Catalogue


Yeomen, sharecroppers, and socialists : plain folk protest in Texas, 1870-1914 /
Kyle G. Wilkison.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
College Station : Texas A&M University Press, c2008.
description
x, 297 p.
ISBN
1603440658 (cloth : alk. paper), 9781603440653 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
College Station : Texas A&M University Press, c2008.
isbn
1603440658 (cloth : alk. paper)
9781603440653 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction -- From homeplace to no place: the changing Texas economy, 1870-1910 -- Farmers and wealth distribution in Hunt County, Texas, 1870-1910 -- "A legitimate and useful life": family, work, and community -- "The same class of people": cohesion and conflict -- "The land shall not be sold forever": land and God in 1910s Texas -- "Whose planet is this anyway?": land and the politics of dissent -- Conclusion -- Appendix A. Tables for Chapter 2 -- Appendix B. Tables for Chapter 3 -- Appendix C. Methods for Chapter 3 -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
catalogue key
6679220
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-05-01:
Historical surveys highlighting African Americans, Native Americans, women, and industrial laborers are abundantly manifest on library shelves. Yet one group central to an accurate understanding of southern society remains virtually forgotten. The common white folk of the South continue as a seldom seriously considered segment of society, even as depictions of the grandiosity of plantation life have given way to emphasis on the burdens endured by the enslaved. In this welcome appraisal of the US's arguably most forgotten group, Wilkison (Collin College, Texas) challenges the myth of this group's irrelevance. He reveals a dynamic plain folk culture, an assertive people who, though victimized by circumstances beyond their control, nonetheless proved willing to challenge the mechanisms of injustice that inhibited their social and political empowerment. Combining extensive historiographical and quantitative analysis with captivating personal detail, Wilkison's reconsideration of the Texas plain folk is certain to serve as a model for future studies. It is a must for those who seek to understand the complexities of southern sociopolitical development in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Though the mechanics of Wilkison's perspective may challenge novice readers of southern social surveys, his book will serve as an excellent addition to upper-level and graduate courses in New South studies. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Most levels/libraries. S. C. Hyde Southeastern Louisiana University
Reviews
Review Quotes
". . . reveals a dynamic plain folk culture, an assertive people who, though victimized by circumstances beyond their control, nonetheless proved willing to challenge the mechanisms of injustice that inhibited their social and political empowerment. Combining extensive historiographical and quantitative analysis with captivating personal detail, Wilkison''s reconsideration of the Texas plain folk is certain to serve as a model for future studies. It is a must for those who seek to understand the complexities of southern sociopolitical development in the late 19th and early 20th centuries."--Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries
"Only a few books deal with Texas' yeomen farmers or its sharecroppers or its socialists. Dr. Wilkison's book utilizes the older works, analyzes the interaction between the three groups, and breaks new ground in the social, economic, and political history of the state during a crucial era."--George N. Green, professor of history, University of Texas at Arlington, author of The Establishment in Texas Politics: The Primitive Years, 1938--1957
". . . reveals a dynamic plain folk culture, an assertive people who, though victimized by circumstances beyond their control, nonetheless proved willing to challenge the mechanisms of injustice that inhibited their social and political empowerment. Combining extensive historiographical and quantitative analysis with captivating personal detail, Wilkison''s reconsideration of the Texas plain folk is certain to serve as a model for future studies. It is a must for those who seek to understand the complexities of southern sociopolitical development in the late 19th and early 20th centuries."-- Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries
"Wilkison does not mince his words but makes his points clear and precise." "Wilkison''s monograph warrants professional recognition because he explains the choices mde by a distinct minority within the white landless farmer majority"
"The book displays an impressive amount of research and some superb analysis...it will likely affect research on Southwestern radicalism for years to come." -- Nigel Anthony Sellars, Christopher Newport University
"The book displays an impressive amount of research and some superb analysis... Yeomen, Sharecroppers, and Socialists is a fascinating work. . . it will likely affect research on Southwestern radicalism for years to come." -- Nigel Anthony Sellars, Christopher Newport University
"The book displays an impressive amount of research and some superb analysis...Yeomen, Sharecroppers, and Socialists is a fascinating work. . . it will likely affect research on Southwestern radicalism for years to come." -- Nigel Anthony Sellars, Christopher Newport University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
As the nineteenth century ended in Hunt County, Texas, a way of life was dying. The tightly knit, fiercely independent society of the yeomen farmers-"plain folk," as historians have often dubbed them-was being swallowed up by the rising tide of a rapidly changing, cotton-based economy. A social network based on family, religion, and community was falling prey to crippling debt and resulting loss of land ownership. For many of the rural people of Hunt County and similar places, it seemed like the end of the world. In Yeomen, Sharecroppers, and Socialists historian Kyle G. Wilkison analyzes the patterns of plain-folk life and the changes that occurred during the critical four decades spanning the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries. Political protest evolved in the wake of the devastating losses experienced by the poor rural majority, and Wilkison carefully explores the interplay of religion and politics as Greenbackers, Populists, and Socialists vied for the support of the dispossessed tenant farmers and sharecroppers. With its richly drawn contextualization and analysis of the causes and effects of the epochal shifts in plain-folk society, Kyle G. Wilkison's Yeomen, Sharecroppers, and Socialists will reward students and scholars in economic, regional, and agricultural history.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Historian Kyle G. Wilkinson analyses the patterns of plain-folk life and the changes that occurred during the critical four decades spanning the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th centuries.
Main Description
As the nineteenth century ended in Hunt County, Texas, a way of life was dying. The tightly knit, fiercely independent society of the yeomen farmers-”plain folk,” as historians have often dubbed them-was being swallowed up by the rising tide of a rapidly changing, cotton-based economy. A social network based on family, religion, and community was falling prey to crippling debt and resulting loss of land ownership. For many of the rural people of Hunt County and similar places, it seemed like the end of the world. In Yeomen, Sharecroppers, and Socialists historian Kyle G. Wilkison analyzes the patterns of plain-folk life and the changes that occurred during the critical four decades spanning the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries. Political protest evolved in the wake of the devastating losses experienced by the poor rural majority, and Wilkison carefully explores the interplay of religion and politics as Greenbackers, Populists, and Socialists vied for the support of the dispossessed tenant farmers and sharecroppers. With its richly drawn contextualization and analysis of the causes and effects of the epochal shifts in plain-folk society, Kyle G. Wilkison’s Yeomen, Sharecroppers, and Socialists will reward students and scholars in economic, regional, and agricultural history.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
From Homeplace to No Place: The Changing Texas Economy, 1870-1910p. 11
Farmers and Wealth Distribution in Hunt County, Texas, 1870-1910p. 30
"A Legitimate and Useful Life": Family, Work, and Communityp. 46
"The Same Class of People": Cohesion and Conflictp. 81
"The Land Shall Not Be Sold Forever": Land and God in 1910s Texasp. 125
"Whose Planet Is This Anyway?": Land and the Politics of Dissentp. 161
Conclusionp. 207
Tables for Chapter 2p. 215
Tables for Chapter 3p. 221
Methods for Chapter 3p. 229
Notesp. 235
Bibliographyp. 271
Indexp. 289
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem