Catalogue


Pueblos, Spaniards, and the kingdom of New Mexico /
John L. Kessell.
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2008.
description
xii, 225 p.
ISBN
0806139692 (cloth), 9780806139692 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2008.
isbn
0806139692 (cloth)
9780806139692 (cloth)
contents note
Introduction: Conflict and coexistence -- The Pueblo world -- Spaniards come to stay : founding the colony, 1598-1610 -- A Franciscan city of God on the Rio Grande, 1610s-1640s -- A colony of cousins, 1630s-1660s -- Troublous times, 1660s-1670s -- The Pueblos' holy war, 1680s -- Resettlement, 1690s -- Epilogue: A lifetime later, 1760.
catalogue key
6679421
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 205-213) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-11-01:
After a long, distinguished career as one of the foremost interpreters of the Indian, Spanish, and American Southwest, Kessell (emer., Univ. of New Mexico) focuses his most recent narrative on the interaction between the Spaniards and Pueblos from 1598 to 1800. It is an impressive venture, illustrating the rich insights a lifetime of study can bring to a worthy subject. The Pueblos lived in a dangerous, violent, and changing world before the arrival of the Spaniards, and that environment hardly changed after the outsiders invaded. The Europeans were no strangers to violence, and their rule in New Mexico frequently rested more on physical coercion than on persuasion. Along the way, however, the two cultures and populations became blood brothers, what Kessell calls a colony of "cousins." Yet this was not a utopia; family feuds spilled across cultural borders and profoundly changed community politics. In the case of the Pueblos, kinship ties with the Spaniards made it almost impossible to present a united front against foreign rule. Kessell spends time explaining the Pueblo Revolt of the 1680s, the Spanish return in the 1690s, the fascinating standoff between Catholicism and kachina worship, and many other topics. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. J. A. Lewis Western Carolina University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2009
Choice, November 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
For more than four hundred years in New Mexico, Pueblo Indians and Spaniards have lived “together yet apart.” Now the preeminent historian of that region’s colonial past offers a fresh, balanced look at the origins of a precarious relationship. John L. Kessell has written the first narrative history devoted to the tumultuous seventeenth century in New Mexico. Setting aside stereotypes of a Native American Eden and the Black Legend of Spanish cruelty, he paints an evenhanded picture of a tense but interwoven coexistence. Beginning with the first permanent Spanish settlement among the Pueblos of the Rio Grande in 1598, he proposes a set of relations more complicated than previous accounts envisioned and then reinterprets the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 and the Spanish reconquest in the 1690s. Kessell clearly describes the Pueblo world encountered by Spanish conquistador Juan de O ate and portrays important but lesser-known Indian partisans, all while weaving analysis and interpretation into the flow of life in seventeenth-century New Mexico. Brimming with new insights embedded in an engaging narrative, Kessell’s work presents a clearer picture than ever before of events leading to the Pueblo Revolt. Pueblos, Spaniards, and the Kingdom of New Mexicois the definitive account of a volatile era.
Main Description
For more than four hundred years in New Mexico, Pueblo Indians and Spaniards have lived "together yet apart." Now the preeminent historian of that region's colonial past offers a fresh, balanced look at the origins of a precarious relationship. John L. Kessell has written the first narrative history devoted to the tumultuous seventeenth century in New Mexico. Setting aside stereotypes of a Native American Eden and the Black Legend of Spanish cruelty, he paints an evenhanded picture of a tense but interwoven coexistence. Beginning with the first permanent Spanish settlement among the Pueblos of the Rio Grande in 1598, he proposes a set of relations more complicated than previous accounts envisioned and then reinterprets the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 and the Spanish reconquest in the 1690s. Kessell clearly describes the Pueblo world encountered by Spanish conquistador Juan de Oñate and portrays important but lesser-known Indian partisans, all while weaving analysis and interpretation into the flow of life in seventeenth-century New Mexico. Brimming with new insights embedded in an engaging narrative, Kessell's work presents a clearer picture than ever before of events leading to the Pueblo Revolt. Pueblos, Spaniards, and the Kingdom of New Mexicois the definitive account of a volatile era.
Main Description
A distinguished historian paints an evenhanded picture of uneasy coexistence
Main Description
A distinguished historian paints an evenhanded picture of uneasy coexistence For more than four hundred years in New Mexico, Pueblo Indians and Spaniards have lived "together yet apart." Now the preeminent historian of that region's colonial past offers a fresh, balanced look at the origins of a precarious relationship. John L. Kessell has written the first narrative history devoted to the tumultuous seventeenth century in New Mexico. Setting aside stereotypes of a Native American Eden and the Black Legend of Spanish cruelty, he paints an evenhanded picture of a tense but interwoven coexistence. Beginning with the first permanent Spanish settlement among the Pueblos of the Rio Grande in 1598, he proposes a set of relations more complicated than previous accounts envisioned and then reinterprets the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 and the Spanish reconquest in the 1690s. Kessell clearly describes the Pueblo world encountered by Spanish conquistador Juan de Onate and portrays important but lesser-known Indian partisans, all while weaving analysis and interpretation into the flow of life in seventeenth-century New Mexico. Brimming with new insights embedded in an engaging narrative, Kessell's work presents a clearer picture than ever before of events leading to the Pueblo Revolt. Pueblos, Spaniards, and the Kingdom of New Mexicois the definitive account of a volatile era.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Introduction: Conflict and Coexistencep. 3
The Pueblo Worldp. 7
Spaniards Come to Stay: Founding the Colony, 1598-1610p. 25
A Franciscan City of God on the Rio Grande, 1610s-1640sp. 51
A Colony of Cousins, 1630s-1660sp. 73
Troublous Times, 1660s-1670sp. 97
The Pueblos' Holy War, 1680sp. 119
Resettlement, 1690sp. 149
Epilogue: A Lifetime Later, 1760p. 177
Postscriptp. 183
Notesp. 189
Bibliographyp. 201
Indexp. 209
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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