Catalogue


Critical republicanism : the Hijab controversy and political philosophy /
Cécile Laborde.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.
description
vii, 385 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199550212 (hbk.), 9780199550210 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.
isbn
0199550212 (hbk.)
9780199550210 (hbk.)
catalogue key
6665670
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A provocative and stimulating read...Laborde's work above all facilitates a transatlantic conversation about the meaning of republicanism in modern political thought...A surefooted and intelligent guide to debates over identity politics in France...models a way to think about reforming 'non-ideal' societies and deserves the attention to anyone seriously interested in doing so."--French Politics, Culture and Society
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A comprehensive analysis of the philosophical issues raised by the hijab controversy in France, this text also conducts a dialogue between contemporary Anglo-American and French political theory and defends a progressive republican solution to multicultural conflicts in contemporary societies.
Main Description
The first comprehensive analysis of the philosophical issues raised by the hijab controversy in France, this book also conducts a dialogue between contemporary Anglo-American and French political theory and defends a progressive republican solution to multicultural conflicts in contemporary societies. It presents a powerful case against the 2004 ban on religious signs (particularly the Muslim hijab) in French schools, but argues that some of therepublican ideals underpinning it are worth preserving and reformulating. It defends a progressive, critical republican theory of secularism (equality), non-domination (liberty) and civic solidarity (fraternity), which offers a distinctively new approach to the management of religious and cultural pluralism in Westernsocieties.
Main Description
The first comprehensive analysis of the philosophical issues raised by the hijab controversy in France, this book also conducts a dialogue between contemporary Anglo-American and French political theory and defends a progressive republican solution to so-called multicultural conflicts in contemporary societies. It critically assesses the official republican philosophy of la cit which purported to justify the 2004 ban on religious signs in schools. La cit is shown to encompass a comprehensive theory of republican citizenship, centered on three ideals: equality (secular neutrality of the public sphere), liberty (individual autonomy and emancipation) and fraternity (civic loyalty to the community of citizens). Challenging official interpretations of la cit , the book then puts forward a critical republicanism which does not support the hijab ban, yet upholds a revised interpretation of three central republican commitments: secularism, non-domination and civic solidarity. Thus, it articulates a version of secularism which squarely addresses the problem of status quo bias--the fact that Western societies are historically not neutral towards all religions. It also defends a vision of female emancipation which rejects the coercive paternalism inherent in the regulation of religious dress, yet does not leave individuals unaided in the face of religious and secular, patriarchal and ethnocentric domination. Finally, the book outlines a theory of immigrant integration which places the burden of civic integration on basic socio-political institutions, rather than on citizens themselves. Critical republicanism proposes an entirely new approach to the management of religious and cultural pluralism, centerd on the pursuit of the progressive ideal of non-domination in existing, non-ideal societies. Oxford Political Theorypresents the best new work in contemporary political theory. It is intended to be broad in scope, including original contributions to political philosophy, and also work in applied political theory. The series will contain works of outstanding quality with no restriction as to approach or subject matter. Series Editors: Will Kymlicka, David Miller, and Alan Ryan.
Main Description
The first comprehensive analysis of the philosophical issues raised by the hijab controversy in France, this book also conducts a dialogue between contemporary Anglo-American and French political theory and defends a progressive republican solution to so-called multicultural conflicts in contemporary societies. It critically assesses the official republican philosophy of laïcité which purported to justify the 2004 ban on religious signs in schools. Laïcité is shown to encompass a comprehensive theory of republican citizenship, centered on three ideals: equality (secular neutrality of the public sphere), liberty (individual autonomy and emancipation) and fraternity (civic loyalty to the community of citizens). Challenging official interpretations of laïcité, the book then puts forward a critical republicanism which does not support the hijab ban, yet upholds a revised interpretation of three central republican commitments: secularism, non-domination and civic solidarity. Thus, it articulates a version of secularism which squarely addresses the problem of status quo bias--the fact that Western societies are historically not neutral towards all religions. It also defends a vision of female emancipation which rejects the coercive paternalism inherent in the regulation of religious dress, yet does not leave individuals unaided in the face of religious and secular, patriarchal and ethnocentric domination. Finally, the book outlines a theory of immigrant integration which places the burden of civic integration on basic socio-political institutions, rather than on citizens themselves. Critical republicanism proposes an entirely new approach to the management of religious and cultural pluralism, centerd on the pursuit of the progressive ideal of non-domination in existing, non-ideal societies. Oxford Political Theory presents the best new work in contemporary political theory. It is intended to be broad in scope, including original contributions to political philosophy, and also work in applied political theory. The series will contain works of outstanding quality with no restriction as to approach or subject matter. Series Editors: Will Kymlicka, David Miller, and Alan Ryan.
Main Description
The first comprehensive analysis of the philosophical issues raised by the hijab controversy in France, this book also conducts a dialogue between contemporary Anglo-American and French political theory and defends a progressive republican solution to so-called multicultural conflicts incontemporary societies. It critically assesses the official republican philosophy of laicite which purported to justify the 2004 ban on religious signs in schools. Laicite is shown to encompass a comprehensive theory of republican citizenship, centered on three ideals: equality (secular neutralityof the public sphere), liberty (individual autonomy and emancipation) and fraternity (civic loyalty to the community of citizens). Challenging official interpretations of laicite, the book then puts forward a critical republicanism which does not support the hijab ban, yet upholds a revisedinterpretation of three central republican commitments: secularism, non-domination and civic solidarity. Thus, it articulates a version of secularism which squarely addresses the problem of status quo bias - the fact that Western societies are historically not neutral towards all religions. It alsodefends a vision of female emancipation which rejects the coercive paternalism inherent in the regulation of religious dress, yet does not leave individuals unaided in the face of religious and secular, patriarchal and ethnocentric domination. Finally, the book outlines a theory of immigrantintegration which places the burden of civic integration on basic socio-political institutions, rather than on citizens themselves. Critical republicanism proposes an entirely new approach to the management of religious and cultural pluralism, centred on the pursuit of the progressive ideal ofnon-domination in existing, non-ideal societies. Oxford Political Theory presents the best new work in contemporary political theory. It is intended to be broad in scope, including original contributions to political philosophy, and also work in applied political theory. The series will contain works of outstanding quality with no restriction asto approach or subject matter. Series Editors: Will Kymlicka, David Miller, and Alan Ryan.
Table of Contents
Political Philosophy, Social Theory, and Critical Republicanismp. 1
Egalite and Republican Neutrality
Official Republicanism, Equality, and the Hijabp. 31
Tolerant Secularism and the Critique of Republican Neutralityp. 56
Critical Republicanism, Secularism, and Impartialityp. 80
Liberte and Republican Autonomy
Official Republicanism, Liberty, and the Hijabp. 101
Female Agency and the Critique of Republican Paternalismp. 125
Critical Republicanism, Non-Domination, and Voicep. 149
Fraternite and Republican Solidarity
Official Republicanism, Solidarity, and the Hijabp. 173
Social Exclusion and the Critique of Republican Nationalismp. 202
Critical Republicanism, Civic Patriotism, and Social Integrationp. 229
Conclusionp. 254
Notesp. 258
Bibliographyp. 334
Indexp. 377
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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