Catalogue


Lovesickness and gender in early modern English literature /
Lesel Dawson.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.
description
244 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0199266123, 9780199266128
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.
isbn
0199266123
9780199266128
catalogue key
6676583
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [212]-236) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
an important contribution to the flourishing field of the history of emotions
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Lesel Dawson examines figures afflicted with erotic melancholy in early modern literature and provides a historical context for their malady. She discusses how the literary representation of lovesickness relates to issues of gender and identity, making a contribution to the fields of literature, gender, and medical history.
Main Description
In early modern medical texts, intense unfulfilled erotic desire is held to be a real and virulent disease: it is classified as a species of melancholy, with physical etiologies and cures. Lesel Dawson analyzes literary representations of lovesickness in relation to medical ideas about desire and wider questions about gender and identity, exploring the different ways that desire is believed to take root in the body, how gender roles are encoded and contested in courtship, and the psychic pains and pleasures of frustrated passion. She explores the relationship between women's lovesickness and other female maladies (such as hysteria and greensickness), and asks whether women can suffer from intellectual forms of melancholy generally thought to be exclusively male. Finally, she examines the ways in which Neoplatonism offers an alternative construction of love to that found in natural philosophy and considers how anxieties concerning love's ability to emasculate the male lover emerge indirectly in remedies for lovesickness. With reference to the works of Shakespeare, Beaumont and Fletcher, Middleton, Ford, and Davenant, Lovesickness and Gender in Early Modern English Literature investigates how early modern representations of lovesickness expose contemporary cultural constructions of love, revealing the relation of sexuality to spirituality and the creation and shattering of the impassioned subject. It offers an important contribution to the history of romantic love and will be of interest to students and scholars of literature, gender, and medical history.
Main Description
In early modern medical texts, intense unfulfilled erotic desire is held to be a real and virulent disease: it is classified as a species of melancholy, with physical etiologies and cures. Lesel Dawson analyzes literary representations of lovesickness in relation to medical ideas about desire and wider questions about gender and identity, exploring the different ways that desire is believed to take root in the body, how gender roles are encoded and contested in courtship, and the psychicpains and pleasures of frustrated passion. She explores the relationship between women's lovesickness and other female maladies (such as hysteria and greensickness), and asks whether women can suffer from intellectual forms of melancholy generally thought to be exclusively male. Finally, she examines the ways in which Neoplatonism offers an alternative construction of love to that found in natural philosophy and considers how anxieties concerning love's ability to emasculate the male lover emerge indirectly in remedies for lovesickness. With reference to the works of Shakespeare, Beaumont and Fletcher, Middleton, Ford, and Davenant, Lovesickness and Gender in Early Modern English Literature investigates how early modern representations of lovesickness expose contemporary cultural constructions of love, revealing the relation of sexuality to spirituality and the creation and shattering of the impassioned subject. It offers an important contribution to the history of romantic loveand will be of interest to students and scholars of literature, gender, and medical history.
Main Description
In early modern medical texts, intense unfulfilled erotic desire is held to be a real and virulent disease: it is classified as a species of melancholy, with physical etiologies and cures. Lesel Dawson analyzes literary representations of lovesickness in relation to medical ideas about desireand wider questions about gender and identity, exploring the different ways that desire is believed to take root in the body, how gender roles are encoded and contested in courtship, and the psychic pains and pleasures of frustrated passion. She explores the relationship between women's lovesicknessand other female maladies (such as hysteria and greensickness), and asks whether women can suffer from intellectual forms of melancholy generally thought to be exclusively male. Finally, she examines the ways in which Neoplatonism offers an alternative construction of love to that found in naturalphilosophy and considers how anxieties concerning love's ability to emasculate the male lover emerge indirectly in remedies for lovesickness. With reference to the works of Shakespeare, Beaumont and Fletcher, Middleton, Ford, and Davenant, Lovesickness and Gender in Early Modern English Literature investigates how early modern representations of lovesickness expose contemporary cultural constructions of love, revealing the relation ofsexuality to spirituality and the creation and shattering of the impassioned subject. It offers an important contribution to the history of romantic love and will be of interest to students and scholars of literature, gender, and medical history.
Main Description
This study examines figures afflicted with erotic melancholy in early modern literature, providing a historical context for their malady, and discussing how the literary representation of lovesickness relates to wider issues of gender and identity. It offers an important contribution to the history of romantic love and will be of interest to students and scholars of literature, gender, and medical history.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Sweet Poison
'My Love is as a Fever': Medical Constructions of Desire in Early Modern England
'A Thirsty Womb': Lovesickness, Green Sickness, Hysteria, and Uterine Fury
Beyond Ophelia: The Anatomy of Female Melancholy
Lovesickness and Neoplatonism
'Griefs Will Have their Vent': Physical and Psychological Remedies for Lovesickness
Menstruation, Misogyny, and the Cure for Love
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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