Catalogue


Runaway daughters : seduction, elopement, and honor in nineteenth-century Mexico /
Kathryn A. Sloan.
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2008.
description
xi, 244 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0826344771 (paper), 9780826344779 (paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2008.
isbn
0826344771 (paper)
9780826344779 (paper)
contents note
The physical and historical world of runaway daughters and their suitors -- The legal and normative world of runaway daughters and their suitors -- Making love in Mexico : the cultural context of courtship and gender relations -- Bearing witness : courtship and working-class neighborhoods -- Disobedient daughters and the liberal state : generational conflicts over marriage choice -- Runaway daughters : sexual honor and sources of female power.
catalogue key
6664069
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 219-237) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Kathryn A. Sloan is assistant professor of history at the University of Arkansas
Summaries
Main Description
Against the backdrop of nineteenth-century Oaxaca City, Kathryn Sloan analyzes raptotrials--cases of abduction and/or seduction of a minor--to gain insight beyond the actual crime and into the reality that testimonies by parents, their children, and witnesses reveal about courtship practices, generational conflict, the negotiation of honor, and the relationship between the state and its working-class citizens in post colonial Mexico.Unlike the colonial era where paternal rule was absolute, Sloan found that the state began to usurp parental authority in the home with the introduction of liberal reform laws. As these laws began to shape the terms of civil marriage, the courtroom played a more significant role in the resolution of familial power struggles and the restoration of family honor in raptocases. Youths could now exert a measure of independence by asserting their rights to marry whom they wished. In examining these growing rifts between the liberal state and familial order within its lower order citizens, Sloan highlights the role that youths and the working class played in refashioning systems of marriage, honor, sexuality, parental authority, and filial obedience.
Main Description
Against the backdrop of nineteenth-century Oaxaca City, Kathryn Sloan analyzes raptotrials--cases of abduction and/or seduction of a minor--to gain insight beyond the actual crime and into the reality that testimonies by parents, their children, and witnesses reveal about courtship practices, generational conflict, the negotiation of honor, and the relationship between the state and its working-class citizens in post colonial Mexico. Unlike the colonial era where paternal rule was absolute, Sloan found that the state began to usurp parental authority in the home with the introduction of liberal reform laws. As these laws began to shape the terms of civil marriage, the courtroom played a more significant role in the resolution of familial power struggles and the restoration of family honor in raptocases. Youths could now exert a measure of independence by asserting their rights to marry whom they wished. In examining these growing rifts between the liberal state and familial order within its lower order citizens, Sloan highlights the role that youths and the working class played in refashioning systems of marriage, honor, sexuality, parental authority, and filial obedience.
Main Description
Against the backdrop of nineteenth-century Oaxaca City, Kathryn Sloan analyzes rapto trials--cases of abduction and/or seduction of a minor--to gain insight beyond the actual crime and into the reality that testimonies by parents, their children, and witnesses reveal about courtship practices, generational conflict, the negotiation of honor, and the relationship between the state and its working-class citizens in post colonial Mexico. Unlike the colonial era where paternal rule was absolute, Sloan found that the state began to usurp parental authority in the home with the introduction of liberal reform laws. As these laws began to shape the terms of civil marriage, the courtroom played a more significant role in the resolution of familial power struggles and the restoration of family honor in rapto cases. Youths could now exert a measure of independence by asserting their rights to marry whom they wished. In examining these growing rifts between the liberal state and familial order within its lower order citizens, Sloan highlights the role that youths and the working class played in refashioning systems of marriage, honor, sexuality, parental authority, and filial obedience.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Against the backdrop of 19th-century Oaxaca City, Sloan analyzes 'rapto' trials (cases of abduction and/or seduction of a minor) to gain insight into what the testimonies by parents, their children, and witnesses reveal about courtship between the state and its working-class citizens in post colonial Mexico.
Table of Contents
Maps and Figuresp. viii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
The Physical and Historical World of Runaway Daughters and Their Suitorsp. 13
The Legal and Normative World of Runaway Daughters and Their Suitorsp. 32
Making Love in Mexico: The Cultural Context of Courtship and Gender Relationsp. 62
Bearing Witness: Courtship and Working-Class Neighborhoodsp. 103
Disobedient Daughters and the Liberal State: Generational Conflicts over Marriage Choicep. 130
Runaway Daughters: Sexual Honor and Sources of Female Powerp. 155
Conclusionp. 178
Notesp. 185
Bibliographyp. 219
Indexp. 238
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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