Catalogue


People of the Wachusett [electronic resource] : greater New England in history and memory, 1630-1860 /
David Jaffee.
imprint
Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, c1999.
description
xiii, 306 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0801436109
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, c1999.
isbn
0801436109
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
6689887
 
Electronic text and image data. Ann Arbor, Mich. : University of Michigan, Scholarly Publishing Office, 2002. Includes both TIFF files and keyword searchable text. ([ACLS Humanities E-Book]) Mode of access: Intranet. This volume is made possible by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.
Includes bibliographical references (p. 291-295) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
David Jaffee is Associate Professor of History, City College of the City University of New York.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-12-01:
Jaffee traces serial town-planting in central Massachusetts and up the Connecticut and Merrimac rivers to the southern shores of Nova Scotia from the 1640s to about 1800. The process began with the Nipmuck Indians in the Wachusett country (now Worcester County) yielding lands to settlers in return for trade relationships. Proprietary townships were replicated, constructing a kinship network among inhabitants of different towns. The author follows the lives of many town founders and weaves comment on material and literary culture into their experiences. The interdependence/rivalry between Native Americans and white settlers form an important dimension of this process; the outcome of the Indian wars stimulated outward migration. Over time, commerce became the mainspring of many towns. Jaffee shows the significance of the collected memory of family, household, and village in shaping New England identity. This work contributes to understanding local history in the larger context of regional society and culture. An epilogue evaluates centennial celebrations of the towns at mid-19th century, noting the quality of the historical memory and the appearance of critical assessment of the past. Recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above. H. M. Ward; University of Richmond
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An artful blend of social and cultural history, People of the Wachusett constitutes a significant study of town formation in New England."-Louis Leonard Tucker, Massachusetts Historical Society
"Contributing to two important trends in recent scholarship-the understanding that the early British colonies were a multiracial society and the analysis of the history of memory-David Jaffee puts a detailed study of east-central Massachusetts into a larger portrait of cultural patterns of Euroamerican settlement between the mid-seventeenth and mid-nineteenth centuries."-Michael Lienesch, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, William and Mary Quarterly. July, 2000.
"Jaffee's book has the qualities of a synthesis that benefits from the previous mining of social historians. The book is enjoyable to read."-Bruce C. Daniels, University of Winnipeg. American Historical Review. October, 2000.
"Jaffee shows the significance of the collected memory of family, household, and village in shaping New England identity. This work contributes to understanding local history in the larger context of regional society and culture."-Choice
"People of the Wachusett is an ambitious book. . . The book provides a social history of town creation and development and briefer forays into cultural identity as explored by residents."-Carla Gardina Pestana, Ohio State University. The Journal of American History, March 2001
"This is an important book whose central conception of serial town settlement as the engine of cultural production in greater New England makes a valuable contribution to New England studies."-Joanne Pope Melish, Univ. of Kentucky. Journal of the Early Republic, Vol. 20, No. 2.
"Through impressive research in town records, material culture, and printed materials, Jaffee chronicles the development of regional identity in the early Washusett. . . There is much that historians of American religion will find worthwhile about this book."-John Fea, Valparaiso University. Religious Studies Review, Vol. 27, No. 3, July 2001
"With a rare combination of cultural insight and a gift for sweeping narrative, David Jaffee offers a new vision of early New England society and culture. People of the Wachusett shifts the familiar ground of colonial Massachusetts in provocative ways: Jaffee locates the business of colonization inland, and penetrates with clarity and depth the exchanges between planters and native peoples as communities and material landscapes changed in the eighteenth century. And through detailed discussions of Chester in Nova Scotia and Walpole, New Hampshire, he helps us see the divergent legacies of social order that derived from New England's ongoing tradition of colonial plantation and cultural diaspora in the early nineteenth century. A major accomplishment."-Robert Blair St. George, Associate Professor and Graduate Chair, Department of Folklore and Folklife, University of Pennsylvania
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Nashaway became Lancaster, Wachusett became Princeton, and all of Nipmuck County became the county of Worcester. Town by town, New England grew-Watertown, Sudbury, Turkey Hills, Fitchburg, Westminster, Walpole-and with each new community the myth of America flourished. In People of the Wachusett the history of the New England town becomes the cultural history of America's first frontier. Integral to this history are the firsthand narratives of town founders and citizens, English, French, and Native American, whose accounts of trading and warring, relocating and putting down roots proved essential to the building of these communities. Town plans, local records, broadside ballads, vernacular house forms and furniture, festivals-all come into play in this innovative book, giving a rich picture of early Americans creating towns and crafting historical memory. Beginning with the Wachusett, in northern Worcester County, Massachusetts, David Jaffee traces the founding of towns through inland New England and Nova Scotia, from the mid-seventeenth century through the Revolutionary Era. His history of New England's settlement is one in which the replication of towns across the landscape is inextricable from the creation of a regional and national culture, with stories about colonization giving shape and meaning to New England life.
Unpaid Annotation
In People of the Wachusett the history of the New England town becomes the cultural history of America's first frontier. Integral to this history are the firsthand narratives of town founders and citizens, English, French, and Native American, whose accounts of trading and warring, relocating and putting down roots proved essential to the building of these communities. Town plans, local records, broadside ballads, vernacular house forms and furniture, festivals -- all come into play in this innovative book, giving a rich picture of early Americans creating towns and crafting historical memory.Beginning with the Wachusett, in northern Worcester County, Massachusetts, David Jaffee traces the founding of towns through inland New England and Nova Scotia, from the mid-seventeenth century through the Revolutionary Era. His history of New England's settlement is one in which the replication of towns across the landscape is inextricable from the creation of a regional and national culture, with stories about colonization giving shape and meaning to New England life.
Table of Contents
Illustrations and Tablesp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: New England Beginsp. 1
Town Settlement in the Seventeenth Centuryp. 23
Indians, English, and Missionaries: The Plantation of Nashawayp. 25
"Indian-Fighters" and Town Founders: The Resettlement of the Wachusett, 1675-1725p. 73
Town Settlement in the Eighteenth Centuryp. 101
Lancaster and Its Offspring: Serial Town Formation Enters the New Centuryp. 103
Narragansett No. 2: Reproducing Families and Farmsp. 127
The Creation of Greater New Englandp. 163
New England Moves North: The South Shore of Nova Scotiap. 165
Town Founding and the Village Enlightenment: Walpole, New Hampshirep. 200
Epilogue: The Myth of Town Settlementp. 239
Notesp. 251
Bibliographical Essayp. 291
Indexp. 296
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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