book...has my strong approval. As it will have, I cannot doubt,that of the many readers it deserves."--John Kenneth Galbraith, The Washington Monthly
"We expect the best from David Kennedy and he will not disappoint anybody with this competent, complete and literate volume. Covering a time of large and intense change, it is all here. A major and thoroughly fine piece of work."--John Kenneth Galbraith
"From its dramatic prelude depicting Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Adolf Hitler, and Joseph Stalin hearing the news of the end of World War I on November 11, 1918, to its moving climax on board the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay on September 2, 1945, this panoramic narrative pulses with life, color, incident, and action. We know how it all comes out, yet the fate of the nation seems to hang in the balance as Kennedy captures history''s throat-catchingcontingency." --Jack Beatty, author of The Rascal King: The Life and Times of James Michael Curley and The World According to Peter Drucker"We expect the best from David Kennedy and he will not disappoint anybody with this competent, complete and literate volume. Covering a time of large and intense change, it is all here. A major and thoroughly fine piece of work."--John Kenneth GalbraithFreedom from Fear brings together in one place the epic story of how America faced the greatest challenges in its history. At a time when we tend to bemoan our selfish preoccupations, it is bracing to read David Kennedy''s moving account of our better selves. This is history the way it ought to be.--Alan Wolfe, Boston College, author of One Nation After All"Displaying a literary craft uncommon in survey works, he has woven together narrative, sketches of character, and critical judgment to record and analyze the economic, political, social, and military events of these epic years.... This account of the crucial struggles and events of the Depression and war years will lend perspective like few others."--Library Journal"David Kennedy is one of America''s most distinguished historians, and Freedom from Fear is a remarkable achievement: deeply researched, insightful, and beautifully written. Fast-paced, it presents vivid portraits of major actors such as Roosevelt, Churchill, and Hitler, as well as of the hopes and fears of millions of lesser-known people caught up in the tumultuous years of the Great Depression and of World War II."--James T. Patterson, BancroftPrize-winning author of Grand Expectations"This is an enormous book, heavy to carry and light and very agreeable to read.... Kennedy holds firmly the attention of the reader, conveying a sense of both serious care and competence, all in good, unassuming English.... The book...has my strong approval. As it will have, I cannot doubt, that of the many readers it deserves."--John Kenneth Galbraith, The Washington Monthly"David Kennedy''s panoramic history of America and the world between 1929 and 1945 is a superb reconstruction of the era that formed our times. Simply put, it is a brilliant narrative and analysis. Anyone who wants to understand our century needs to read Kennedy''s book."--Robert Dallek, Boston University, author of Flawed Giant: Lyndon Johnson and his Times, 1961-1973"It''s hard to think of a more interesting time in American history than the years of the Great Depression and the Second World War--or an historian better able to bring it to life than David Kennedy."--Evan Thomas, author of The Very Best and co-author of The Wise Men:Five Friends and the World They Made"In Freedom from Fear, David Kennedy combines the synthetic talents of a brilliant historian with the literary gifts of a great storyteller. The result is engrossing history, with all the complex characters and suspense of high drama put impressively to the task of demonstrating how a decade and a half of Great Depression and World War have shaped the rest of our century."--Lizabeth Cohen, Harvard University"Kennedy combines the best aspects of narrative and history. His wonderful single-volume history of the era is comprehensive and well researched, and scholars will find much that is new and informative.... It is a smoothly flowing and easily digestible account of great events, and well-informed lay readers will have little difficulty in following and appreciating this saga.... This is a work replete with revealing subtexts, and Roosevelt''s relations andstruggles with African American leaders are especially fascinating. It is a worthy addition to an outstanding series and an essential component to a U.S. history collection for both public and college libraries."--Booklist"David Kennedy''s Freedom from Fear is a masterful work of history covering the American people and their government through the eventful years 1929-1945, it rests on an extraordinary command of the historical literature about that period. Kennedy''s sprightly and lucid prose adds force to his careful judgements, all of them informed, some of them controversial. The book will appeal to all generations of Americans, perhaps especially to those whoremember the Great Depression and World War II, but also to their children and grandchildren. For all Americans still live with the persisting influence of those experiences."--John Morton Blum, Sterling Professor of History Emeritus, Yale University"Rarely does a work of historical synthesis combine such trenchant analysis and elegant writing as does Kennedy''s spectacular contribution to the Oxford History of the United States. Kennedy uses a wide canvas to depict all aspects of the American political, social and economic experience from 1929 to 1945. He also provides a stunningly original reinterpretation of the competing forces and interests that combined to shape the New Deal under FDR''s direction.The book''s final 400 pages admirably demonstrate exactly how the U.S. emerged victorious in WWII.... Because of its scope, its insight and its purring narrative engine, Kennedy''s book will stand for years to come as the definitive history of the most important decades of the American Century."--Publishers Weekly"A major achievement in objective historical writing that should be a legacy to generations of students seeking authoritative reference material on the period."--Kirkus Reviews"This is modern America''s story--modern America''s most thrilling, most irresistible, and most significant story--and in this massive volume, David M. Kennedy makes it his story in a way that no one has before. Freedom From Fear, the fourth installment of the new Oxford History of the United States to appear, is as much a triumph as its predecessors, providing every indication that the series, once completed, will stand as the most comprehensive andmost compelling narrative history of the nation."--David M. Shribman, Boston Globe"A brilliant narrative history of broad scope and complexity."--BookPage"Kennedy''s grasp of deep-rooted social problems and his enlightening, analytical style are very much in evidence.... [he] brilliantly explores the conflicting nuances of [Roosevelt''s] character and program.... Kennedy has achieved a judicious balance in his treatment of the Depression and the military operations and diplomatic maneuvers of World War II. His narrative style is in the grand tradition of American historical writing, an unfaltering display ofclarity and detail."--Ed Voves, Philadephia Inquirer"By linking the Depression and World War II...David Kennedy has undertaken an original approach to modern history.... [he] provides a grand historical synthesis in Freedom From Fear.... this is the kind of book prizes are made for."--Herbert Mitgang, Chicago Tribune"A brilliant achievement."--Philip Seib, Dallas Morning News"A sophisticated and complete one-volume history of a traumatic period such as the Great Depression or World War II.... Kennedy gives a seamless account of the war."--Mark Gamin, Cleveland Plain Dealer"Kennedy has performed an amazing feat in fitting so many varied themes into a single book.... The story is replete with cameo histories of the leading figures of the era.... [He] has done a superb job not only in retelling the main outlines of the story but in giving readres a sense of the breathless onrush of events that closed this short era."--Richard A. Nenneman, The Christian Science Monitor"Splendid.... It is a worthy addition to the multi-volume ''Oxford History of the
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist,
Library Journal, March 1999
Kirkus Reviews, April 1999
Publishers Weekly, April 1999
Chicago Tribune, May 1999
New York Times Book Review, May 1999
Choice, October 1999
Washington Post, December 1999
Los Angeles Times, April 2000
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The same generation of Americans who battled the Depression eventually had to shoulder arms in another conflict that forever changed their country's relationship to the rest of the world.
Long Description
Between 1929 and 1945, two great travails were visited upon the American people: the Great Depression and World War II. Freedom from Fear tells the story of how Americans endured, and eventually prevailed, in the face of those unprecedented calamities. The Depression was both a disaster and an opportunity. As David Kennedy vividly demonstrates, the economic crisis of the 1930s was far more than a simple reaction to the alleged excesses of the 1920s. For more than a century before 1929, America's unbridled industrial revolution had gyrated through repeated boom and bust cycles, wastefullly consuming capital and inflicting untold misery on city and countryside alike. Nor was the fabled prosperity of the 1920s as uniformly shared ag legend portrays. Countless Americans, especially if they were farmers, African Americans, or recent immigrants, eked out thread bare lives on the margins of national life. For them the Depression was but another of the ordeals of fear and insecurity with which they were sadly familiar. Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal wrung from the trauma of the 1930s a lasting legacy of economic and social reform, in cluding the Social Security Act, new banking and financial laws, regulatory legistlation, and new opportunities for organized labour. Taken together, those reforms gave a measure of security to millons of Americans who had never had much of it, and with a fresh sense of having a stake in their country. Freedom from Fear tells the story of the New Deal's achievments, without slighting its shortcomings, contraditions and failures. It is a story rinch in drama and peopled with unforgettable personalities, including the incandescent but enigmatic figure of Roosevelt himself. Even as the New Deal was coping with the Depression, a still more fearsome menace was developing abroad--Hitler's thirst for war in Europe, coupled with the imperial ambitions of Japan in Asia. The same generation of Americans who battled the Depression evenutally had to shoulder the arms in another conflict that wreaked world wide destruction, ushered in the nuclear age and forever changed their own way of life and their country's relationship to the rest of the world. Freedom from Fear explains how the nation agonized over its role in World War II, how it fought the war, why the United States won, and why the consequences of victory were sometimes sweet, sometimes ironic. In a compelling narrative, Kenney analyses the determinants of American strategy, the painful choices faced by commanders and statesmen, and the agonies inflicted on the millions of ordinary Americans who were compelled to swallow their fears and face battle as best they could. Freedom from Fear is a comprehensive and colourful account of the most convulsive period in American history, excepting only the Civil War - a period that formed the crucible in which modern America was formed.
Main Description
Between 1929 and 1945, two great travails were visited upon the American people: the Great Depression and World War II. Freedom From Fear tells the story of how Americans endured, and eventually prevailed, in the face of those unprecedented calamities. The Depression was both a disaster and an opportunity. As David Kennedy vividly demonstrates, the economic crisis of the 1930s was far more than a simple reaction to the alleged excesses of the 1920s. For more than a century before 1929, America's unbridled industrial revolution had gyrated through repeated boom and bust cycles, wastefully consuming capital and inflicting untold misery on city and countryside alike. Nor was the fabled prosperity of the 1920s as uniformly shared as legend portrays. Countless Americans, especially if they were farmers, African Americans, or recent immigrants, eked out thread bare lives on the margins of national life. For them, the Depression was but another of the ordeals of fear and insecurity with which they were sadly familiar. Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal wrung from the trauma of the 1930s a lasting legacy of economic and social reform, including the Social Security Act, new banking and financial laws, regulatory legislation, and new opportunities for organized labor. Taken together, those reforms gave a measure of security to millions of Americans who had never had much of it, and with it a fresh sense of having a stake in their country. Freedom From Fear tells the story of the New Deal's achievements, without slighting its shortcomings, contradictions, and failures. It is a story rich in drama and peopled with unforgettable personalities, including the incandescent but enigmatic figure of Roosevelt himself. Even as the New Deal was coping with the Depression, a still more fearsome menace was developing abroad--Hitler's thirst for war in Europe, coupled with the imperial ambitions of Japan in Asia. The same generation of Americans who battled the Depression eventually had to shoulder arms in another conflict that wreaked world wide destruction, ushered in the nuclear age, and forever changed their own way of life and their country's relationship to the rest of the world. Freedom From Fear explains how the nation agonized over its role in World War II, how it fought the war, why the United States won, and why the consequences of victory were sometimes sweet, sometimes ironic. In a compelling narrative, Kennedy analyzes the determinants of American strategy, the painful choices faced by commanders and statesmen, and the agonies inflicted on the millions of ordinary Americans who were compelled to swallow their fears and face battle as best they could. Freedom From Fear is a comprehensive and colorful account of the most convulsive period in American history, excepting only the Civil War--a period that formed the crucible in which modern America was formed. The Oxford History of the United States The Atlantic Monthly has praised The Oxford History of the United States as "the most distinguished series in American historical scholarship," a series that "synthesizes a generation's worth of historical inquiry and knowledge into one literally state-of-the-art book. Who touches these books touches a profession." Conceived under the general editorship of one of the leading American historians of our time, C. Vann Woodward, The Oxford History of the United States blends social, political, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military history into coherent and vividly written narrative. Previous volumes are Robert Middlekauff's The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution; James M. McPherson's Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (which won a Pulitzer Prize and was a New York Times Best Seller); and James T. Patterson's Grand Expectations: The United States 1945-1974 (which won a Bancroft Prize).
Main Description
Between 1929 and 1945, two great travails were visited upon the American people: the Great Depression and World War II. Freedom From Fear tells the story of how Americans endured, and eventually prevailed, in the face of those unprecedented calamities. The Depression was both a disaster and an opportunity. As David Kennedy vividly demonstrates, the economic crisis of the 1930s was far more than a simple reaction to the alleged excesses of the 1920s. For more than a century before 1929, America's unbridled industrial revolution had gyratedthrough repeated boom and bust cycles, wastefully consuming capital and inflicting untold misery on city and countryside alike. Nor was the fabled prosperity of the 1920s as uniformly shared as legend portrays. Countless Americans, especially if they were farmers, African Americans, or recentimmigrants, eked out thread bare lives on the margins of national life. For them, the Depression was but another of the ordeals of fear and insecurity with which they were sadly familiar. Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal wrung from the trauma of the 1930s a lasting legacy of economic and social reform, including the Social Security Act, new banking and financial laws, regulatory legislation, and new opportunities for organized labor. Taken together, those reforms gave a measure ofsecurity to millions of Americans who had never had much of it, and with it a fresh sense of having a stake in their country. Freedom From Fear tells the story of the New Deal's achievements, without slighting its shortcomings, contradictions, and failures. It is a story rich in drama and peopled with unforgettable personalities, including the incandescent but enigmatic figure of Roosevelt himself. Even as the New Deal was coping with the Depression, a still more fearsome menace was developing abroad--Hitler's thirst for war in Europe, coupled with the imperial ambitions of Japan in Asia. The same generation of Americans who battled the Depression eventually had to shoulder arms inanother conflict that wreaked world wide destruction, ushered in the nuclear age, and forever changed their own way of life and their country's relationship to the rest of the world. Freedom From Fear explains how the nation agonized over its role in World War II, how it fought the war, why theUnited States won, and why the consequences of victory were sometimes sweet, sometimes ironic. In a compelling narrative, Kennedy analyzes the determinants of American strategy, the painful choices faced by commanders and statesmen, and the agonies inflicted on the millions of ordinary Americans whowere compelled to swallow their fears and face battle as best they could. Freedom From Fear is a comprehensive and colorful account of the most convulsive period in American history, excepting only the Civil War--a period that formed the crucible in which modern America was formed. The Oxford History of the United States The Atlantic Monthly has praised The Oxford History of the United States as "the most distinguished series in American historical scholarship," a series that "synthesizes a generation's worth of historical inquiry and knowledge into one literally state-of-the-art book. Who touches these bookstouches a profession." Conceived under the general editorship of one of the leading American historians of our time, C. Vann Woodward, The Oxford History of the United States blends social, political, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military history into coherent and vividly written narrative. Previous volumesare Robert Middlekauff's The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution; James M. McPherson's Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (which won a Pulitzer Prize and was a New York Times Best Seller); and James T. Patterson's Grand Expectations: The United States 1945-1974 (which won a BancroftPrize).
Main Description
Between 1929 and 1945, two great travails were visited upon the American people: the Great Depression and World War II.Freedom From Feartells the story of how Americans endured, and eventually prevailed, in the face of those unprecedented calamities. The Depression was both a disaster and an opportunity. As David Kennedy vividly demonstrates, the economic crisis of the 1930s was far more than a simple reaction to the alleged excesses of the 1920s. For more than a century before 1929, America's unbridled industrial revolution had gyrated through repeated boom and bust cycles, wastefully consuming capital and inflicting untold misery on city and countryside alike. Nor was the fabled prosperity of the 1920s as uniformly shared as legend portrays. Countless Americans, especially if they were farmers, African Americans, or recent immigrants, eked out thread bare lives on the margins of national life. For them, the Depression was but another of the ordeals of fear and insecurity with which they were sadly familiar. Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal wrung from the trauma of the 1930s a lasting legacy of economic and social reform, including the Social Security Act, new banking and financial laws, regulatory legislation, and new opportunities for organized labor. Taken together, those reforms gave a measure of security to millions of Americans who had never had much of it, and with it a fresh sense of having a stake in their country. Freedom From Feartells the story of the New Deal's achievements, without slighting its shortcomings, contradictions, and failures. It is a story rich in drama and peopled with unforgettable personalities, including the incandescent but enigmatic figure of Roosevelt himself. Even as the New Deal was coping with the Depression, a still more fearsome menace was developing abroad--Hitler's thirst for war in Europe, coupled with the imperial ambitions of Japan in Asia. The same generation of Americans who battled the Depression eventually had to shoulder arms in another conflict that wreaked world wide destruction, ushered in the nuclear age, and forever changed their own way of life and their country's relationship to the rest of the world.Freedom From Fearexplains how the nation agonized over its role in World War II, how it fought the war, why the United States won, and why the consequences of victory were sometimes sweet, sometimes ironic. In a compelling narrative, Kennedy analyzes the determinants of American strategy, the painful choices faced by commanders and statesmen, and the agonies inflicted on the millions of ordinary Americans who were compelled to swallow their fears and face battle as best they could. Freedom From Fearis a comprehensive and colorful account of the most convulsive period in American history, excepting only the Civil War--a period that formed the crucible in which modern America was formed. The Oxford History of the United States The Atlantic Monthlyhas praised The Oxford History of the United States as "the most distinguished series in American historical scholarship," a series that "synthesizes a generation's worth of historical inquiry and knowledge into one literally state-of-the-art book. Who touches these books touches a profession." Conceived under the general editorship of one of the leading American historians of our time, C. Vann Woodward, The Oxford History of the United States blends social, political, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military history into coherent and vividly written narrative. Previous volumes are Robert Middlekauff'sThe Glorious Cause: The American Revolution; James M. McPherson'sBattle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era(which won a Pulitzer Prize and was aNew York TimesBest Seller); and James T. Patterson'sGrand Expectations: The United States 1945-1974(which won a Bancroft Prize).
Main Description
Between 1929 and 1945, two great travails were visited upon the American people: the Great Depression and World War II. This book tells the story of how Americans endured, and eventually prevailed, in the face of those unprecedented calamities. The Depression was both a disaster and an opportunity. As David Kennedy vividly demonstrates, the economic crisis of the 1930s was far more than a simple reaction to the alleged excesses of the 1920s. For more than a century before 1929, America's unbridled industrial revolution had gyrated through repeated boom and bust cycles, wastefully consuming capital and inflicting untold misery on city and countryside alike. Freedom From Fear explores how the nation agonized over its role in World War II, how it fought the war, why the United States won, and why the consequences of victory were sometimes sweet, sometimes ironic. In a compelling narrative, Kennedy analyzes the determinants of American strategy, the painful choices faced by commanders and statesmen, and the agonies inflicted on the millions of ordinary Americans who were compelled to swallow their fears and face battle as best they could. Both comprehensive and colorful, this account of the most convulsive period in American history, excepting only the Civil War, reveals a period that formed the crucible in which modern America was formed. The Oxford History of the United States The Atlantic Monthlyhas praised The Oxford History of the United States as "the most distinguished series in American historical scholarship," a series that "synthesizes a generation's worth of historical inquiry and knowledge into one literally state-of-the-art book. Who touches these books touches a profession." Conceived under the general editorship of one of the leading American historians of our time, C. Vann Woodward, The Oxford History of the United States blends social, political, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military history into coherent and vividly written narrative. Previous volumes are Robert Middlekauff'sThe Glorious Cause: The American Revolution; James M. McPherson'sBattle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era(which won a Pulitzer Prize and was aNew York TimesBest Seller); and James T. Patterson'sGrand Expectations: The United States 1945-1974(which won a Bancroft Prize).
Main Description
Between 1929 and 1945, two great travails were visited upon the American people: the Great Depression and World War II. This book tells the story of how Americans endured, and eventually prevailed, in the face of those unprecedented calamities. The Depression was both a disaster and an opportunity. As David Kennedy vividly demonstrates, the economic crisis of the 1930s was far more than a simple reaction to the alleged excesses of the 1920s. For more than a century before 1929, America's unbridled industrial revolution had gyrated through repeated boom and bust cycles, wastefully consuming capital and inflicting untold misery on city and countryside alike. Freedom From Fearexplores how the nation agonized over its role in World War II, how it fought the war, why the United States won, and why the consequences of victory were sometimes sweet, sometimes ironic. In a compelling narrative, Kennedy analyzes the determinants of American strategy, the painful choices faced by commanders and statesmen, and the agonies inflicted on the millions of ordinary Americans who were compelled to swallow their fears and face battle as best they could. Both comprehensive and colorful, this account of the most convulsive period in American history, excepting only the Civil War, reveals a period that formed the crucible in which modern America was formed. The Oxford History of the United States The Atlantic Monthlyhas praised The Oxford History of the United States as "the most distinguished series in American historical scholarship," a series that "synthesizes a generation's worth of historical inquiry and knowledge into one literally state-of-the-art book. Who touches these books touches a profession." Conceived under the general editorship of one of the leading American historians of our time, C. Vann Woodward, The Oxford History of the United States blends social, political, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military history into coherent and vividly written narrative. Previous volumes are Robert Middlekauff'sThe Glorious Cause: The American Revolution; James M. McPherson'sBattle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era(which won a Pulitzer Prize and was aNew York TimesBest Seller); and James T. Patterson'sGrand Expectations: The United States 1945-1974(which won a Bancroft Prize).
Table of Contents
Mapsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Editor's Introductionp. xiii
Abbreviated Titles Used in Citationsp. xvii
Prologue: November 11, 1918p. 1
The American People on the Eve of the Great Depressionp. 10
Panicp. 43
The Ordeal of Herbert Hooverp. 70
Interregnump. 104
The Hundred Daysp. 131
The Ordeal of the American Peoplep. 160
Chasing the Phantom of Recoveryp. 190
The Rumble of Discontentp. 218
A Season for Reformp. 249
Strike!p. 288
The Ordeal of Franklin Rooseveltp. 323
What the New Deal Didp. 363
The Gathering Stormp. 381
The Agony of Neutralityp. 426
To the Brinkp. 465
War in the Pacificp. 516
Unready Ally, Uneasy Alliancep. 565
The War of Machinesp. 615
The Struggle for a Second Frontp. 669
The Battle for Northwest Europep. 709
The Cauldron of the Home Frontp. 746
Endgamep. 798
Epilogue: The World the War Madep. 852
Bibliographical Essayp. 859
Indexp. 877
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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