Catalogue

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The Cuban connection : drug trafficking, smuggling, and gambling in Cuba from the 1920s to the Revolution /
Eduardo Sáenz Rovner ; translated by Russ Davidson.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2008.
description
xii, 247 p.
ISBN
0807831751 (cloth), 9780807831755 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2008.
isbn
0807831751 (cloth)
9780807831755 (cloth)
contents note
U.S. prohibition and smuggling from Cuba -- Drug trafficking and political anarchy during the 1930s -- The Chinese and opium consumption in Cuba -- Corruption and drug trafficking in Cuba during the Second World War and the early postwar years -- Lucky Luciano in Cuba -- The Prío Socarrás government and drug trafficking -- Gambling in Cuba -- The Andean connection -- Contacts in France -- The Batista dictatorship and drug trafficking -- Revolution -- The diplomacy of drug trafficking at the beginning of the Revolution.
language note
Translated from the Spanish.
catalogue key
6679364
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [211]-236) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-12-01:
This meticulously researched and cogently argued work represents a major contribution to Cuban history in the decades between the Gerardo Machado dictatorship in the 1920s and the Fidel Castro revolution of the late 1950s. Saenz (Univ. Nacional de Colombia, Bogota) deftly explores the complicated, often fortuitous connection between narcotic consumption and trafficking in Cuba and international events such as prohibition in the US, WW II, and the transfer of industrial technology around the world. International migrations and diasporas feature significantly in the manufacture and commerce of narcotics, so the location and history of Cuba facilitated reciprocal connections with Europe and Asia as well as the US and certain Latin America countries. This excellent study overturns much conventional wisdom about drug trafficking, smuggling, gambling, and the Mafia, as well as the entire gamut of relations between successive governments in Cuba and the US. As late as the 1950s, "shipments and confiscations [or narcotics] were measured in grams, ounces, pounds, and kilos, not in tons, as has recently been the case" (p. 8). From such modest beginnings, drug trafficking was facilitated by bureaucratic incompetence and rampant corruption. Accessibly written and powerfully insightful. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. F. W. Knight Johns Hopkins University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A unique contribution to the fields of Latin American history, U.S. foreign relations, and narcotics studies. . . . Great credit is due to the author for locating this data and producing such a concise account based on it." - Hispanic American Historical Review
"A unique contribution to the fields of Latin American history, U.S. foreign relations, and narcotics studies. . . . Great credit is due to the author for locating this data and producing such a concise account based on it." -Hispanic American Historical Review
"A valuable addition to that corpus of historical research on Cuba that confronts official myths that it is all too easy to leave unchallenged." _ Latin American Review of Books
"A valuable addition to that corpus of historical research on Cuba that confronts official myths that it is all too easy to leave unchallenged." -- Latin American Review of Books
"A valuable addition to that corpus of historical research on Cuba that confronts official myths that it is all too easy to leave unchallenged." --Latin American Review of Books
"Succeeds at inserting Cuba more fully into the drug literature." -- New Americas
"Succeeds at inserting Cuba more fully into the drug literature." --New Americas
"Succeeds at inserting Cuba more fully into the drug literature." '”New Americas
"This book fills some Cuban niches untouched by North American scholars. . . . [It] brings to light new documentation regarding Cubans, non-Cuban traffickers, and people who used Cuba as a logistical base from the era of prohibition to the Cuban Revolution. . . . There is no doubt that Saenz Rovner gives Cuba the coverage it deserves." - American Historical Review
"This book fills some Cuban niches untouched by North American scholars. . . . [It] brings to light new documentation regarding Cubans, non-Cuban traffickers, and people who used Cuba as a logistical base from the era of prohibition to the Cuban Revolution. . . . There is no doubt that Sáenz Rovner gives Cuba the coverage it deserves." --American Historical Review
"This exhaustively researched text will be of great use to scholars of twentieth-century Cuba, U.S.-Cuban relations, and the global drug trade." -H-Net Reviews
"Valuable for fields such as political science and sociology and interdisciplinary areas such as Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and criminal justice . . . . A worthy read." - New West Indian Guide
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Rovner argues that Cuba's integration into international migration, commerce, and transportation networks combined with political instability and corruption to help lay the foundation for the development of organised crime structures powerful enough to affect Cuba's domestic and foreign politics and its very identity as a nation.
Main Description
A comprehensive history of crime and corruption in Cuba, The Cuban Connection challenges the common view that widespread poverty and geographic proximity to the United States were the prime reasons for soaring rates of drug trafficking, smuggling, gambling, and prostitution in the tumultuous decades preceding the Cuban revolution. Eduardo Saenz Rovner argues that Cuba's historically well-established integration into international migration, commerce, and transportation networks combined with political instability and rampant official corruption to help lay the foundation for the development of organized crime structures powerful enough to affect Cuba's domestic and foreign politics and its very identity as a nation. Saenz traces the routes taken around the world by traffickers and smugglers. After Cuba, the most important player in this story is the United States. The involvement of gangsters and corrupt U.S. officials and businessmen enabled prohibited substances to reach a strong market in the United States, from rum running during Prohibition to increased demand for narcotics during the Cold War. Originally published in Colombia in 2005, this first English-language edition has been revised and updated by the author.
Main Description
A comprehensive history of crime and corruption in Cuba,The Cuban Connectionchallenges the common view that widespread poverty and geographic proximity to the United States were the prime reasons for soaring rates of drug trafficking, smuggling, gambling, and prostitution in the tumultuous decades preceding the Cuban revolution. Eduardo Sáenz Rovner argues that Cuba's historically well-established integration into international migration, commerce, and transportation networks combined with political instability and rampant official corruption to help lay the foundation for the development of organized crime structures powerful enough to affect Cuba's domestic and foreign politics and its very identity as a nation.Sáenz traces the routes taken around the world by traffickers and smugglers. After Cuba, the most important player in this story is the United States. The involvement of gangsters and corrupt U.S. officials and businessmen enabled prohibited substances to reach a strong market in the United States, from rum running during Prohibition to increased demand for narcotics during the Cold War. Originally published in Colombia in 2005, this first English-language edition has been revised and updated by the author.
Main Description
A comprehensive history of crime and corruption in Cuba, The Cuban Connection challenges the common view that widespread poverty and geographic proximity to the United States were the prime reasons for soaring rates of drug trafficking, smuggling, gambling, and prostitution in the tumultuous decades preceding the Cuban revolution. Eduardo S enz Rovner argues that Cuba's historically well-established integration into international migration, commerce, and transportation networks combined with political instability and rampant official corruption to help lay the foundation for the development of organized crime structures powerful enough to affect Cuba's domestic and foreign politics and its very identity as a nation. S enz traces the routes taken around the world by traffickers and smugglers. After Cuba, the most important player in this story is the United States. The involvement of gangsters and corrupt U.S. officials and businessmen enabled prohibited substances to reach a strong market in the United States, from rum running during Prohibition to increased demand for narcotics during the Cold War. Originally published in Colombia in 2005, this first English-language edition has been revised and updated by the author.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
U.S. Prohibition and Smuggling from Cubap. 17
Drug Trafficking and Political Anarchy during the 1930sp. 31
The Chinese and Opium Consumption in Cubap. 45
Corruption and Drug Trafficking in Cuba during the Second World War and the Early Postwar Yearsp. 57
Lucky Luciano in Cubap. 65
The Prio Socarras Government and Drug Traffickingp. 75
Gambling in Cubap. 81
The Andean Connectionp. 95
Contacts in Francep. 103
The Batista Dictatorship and Drug Traffickingp. 113
Revolutionp. 123
The Diplomacy of Drug Trafficking at the Beginning of the Revolutionp. 135
Epiloguep. 147
Notesp. 153
Bibliographyp. 211
Indexp. 237
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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