Catalogue


Scotland as we know it : representations of national identity in literature, film and popular culture /
Richard Zumkhawala-Cook.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2008.
description
ix, 206 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0786440317 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780786440313 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2008.
isbn
0786440317 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780786440313 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Scottish nationality and Tartan culture -- The homely Kailyard nation -- Masculinizing the Kailyard : the Scottish renaissance and the new nation -- The mark of global Scottishness : heritage identity and the Tartan monster -- Heroes, thugs and legends : celluloid Scotland at century's end.
abstract
"Popular representations of Scottish national, ethnic, and cultural identity are in abundance not only in Scotland, but also in the United States, Canada, and throughout the Anglophone settler nations of the world. Scotland, then, in its cultural presence as a "nation without a state," serves as a fitting site for a study of nationality in the modern world"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
6679487
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 195-201) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Spanning more than 100 years of cultural history, this book examines the ways that representations of Scottish identity in Scotland and abroad have influenced and responded to the rapid changes of modernity since 1890. Popular representations of Scottish national, ethnic, and cultural identity are in abundance not only in Scotland, but also in the United States, Canada, and throughout the Anglophone settler nations of the world.The author argues that Scotland's history, traditions, and bloodlines have served as ideological battlegrounds for Scots and non-Scots alike to give voice to fantasies of pre-industrial communities and to the realities of working class life. Linking a range of nationalist renditions of Scottish culture, including poetry, film, folklore studies, clan organizations, and popular fiction, this volume shows the importance of Scotland to our present understanding of class, gender, race, and national identity.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Linking a range of nationalist discourses of Scottish culture, including poetry, film, folklore studies, clan organizations, and popular fiction, this volume shows the importance of Scotland in our contemporary understandings of class, gender, race, and national identity.
Main Description
Spanning more than 100 years of cultural history, this book examines the ways that representations of Scottish identity in Scotland and abroad have influenced and responded to the rapid changes of modernity since 1890. Popular representations of Scottish national, ethnic, and cultural identity are in abundance not only in Scotland, but also in the United States, Canada, and throughout the Anglophone settler nations of the world. The author argues that Scotland's history, traditions, and bloodlines have served as ideological battlegrounds for Scots and non-Scots alike to give voice to fantasies of pre-industrial communities and to the realities of working class life. Linking a range of nationalist renditions of Scottish culture, including poetry, film, folklore studies, clan organizations, and popular fiction, this volume shows the importance of Scotland to our present understanding of class, gender, race, and national identity.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Prefacep. 1
Scottish Nationality and Tartan Culturep. 5
The Homely Kailyard Nationp. 28
Masculinizing the Kailyard: The Scottish Renaissance and the New Nationp. 68
The Mark of Global Scottishness: Heritage Identity and the Tartan Monsterp. 108
Heroes, Thugs and Legends: Celluloid Scotland at Century's Endp. 145
Epiloguep. 175
Chapter Notesp. 183
Bibliographyp. 195
Indexp. 203
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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