Catalogue


A modern history of Japan : from Tokugawa times to the present /
Andrew Gordon.
edition
2nd ed.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.
description
xiv, 400 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0195339223 (paper), 9780195339222 (paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.
isbn
0195339223 (paper)
9780195339222 (paper)
catalogue key
6660953
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 357-365) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Andrew Gordon is the Lee and Juliet Folger Fund Professor of History and Director of the Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2002-10-15:
A Chinese saying has it that "each step changes the mountain." Likewise, each major turn in history changes how we understand what went before: as Japan now continues in an economic funk that followed but did not wipe out the "economic miracle" of the postwar period, we need to rethink our histories once again to explain the origins of prosperity, the evolution of what it means to be Japanese, and the roots of obstinacy. Gordon's clearheaded, readable, and inquisitive narrative, aimed at students and serious general readers, accomplishes this task molto con brio. Head of Harvard's Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Gordon tells a sweeping and provocative story of Japan's political, economic, social, and cultural inventions of its modernity in evolving international contexts, incorporating inside viewpoints and debates. Beyond identifying the national stages (feudalism, militarism, democracy), the author innovatively emphasizes how labor unions, cultural figures, and groups in society (especially women) have been affected over time and have responded. Recommended both for general libraries and for specialist collections.-Charles W. Hayford, Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2003-06-01:
Gordon was appointed Reischauer Institute director and professor at Harvard University at a young age; consequently, one would expect a well-informed and lively introductory textbook from him. This volume does not disappoint. Current students say it reads well and is useful, although some new to Japanese studies find it challenging. Faculty will be impressed by the book's range, depth, and the versatility of materials used. A Web site supports the book with time lines, sample exam and essay questions, and some documents. Gordon's specialization is labor history, and he is best in dealing with social and economic forces, but he also fully treats women, foreigners, poetry, and popular culture. The book has a number of illustrations and tables, but too few maps. A glossary of terms unfamiliar to students would be helpful. There are a number of competitor texts on modern Japan, including the recent Japan: A Modern History (CH, Jun'02), by James McClain, and Marius Jansen's The Making of Modern Japan (CH, Apr'01). Although both are authoritative and excellent, they are very long for a one-semester course. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduate collections and above. R. B. Lyman Jr. Brandeis University
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
An exploration of Japanese history from the last days of the Tokugawa shogunate to the beginning of the 21st century. The author shows how Japanese modernization transformed the country from semi-colony to world power.
Long Description
The Modern History of Japan: From Tokugawa Times to the Present, Second Edition, paints a richly nuanced and strikingly original portrait of the last two centuries of Japanese history. It takes students from the days of the shogunate - the feudal overlordship of the Tokugawa family - through the modernizing revolution launched by midlevel samurai in the late nineteenth century; the adoption of Western hairstyles, clothing, and military organization; and the nation's firstexperiments with mass democracy after World War I. Author Andrew Gordon offers the finest synthesis to date of Japan's passage through militarism, World War II, the American occupation, and the subsequent economic rollercoaster. The true ingenuity and value of Gordon's approach lies in his close attention to the non-elite layers of society. Here students will see the influence of outside ideas, products, and culture on home life, labor unions, political parties, gender relations, and popular entertainment. The book examines Japan's struggles to define the meaning of its modernization, from villages and urban neighborhoods, to factory floors and middle managers' offices, to the imperial court. Most importantly, itilluminates the interconnectedness of Japanese developments with world history, demonstrating how Japan's historical passage represents a variation of a process experienced by many nations and showing how the Japanese narrative forms one part of the interwoven fabric of modern history. This secondedition incorporates increased coverage of both Japan's role within East Asia - particularly with China, Korea, and Manchuria - as well as expanded discussions of cultural and intellectual history. With a sustained focus on setting modern Japan in a comparative and global context, The Modern History of Japan, Second Edition, is ideal for undergraduate courses in modern Japanese history, Japanese politics, Japanese society, or Japanese culture.
Main Description
A Modern History of Japan: From Tokugawa Times to the Present, Second Edition, paints a richly nuanced and strikingly original portrait of the last two centuries of Japanese history. It takes students from the days of the shogunate--the feudal overlordship of the Tokugawa family--through the modernizing revolution launched by midlevel samurai in the late nineteenth century; the adoption of Western hairstyles, clothing, and military organization; and the nation's first experiments with mass democracy after World War I. Author Andrew Gordon offers the finest synthesis to date of Japan's passage through militarism, World War II, the American occupation, and the subsequent economic rollercoaster. The true ingenuity and value of Gordon's approach lies in his close attention to the non-elite layers of society. Here students will see the influence of outside ideas, products, and culture on home life, labor unions, political parties, gender relations, and popular entertainment. The book examines Japan's struggles to define the meaning of its modernization, from villages and urban neighborhoods, to factory floors and middle managers' offices, to the imperial court. Most importantly, it illuminates the interconnectedness of Japanese developments with world history, demonstrating how Japan's historical passage represents a variation of a process experienced by many nations and showing how the Japanese narrative forms one part of the interwoven fabric of modern history. This second edition incorporates increased coverage of both Japan's role within East Asia--particularly with China, Korea, and Manchuria--as well as expanded discussions of cultural and intellectual history. With a sustained focus on setting modern Japan in a comparative and global context, A Modern History of Japan, Second Edition, is ideal for undergraduate courses in modern Japanese history, Japanese politics, Japanese society, or Japanese culture.
Main Description
The Modern History of Japan paints a richly nuanced and strikingly original portrait of the last two centuries of Japanese history. It takes students from the days of the shogunate - the feudal overlordship of the Tokugawa family - through the modernizing revolution launched by midlevel samurai in the late nineteenth century; the adoption of Western hairstyles, clothing, and military organization; and the nation's first experiments with mass democracy after World War I. Gordon offers the finest synthesis to date of Japan's passage through militarism, World War II, the American occupation, and the subsequent economic rollercoaster. But the true ingenuity and value of Gordon's approach lies in his close attention to the non-elite layers of society. Here students will see the influence of outside ideas, products, and culture on home life, labor unions, political parties, gender relations, and popular entertainment. Most importantly, it illuminates the interconnectedness of Japanesedevelopments with world history, demonstrating how Japan's historical passage represents a variation of a process experienced by many nations, and shows how the Japanese narrative forms one part of the interwoven fabric of modern history. This new edition incorporates increased coverage of both Japan's role within East Asia (particular with China, Korea, and Manchuria), as well as cultural and intellectual history.
Main Description
The Modern History of Japan paints a richly nuanced and strikingly original portrait of the last two centuries of Japanese history. It takes students from the days of the shogunate - the feudal overlordship of the Tokugawa family - through the modernizing revolution launched by midlevelsamurai in the late nineteenth century; the adoption of Western hairstyles, clothing, and military organization; and the nation's first experiments with mass democracy after World War I. Gordon offers the finest synthesis to date of Japan's passage through militarism, World War II, the Americanoccupation, and the subsequent economic rollercoaster. But the true ingenuity and value of Gordon's approach lies in his close attention to the non-elite layers of society. Here students will see the influence of outside ideas, products, and culture on home life, labor unions, political parties,gender relations, and popular entertainment. Most importantly, it illuminates the interconnectedness of Japanese developments with world history, demonstrating how Japan's historical passage represents a variation of a process experienced by many nations, and shows how the Japanese narrative formsone part of the interwoven fabric of modern history. This new edition incorporates increased coverage of both Japan's role within East Asia (particular with China, Korea, and Manchuria), as well as cultural and intellectual history.
Table of Contents
Maps, Tables, and Figuresp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Introduction: Enduring Imprints of the Longer Pastp. 3
Crisis of the Tokugawa Regimep. 10
The Tokugawa Polityp. 11
Unificationp. 11
The Tokugawa Political Settlementsp. 13
The Daimyop. 14
The Imperial Institutionp. 16
The Samuraip. 16
Villagers and City-Dwellersp. 17
The Margins of the Japanese and Japanp. 18
Social and Economic Transformationsp. 22
The Seventeenth-Century Boomp. 22
Riddles of Stagnation and Vitalityp. 28
The Intellectual World of Late Tokugawap. 35
Ideological Foundations of the Tokugawa Regimep. 35
Cultural Diversity and Contradictionsp. 37
Reform, Critiques, and Insurgent Ideasp. 42
The Overthrow of the Tokugawap. 47
The Western Powers and the Unequal Treatiesp. 47
The Crumbling of Tokugawa Rulep. 51
Politics of Terror and Accommodationp. 54
Bakufu Revival, the Satsuma-Choshu Insurgency, and Domestic Unrestp. 57
Modern Revolution, 1868-1905p. 60
The Samurai Revolutionp. 61
Programs of Nationalist Revolutionp. 62
Political Unification and Central Bureaucracyp. 62
Eliminating the Status Systemp. 64
The Conscript Armyp. 66
Compulsory Educationp. 67
The Monarch at the Centerp. 68
Building a Rich Countryp. 70
Stances toward the Worldp. 72
Participation and Protestp. 76
Political Discourse and Contentionp. 77
Movement for Freedom and People's Rightsp. 79
Samurai Rebellions, Peasant Uprisings, and New Religionsp. 84
Participation for Womenp. 87
Treaty Revision and Domestic Politicsp. 89
The Meiji Constitutionp. 91
Social, Economic, and Cultural Transformationsp. 93
Landlords and Tenantsp. 93
Industrial Revolutionp. 95
The Work Force and Labor Conditionsp. 98
Spread of Mass and Higher Educationp. 103
Culture and Religionp. 106
Affirming Japanese Identity and Destinyp. 110
Empire and Domestic Orderp. 113
The Trajectory to Empirep. 113
Contexts of Empire, Capitalism, and Nation-Buildingp. 122
The Turbulent World of Diet Politicsp. 125
The Era of Popular Protestp. 129
Engineering Nationalismp. 134
Imperial Japan from Ascendance to Ashesp. 138
Economy and Societyp. 139
Wartime Boom and Postwar Bustp. 139
Landlords, Tenants, and Rural Lifep. 144
City Life: Middle and Working Classesp. 148
Cultural Responses to Social Changep. 154
Democracy and Empire between the World Warsp. 161
The Emergence of Party Cabinetsp. 162
The Structure of Parliamentary Governmentp. 164
Ideological Challengesp. 166
Strategies of Imperial Democratic Rulep. 169
Japan, Asia, and the Western Powersp. 172
The Depression Crisis and Responsesp. 181
Economic and Social Crisisp. 181
Breaking the Impasse: New Departures Abroadp. 185
Toward a New Social and Economic Orderp. 191
Toward a New Political Orderp. 195
Japan in Wartimep. 202
Wider War in Chinap. 202
Toward Pearl Harborp. 204
The Pacific Warp. 207
Mobilizing for Total Warp. 209
Living in the Shadow of Warp. 215
Ending the Warp. 219
Burdens and Legacies of Warp. 222
Occupied Japan: New Departures and Durable Structuresp. 224
Bearing the Unbearablep. 224
The American Agenda: Demilitarize and Democratizep. 227
Japanese Responsesp. 232
The Reverse Coursep. 237
Toward Recovery and Independence: Another Unequal Treaty?p. 238
Postwar and Contemporary Japan, 1952-2000p. 242
Economic and Social Transformationsp. 243
The Postwar "Economic Miracle"p. 243
Transwar Patterns of Community, Family, School, and Workp. 249
Shared Experiences and Standardized Lifeways of the Postwar Erap. 251
Differences Enduring and Realignedp. 256
Managing Social Stability and Changep. 259
Images and Ideologies of Social Stability and Changep. 262
Political Struggles and Settlements of the High-Growth Erap. 268
Political Strugglesp. 268
The Politics of Accommodationp. 277
Global Connections: Oil Crisis and the End of High Growthp. 285
Global Power in a Polarized World: Japan in the 1980sp. 289
New Roles in the World and New Tensionsp. 289
Economy: Thriving through the Oil Crisesp. 296
Politics: The Conservative Heydayp. 299
Society and Culture in the Exuberant Eightiesp. 303
Beyond the Postwar Erap. 308
The End of Showap. 308
The Specter of a Divided Societyp. 310
Economy of the "Lost Decade"p. 316
The Fall and Rise of the Liberal Democratic Partyp. 321
Assessing Reforms, Explaining Recoveryp. 328
Between Asia and the Westp. 329
Ongoing Presence of the Pastp. 333
Prime Ministers of Japan, 1885-2007p. 335
Notesp. 337
Select Bibliographyp. 357
Indexp. 367
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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