Catalogue


Samuel Johnson : the struggle /
Jeffrey Meyers.
imprint
New York : Basic Books, c2008.
description
xiv, 528 p. : ill.
ISBN
9780465045716
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Basic Books, c2008.
isbn
9780465045716
catalogue key
6681076
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-10-01:
A generation has passed since the publication of the last full-dress biographies of Johnson: Walter Jackson Bate's Samuel Johnson appeared in 1977, and James Clifford's Dictionary Johnson: Samuel Johnson's Middle Years, the second of three planned volumes, in 1979. Scholarly works, e.g., Robert DeMaria's The Life of Samuel Johnson: A Critical Biography (1993), have appeared since, but not a complete life useful for less experienced readers. The year 2009, Johnson's 300th birthday, has brought two new biographies--Peter Martin's Samuel Johnson (CH, Jul'09, 46-6058) and this one (a third, David Nokes's Samuel Johnson: A Life, is expected). Meyers's subtitle identifies his central concern; his Johnson is a hero fighting mental and physical torments. The book reads well, though it is marred by dozens of small errors that will frustrate specialists. In addition, Meyers (independent scholar) accepts arguments first advanced in 1949 that Johnson and his close friend Hester Thrale engaged in sadomasochistic sex play, but his handling of evidence is sloppy, and the question remains unsettled. Though specialists will find little here that has not been published before, those less familiar with Johnson will enjoy this approachable book. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower- and upper-division undergraduates; general readers. J. T. Lynch Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark
Appeared in Library Journal on 2008-11-15:
It's impossible to measure Samuel Johnson's influence on the English language. He was proficient in multiple genres-particularly poetry, essays, and criticism-and his dictionary stood as the standard until the first version of the Oxford English Dictionary (approximately 150 years later). Known for his intellect and ideals, Johnson led a life complicated by physical deformities and a tendency toward social improprieties. While he was generally well intentioned and appreciated friends in politics, the arts, the literary world, and religious circles, Johnson could also be prone to fits of anger and bouts of crying. Meyers, the author of over 20 books (e.g., Modigliani: A Life), offers several new interpretations of Johnson's life and works, most notably his marriage and sexual life, his hostility to Jonathan Swift, and his influence on five major writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Meyers's use of details and language is lively, and his interpretation well reasoned. Recommended for all academic libraries and for public libraries as interest warrants.-Pam Kingsbury, Univ. of North Alabama, Florence (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2008-09-22:
Dr. Johnson was one of the most keenly observed figures in his time, and with the second book of the season anticipating the 2009 tercentenary of his birth (after Peter Martin's, published by Harvard in September), he remains a massive, grotesque genius who continues to haunt us. Popularly written by prolific biographer and literary critic Meyers (Hemingway), this departs from a strict chronology to narrate significant events and their meaning for Johnson. A central concern involves one of Johnson's darkest secrets, which Meyers says other biographers have evaded: his masochistic sexuality at the hands of his confidante Mrs. Hester Thrale. The biography also speculates on other aspects of Johnson's sex life, both during his marriage to a much older woman and after her death. But Meyers's book is balanced and accomplishes much else. In discussing the great Dictionary that made Johnson famous (and led to a royal pension to ease his hardscrabble life), the Rambler and Idlers essays, Johnson's edition of Shakespeare and Lives of the Poets, Meyers goes to the heart of a tortured, contradictory and pessimistic sage whose self-lacerating personality, says Meyers, would come to influence modernists as disparate as Woolf, Beckett and Nabokov. 19 illus. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
Financial Times "Entertaining, perceptive and well-written."The New Yorker "Meyers, to his credit, tries to look frankly at the evidence about [Johnson's and Hester Thrale's] peculiar erotic relation. The result is to make Johnson even more of a personality, and less of a pedant; he emerges as a man of passion and pain, given and taken, a professor of desire."Boston Globe "[An] informed, sprightly read…[that] increase[s] our knowledge by presenting a more sexual and tormented Johnson than we've known."Los Angeles Times "This is one of those rare works that does equal justice to the standards of the academy and to an intelligent reader's desire to be both edified and entertainingly engaged…. [An] exemplary biography…[that] does full justice to the ever-remarkable Samuel Johnson."Washington Post "If you know Johnson's work and want to see it in context, turn first to Meyers."Dallas Morning News "Accessible... [and] at home amid the chaos of Johnson's daily life."St. Louis Post-Dispatch "[A] vivid account of a man who fit the clichÉ of being larger than life."Providence Journal "With Meyers [as our guide]… we're above the hubbub and we see more comprehensively and objectively…. In the end, Meyers captures Johnson's 'powerful intellect,' but his torment, too."
Financial Times "Entertaining, perceptive and well-written." The New Yorker "Meyers, to his credit, tries to look frankly at the evidence about [Johnson's and Hester Thrale's] peculiar erotic relation. The result is to make Johnson even more of a personality, and less of a pedant; he emerges as a man of passion and pain, given and taken, a professor of desire." Boston Globe "[An] informed, sprightly read…[that] increase[s] our knowledge by presenting a more sexual and tormented Johnson than we've known." Los Angeles Times "This is one of those rare works that does equal justice to the standards of the academy and to an intelligent reader's desire to be both edified and entertainingly engaged…. [An] exemplary biography…[that] does full justice to the ever-remarkable Samuel Johnson." Washington Post "If you know Johnson's work and want to see it in context, turn first to Meyers." Dallas Morning News "Accessible... [and] at home amid the chaos of Johnson's daily life." St. Louis Post-Dispatch "[A] vivid account of a man who fit the cliché of being larger than life." Providence Journal "With Meyers [as our guide]… we're above the hubbub and we see more comprehensively and objectively…. In the end, Meyers captures Johnson's 'powerful intellect,' but his torment, too." Choice "[T]hose less familiar with Johnson will enjoy this approachable book." Newsweek "Read…Jeffrey Meyers for the splendid manner in which he places Johnson in the context of 18th-century England not to mention for the latest dose of good old 18th-century pathology." The Weekly Standard "Meyers has written an engaging book. Thoroughly in command of his sources, he writes with brisk efficiency and has genuinely new things to say about the life and work."
Financial Times "Entertaining, perceptive and well-written."The New Yorker "Meyers, to his credit, tries to look frankly at the evidence about [Johnson's and Hester Thrale's] peculiar erotic relation. The result is to make Johnson even more of a personality, and less of a pedant; he emerges as a man of passion and pain, given and taken, a professor of desire."Boston Globe "[An] informed, sprightly read…[that] increase[s] our knowledge by presenting a more sexual and tormented Johnson than we've known."Los Angeles Times "This is one of those rare works that does equal justice to the standards of the academy and to an intelligent reader's desire to be both edified and entertainingly engaged…. [An] exemplary biography…[that] does full justice to the ever-remarkable Samuel Johnson."Washington Post "If you know Johnson's work and want to see it in context, turn first to Meyers."Dallas Morning News "Accessible... [and] at home amid the chaos of Johnson's daily life."St. Louis Post-Dispatch "[A] vivid account of a man who fit the clichÉ of being larger than life."Providence Journal "With Meyers [as our guide]… we're above the hubbub and we see more comprehensively and objectively…. In the end, Meyers captures Johnson's 'powerful intellect,' but his torment, too." Choice "[T]hose less familiar with Johnson will enjoy this approachable book." Newsweek "Read…Jeffrey Meyers for the splendid manner in which he places Johnson in the context of 18th-century England not to mention for the latest dose of good old 18th-century pathology." The Weekly Standard "Meyers has written an engaging book. Thoroughly in command of his sources, he writes with brisk efficiency and has genuinely new things to say about the life and work."
Financial Times “Entertaining, perceptive and well-written.” The New Yorker “Meyers, to his credit, tries to look frankly at the evidence about [Johnson’s and Hester Thrale’s] peculiar erotic relation. The result is to make Johnson even more of a personality, and less of a pedant; he emerges as a man of passion and pain, given and taken, a professor of desire.” Boston Globe “[An] informed, sprightly read&[that] increase[s] our knowledge by presenting a more sexual and tormented Johnson than we’ve known.” Los Angeles Times “This is one of those rare works that does equal justice to the standards of the academy and to an intelligent reader’s desire to be both edified and entertainingly engaged&. [An] exemplary biography&[that] does full justice to the ever-remarkable Samuel Johnson.” Washington Post “If you know Johnson’s work and want to see it in context, turn first to Meyers.” Dallas Morning News “Accessible... [and] at home amid the chaos of Johnson’s daily life.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch “[A] vivid account of a man who fit the clich of being larger than life.” Providence Journal “With Meyers [as our guide]& we’re above the hubbub and we see more comprehensively and objectively&. In the end, Meyers captures Johnson’s ‘powerful intellect,’ but his torment, too.” Choice “[T]hose less familiar with Johnson will enjoy this approachable book.” Newsweek “Read&Jeffrey Meyers for the splendid manner in which he places Johnson in the context of 18th-century England – not to mention for the latest dose of good old 18th-century pathology.” The Weekly Standard “Meyers has written an engaging book. Thoroughly in command of his sources, he writes with brisk efficiency and has genuinely new things to say about the life and work.”
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Publishers Weekly, September 2008
Booklist, November 2008
Boston Globe, November 2008
Library Journal, November 2008
Washington Post, December 2008
New York Times Book Review, January 2009
Globe & Mail, February 2009
Choice, October 2009
New York Times Full Text Review, October 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Ford Madox Ford declared Samuel Johnson "the most tragic of all our major literary figures." Blessed with a formidable intellect and a burning passion for ideas, Johnson also struggled throughout his life with mental instability and numerous physical defects. One of the most illustrious figures of the English literary tradition, Johnson made his fame as poet, essayist, critic, dictionary-maker, conversationalist, and all-around larger-than-life personality. His success was all the greater for the adversity he had to overcome in achieving it. Drawing on a lifetime of study of Johnson and his era, as well as a wide array of new archival materials, noted biographer Jeffrey Meyers tells the extraordinary story of one of the great geniuses of English letters. Johnson emerges in his portrait as a mass of contradictions: lazy and energetic, aggressive and tender, melancholy and witty, comforted yet tormented by religion. He was physically repulsive and slovenly in dress and habits, but his social ideas were progressive and humane--he strongly opposed slavery and the imperial exploitation of indigenous peoples. He gave generously to the poor and homeless, rescued prostitutes, and defended criminals who'd been condemned to hang. But these charitable acts could not dispel the darkness that clouded his world: overwhelming guilt and fear of eternal damnation. A masterful portrait of a brilliant and tormented figure, this book reintroduces a new generation of readers to the heroic Dr. Johnson.
Main Description
Ford Madox Ford declared Samuel Johnson "the most tragic of all our major literary figures." Blessed with a formidable intellect and a burning passion for ideas, Johnson also struggled throughout his life with mental instability and numerous physical defects. One of the most illustrious figures of the English literary tradition, Johnson made his fame as poet, essayist, critic, dictionary-maker, conversationalist, and all-around larger-than-life personality. His success was all the greater for the adversity he had to overcome in achieving it.Drawing on a lifetime of study of Johnson and his era, as well as a wide array of new archival materials, noted biographer Jeffrey Meyers tells the extraordinary story of one of the great geniuses of English letters. Johnson emerges in his portrait as a mass of contradictions: lazy and energetic, aggressive and tender, melancholy and witty, comforted yet tormented by religion. He was physically repulsive and slovenly in dress and habits, but his social ideas were progressive and humanehe strongly opposed slavery and the imperial exploitation of indigenous peoples. He gave generously to the poor and homeless, rescued prostitutes, and defended criminals who'd been condemned to hang. But these charitable acts could not dispel the darkness that clouded his world: overwhelming guilt and fear of eternal damnation.A masterful portrait of a brilliant and tormented figure, this book reintroduces a new generation of readers to the heroic Dr. Johnson.

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