Catalogue


Archival storytelling : a filmmaker's guide to finding, using, and licensing third-party visuals and music /
Sheila Curran Bernard, Kenn Rabin.
imprint
Amsterdam ; Boston : Focal Press, c2009.
description
ix, 326 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0240809734 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780240809731 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Amsterdam ; Boston : Focal Press, c2009.
isbn
0240809734 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780240809731 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6658089
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 309-315) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is it. The book that will save you thousands of dollars and untold hours of frustration. It will be the single best purchase your production company will make."-Ann Petrone, Archival Supervisor, The Fog of War"This the definitive guide for archival research for documentary filmmakers. An invaluable resource." -Mark Jonathan Harris, University of Southern California, and writer/director, The Long Way Home and Into the Arms of Strangers"One of the best-and most needed-texts I have seen in a while." --Bruce Sheridan, Columbia College-Chicago
"This is it. The book that will save you thousands of dollars and untold hours of frustration. It will be the single best purchase your production company will make."-Ann Petrone, Archival Supervisor, The Fog of War "One of the best-and most needed-texts I have seen in a while..The challenge is to keep what is a fairly technical aspect of filmmaking interesting without compromising the quality and depth of information. The authors have done an exceptional job in this regard by the careful interweaving of interviews with researchers, filmmakers and legal experts through the factual material.There is the strong sense of being in the presence of experienced filmmakers and researchers who accept that while there are standard practices, archival use and intellectual property laws etc. are contingent fields in which each case must be assessed and dealt with on its merits." -Bruce Sheridan, Chair, Film & Video Department, Columbia College Praise for Archival Storytelling "One of the best-and most needed-texts I have seen in a while....The challenge is to keep what is a fairly technical aspect of filmmaking interesting without compromising the quality and depth of information. The authors have done an exceptional job in this regard by the careful interweaving of interviews with researchers, filmmakers and legal experts through the factual material.There is the strong sense of being in the presence of experienced filmmakers and researchers who accept that while there are standard practices, archival use and intellectual property laws etc. are contingent fields in which each case must be assessed and dealt with on its merits." -Bruce Sheridan, Chair, Film & Video Department, Columbia College "Here we have what I believe will swiftly become an essential guide for documentary filmmakers with an archive bias, and anyone thinking of becoming a film researcher." - James Smith, Archive Zones "I've been making historical documentaries for many years, yet I learned new things from this book. This is the definitive guide for archival research for documentary filmmakers. An invaluable resource." -Mark Jonathan Harris, Distinguished Professor, School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern California, and writer/director, The Long Way Home and Into the Arms of Strangers "It's hard to imagine a more organized, comprehensive dissection of Byzantine material. The authors have produced a tremendous guide for all who use archival resources. Best of all, because of their effort, I believe more individuals will be able to access and properly utilize such material. This book will serve filmmakers and, in turn, the public for years to come." -Thomas Speicher, Producer, Pennsylvania College of Technology "Not simply a 'how-to' manual, it is also a discussion of ideas, issues and history that creates an enjoyable text even when the subject matter becomes complicated.The real world examples, the roundtable discussions, and the exploration of ideas and issues surrounding the technical aspects are very welcome and well done." -Dustin Ogdin, Filmmaker, Spoke Digital Films "I've been making historical documentaries for many years, yet I learned new things from this book. This is the definitive guide for archival research for documentary filmmakers. An invaluable resource." -Mark Jonathan Harris, Distinguished Professor, School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern California, and writer/director, The Long Way Home and Into the Arms of Strangers "It's hard to imagine a more organized, comprehensive dissection of Byzantine material. The authors have produced a tremendous guide for all who use archival resources. Best of all, because of their effort, I believe more individuals will be able to access and properly utilize such material. This book will serve filmmakers and, in turn, the public for years to come." -Thomas Speicher, Producer, Pennsylvania College of Technology "Not simply
"This is it. The book that will save you thousands of dollars and untold hours of frustration. It will be the single best purchase your production company will make."-Ann Petrone, Archival Supervisor, The Fog of War "Here we have what I believe will swiftly become an essential guide for documentary filmmakers with an archive bias, and anyone thinking of becoming a film researcher." - James Smith, Archive Zones "Copyright and clearance is such a minefield for filmmakers who are frequently faced with the double whammy of complex legal rules and enormous licensing expenses. This book is a great resource because it surveys the entire landscape from ethical/creative considerations to fair use to changes in the digital age, and the focus is always on the importance of telling stories. Which is what it is all about after all!" - Shooting People The excellent new resource Archival Storytelling is really two books in one: a detailed how-to guide for filmmakers on the process of researching, acquiring and clearing rights to archival materials, and a deeper exploration of the implications, ethical and creative, of using these materials to tell new stories. - American Archivist
"This is it. The book that will save you thousands of dollars and untold hours of frustration. It will be the single best purchase your production company will make."-Ann Petrone, Archival Supervisor, The Fog of War"Here we have what I believe will swiftly become an essential guide for documentary filmmakers with an archive bias, and anyone thinking of becoming a film researcher." - James Smith, Archive Zones"Copyright and clearance is such a minefield for filmmakers who are frequently faced with the double whammy of complex legal rules and enormous licensing expenses. This book is a great resource because it surveys the entire landscape from ethical/creative considerations to fair use to changes in the digital age, and the focus is always on the importance of telling stories. Which is what it is all about after all!" - Shooting People
Praise for Archival Storytelling "One of the best-and most needed-texts I have seen in a while..The challenge is to keep what is a fairly technical aspect of filmmaking interesting without compromising the quality and depth of information. The authors have done an exceptional job in this regard by the careful interweaving of interviews with researchers, filmmakers and legal experts through the factual material.There is the strong sense of being in the presence of experienced filmmakers and researchers who accept that while there are standard practices, archival use and intellectual property laws etc. are contingent fields in which each case must be assessed and dealt with on its merits." -Bruce Sheridan, Chair, Film & Video Department, Columbia College "I've been making historical documentaries for many years, yet I learned new things from this book. This is the definitive guide for archival research for documentary filmmakers. An invaluable resource." -Mark Jonathan Harris, Distinguished Professor, School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern California, and writer/director, The Long Way Home and Into the Arms of Strangers "It's hard to imagine a more organized, comprehensive dissection of Byzantine material. The authors have produced a tremendous guide for all who use archival resources. Best of all, because of their effort, I believe more individuals will be able to access and properly utilize such material. This book will serve filmmakers and, in turn, the public for years to come." -Thomas Speicher, Producer, Pennsylvania College of Technology "Not simply a 'how-to' manual, it is also a discussion of ideas, issues and history that creates an enjoyable text even when the subject matter becomes complicated.The real world examples, the roundtable discussions, and the exploration of ideas and issues surrounding the technical aspects are very welcome and well done." -Dustin Ogdin, Filmmaker, Spoke Digital Films Praise for Bernard's Documentary Storytelling: "With the availability of high-quality affordable cameras and editing equipment, documentary filmmakers today enjoy a freedom in shaping their films that their counterparts a decade ago couldn't have imagined. As the new aesthetic is shaped, Sheila Curran Bernard's brilliant and effective Documentary Storytelling.aims to guide the Errol Morrises of tomorrow with great advice and practical knowledge that every documentarian would benefit from." -BackStage "With all the buzz over blockbuster docs, Focal Press serves up a perfectly timed winner in a much-neglected area. True to the nature of the beast, the book is more about filmmaking as a whole, and how and where storytelling weaves into the overall process. It succeeds in covering every aspect without belabouring any. Not only does Bernard write from the viewpoint of an award-winning filmmaker (she's a writer, director and producer), but the last 100 pages include extensive interviews with a wide range of acclaimed documentarians." -Canadian Screenwriter (Writers Guild of Canada) "...[A] pragmatic exploration of the role of narrative in nonfiction filmmaking...In writing this volume Bernard demonstrates to documentarians how story can be more effectively incorporated into every level of nonfiction filmmaking from conception to development and pre-production, in the field and in the editing room. Her discussions incorporate many examples from contemporary documentaries to illustrate a variety of salient points." -Documentary (International Documentary Association) "While documentaries are nonfiction, they are certainly not objective, and even the smallest choices in writing, filming, interviewing, narrating, or scoring can drastically alter the perspective of the film, and in turn, the audience. Bernard is keenly aware of the power of persuasive images, and her insistence on complexity and integrity is a consistent theme throughout the book."
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Summaries
Main Description
Archival Storytelling is an essential, pragmatic guide to one of the most challenging issues facing filmmakers today: the use of images and music that belong to someone else. Where do producers go for affordable stills and footage? How do filmmakers evaluate the historical value of archival materials? What do vérité producers need to know when documenting a world filled with rights-protected images and sounds? How do filmmakers protect their own creative efforts from infringement? Filled with advice and insight from filmmakers, archivists, film researchers, music supervisors, intellectual property experts, insurance executives and others, Archival Storytelling defines key terms-copyright, fair use, public domain, orphan works and more-and challenges filmmakers to become not only archival users but also archival and copyright activists, ensuring their ongoing ability as creators to draw on the cultural materials that surround them. Features conversations with industry leaders including Patricia Aufderheide, Hubert Best, Peter Jaszi, Jan Krawitz, Lawrence Lessig, Stanley Nelson, Rick Prelinger, Geoffrey C. Ward and many others. * Nearly all filmmakers, at some point in their careers, will want to use third-party materials, or will be asked to license their own work to someone else. This book will show you how to do it (and stay on-time and within budget) * This book, by clarifying and defining such terms as fair use, copyright, intellectual property, and Creative Commons, can better prepare media makers to not only protect their own creative rights but to understand and respect those of others. * Additional resources are available on the authors' website: http://www.archivalstorytelling.com
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Archival Storytelling' is an essential, pragmatic guide to one of the most challenging issues facing filmmakers: the use of images and music that belong to someone else. Filled with advice and insight, this text defines key terms such as copyright, fair use, public domain, and orphan works.
Main Description
Archival Storytelling is an essential, pragmatic guide to one of the most challenging issues facing filmmakers today: the use of images and music that belong to someone else. Where do producers go for affordable stills and footage? How do filmmakers evaluate the historical value of archival materials? What do verite'' producers need to know when documenting a world filled with rights-protected images and sounds? How do filmmakers protect their own creative efforts from infringement? Filled with advice and insight from filmmakers, archivists, film researchers, music supervisors, intellectual property experts, insurance executives and others, Archival Storytelling defines key terms-copyright, fair use, public domain, orphan works and more-and challenges filmmakers to become not only archival users but also archival and copyright activists, ensuring their ongoing ability as creators to draw on the cultural materials that surround them. Features conversations with industry leaders including Patricia Aufderheide, Hubert Best, Peter Jaszi, Jan Krawitz, Lawrence Lessig, Stanley Nelson, Rick Prelinger, Geoffrey C. Ward and many others. Additional praise for Archival Storytelling: "I''ve been making historical documentaries for many years, yet I learned new things from this book. This is the definitive guide for archival research for documentary filmmakers. An invaluable resource." -Mark Jonathan Harris, Distinguished Professor, School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern California, and writer/director, The Long Way Home and Into the Arms of Strangers "One of the best-and most needed-[books] I have seen in a while..The challenge is to keep what is a fairly technical aspect of filmmaking interesting without compromising the quality and depth of information. The authors have done an exceptional job in this regard by the careful interweaving of interviews with researchers, filmmakers and legal experts through the factual material.There is the strong sense of being in the presence of experienced filmmakers and researchers who accept that while there are standard practices, archival use and intellectual property laws etc. are contingent fields in which each case must be assessed and dealt with on its merits." -Bruce Sheridan, Chair, Film & Video Department, Columbia College "It''s hard to imagine a more organized, comprehensive dissection of Byzantine material. The authors have produced a tremendous guide for all who use archival resources. Best of all, because of their effort, I believe more individuals will be able to access and properly utilize such material. This book will serve filmmakers and, in turn, the public for years to come." -Thomas Speicher, Producer, Pennsylvania College of Technology "Not simply a ''how-to'' manual, it is also a discussion of ideas, issues and history that creates an enjoyable text even when the subject matter becomes complicated.The real world examples, the roundtable discussions, and the exploration of ideas and issues surrounding the technical aspects are very welcome and well done." -Dustin Ogdin, Filmmaker, Spoke Digital Films "The book properly advances the notion that ''films matter,'' but this is countered by discussants with ''films cost money too.'' Filmmakers may take decades to recoup, and licensing helps. It''s an ongoing volley, the chapter engenders a road map through the split, the tension makes a good read...This authorative book belongs on every producer''s shelf." -Loren S. Miller, Freelance Documentary and Dramatic Editor, Emerson College * Nearly all filmmakers, at some point in their careers, will want to use third-party materials, or will be asked to license their own work to someone else. This book will show you how to do it (and stay on-time and within budget) * This book, by clarifying and defining such terms as fair use, copyright, intellectual property, and Creative Commons, can better prepare media makers to not only protect their own creative rights but to understand and respect those of others. * Additional resources are available on the authors'' website: http://www.archivalstorytelling.com
Back Cover Copy
About the AuthorsSheila Curran Bernard is an Emmy and Peabody Award-winning filmmaker and the author of Documentary Storytelling, a best selling guide to story and structure in nonfiction filmmaking. Her archival film credits include the series Eyes on the Prize, I'll Make Me a World, This Far By Faith, America's War on Poverty, and School, for which she also co-wrote the companion book.Kenn Rabin is an internationally recognized expert on the use of archival materials in film storytelling. His credits include the dramatic features Milk, directed by Gus Van Sant; Good Night, and Good Luck, directed by George Clooney; and The Good German, directed by Steven Soderbergh, in addition to a number of acclaimed archival television series, including the 13-hour Vietnam: A Television History and the 14-hour Eyes on the Prize, for which he was nominated for an Emmy.
Back Cover Copy
Praise for Archival Storytelling: "I am often asked how to work with archival materials. Now I have an easy answer: Get a copy of Archival Storytelling and read it. Everything's there-how to use archival materials, acquire them, and most of all, how to think about them. Archival Storytelling is indispensable."-David Grubin, Filmmaker, LBJ, FDR, Napoleon, and The Jewish Americans "This is it, the book that will save you thousands of dollars and untold hours of frustration. It will be the single best purchase your production company will make. Archival Storytelling clearly explains the entire process of researching, acquiring and licensing archival footage and music. Included are time-tested tips and techniques for efficiently managing the work flow and negotiating rights. "-Ann Petrone, Archival Supervisor, The Fog of War Archival Storytelling is an essential, pragmatic guide to one of the most challenging issues facing filmmakers today: the use of images and music that belong to someone else. Where do producers go for affordable stills and footage? How do filmmakers evaluate the historical value of archival materials? What do vérité producers need to know when documenting a world filled with rights-protected images and sounds? How do filmmakers protect their own creative efforts from infringement? Filled with advice and insight from filmmakers, archivists, film researchers, music supervisors, intellectual property experts, insurance executives and others, Archival Storytelling defines key terms-copyright, fair use, public domain, orphan works and more-and challenges filmmakers to become not only archival users but also archival and copyright activists, ensuring their ongoing ability as creators to draw on the cultural materials that surround them. Features conversations with industry leaders including Patricia Aufderheide, Hubert Best, Peter Jaszi, Jan Krawitz, Lawrence Lessig, Stanley Nelson, Rick Prelinger, Geoffrey C. Ward and many others.
Main Description
Archival Storytellingis an essential, pragmatic guide to one of the most challenging issues facing filmmakers today: the use of images and music that belong to someone else. Where do producers go for affordable stills and footage? How do filmmakers evaluate the historical value of archival materials? What do verite' producers need to know when documenting a world filled with rights-protected images and sounds? How do filmmakers protect their own creative efforts from infringement? Filled with advice and insight from filmmakers, archivists, film researchers, music supervisors, intellectual property experts, insurance executives and others, Archival Storytelling defines key terms-copyright, fair use, public domain, orphan works and more-and challenges filmmakers to become not only archival users but also archival and copyright activists, ensuring their ongoing ability as creators to draw on the cultural materials that surround them. Features conversations with industry leaders including Patricia Aufderheide, Hubert Best, Peter Jaszi, Jan Krawitz, Lawrence Lessig, Stanley Nelson, Rick Prelinger, Geoffrey C. Ward and many others. Additional praise for Archival Storytelling: "I've been making historical documentaries for many years, yet I learned new things from this book. This is the definitive guide for archival research for documentary filmmakers. An invaluable resource." -Mark Jonathan Harris, Distinguished Professor, School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern California, and writer/director, The Long Way Homeand Into the Arms of Strangers "One of the best-and most needed-[books] I have seen in a while..The challenge is to keep what is a fairly technical aspect of filmmaking interesting without compromising the quality and depth of information. The authors have done an exceptional job in this regard by the careful interweaving of interviews with researchers, filmmakers and legal experts through the factual material.There is the strong sense of being in the presence of experienced filmmakers and researchers who accept that while there are standard practices, archival use and intellectual property laws etc. are contingent fields in which each case must be assessed and dealt with on its merits." -Bruce Sheridan, Chair, Film & Video Department, Columbia College "It's hard to imagine a more organized, comprehensive dissection of Byzantine material. The authors have produced a tremendous guide for all who use archival resources. Best of all, because of their effort, I believe more individuals will be able to access and properly utilize such material. This book will serve filmmakers and, in turn, the public for years to come." -Thomas Speicher, Producer, Pennsylvania College of Technology "Not simply a 'how-to' manual, it is also a discussion of ideas, issues and history that creates an enjoyable text even when the subject matter becomes complicated.The real world examples, the roundtable discussions, and the exploration of ideas and issues surrounding the technical aspects are very welcome and well done." -Dustin Ogdin, Filmmaker, Spoke Digital Films "The book properly advances the notion that 'films matter,' but this is countered by discussants with 'films cost money too.' Filmmakers may take decades to recoup, and licensing helps. It's an ongoing volley, the chapter engenders a road map through the split, the tension makes a good read...This authorative book belongs on every producer's shelf." -Loren S. Miller, Freelance Documentary and Dramatic Editor, Emerson College
Back Cover Copy
About the Authors Sheila Curran Bernard is an Emmy and Peabody Award-winning filmmaker and the author of Documentary Storytelling, a best selling guide to story and structure in nonfiction filmmaking. Her archival film credits include the series Eyes on the Prize, I'll Make Me a World, This Far By Faith, America's War on Poverty, and School, for which she also co-wrote the companion book. Kenn Rabin is an internationally recognized expert on the use of archival materials in film storytelling. His credits include the dramatic features Milk, directed by Gus Van Sant; Good Night, and Good Luck, directed by George Clooney; and The Good German, directed by Steven Soderbergh, in addition to a number of acclaimed archival television series, including the 13-hour Vietnam: A Television History and the 14-hour Eyes on the Prize, for which he was nominated for an Emmy.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Finding It
What are archival materials?p. 15
Finding what you needp. 25
Should you hire a professional?p. 51
A global perspective: Conversations with image researchersp. 61
Using It
Practical considerationsp. 85
Ordering what you needp. 97
Creative considerationsp. 117
An ongoing process: A conversation with Geoffrey C. Wardp. 131
Ethical considerations: A roundtable discussionp. 141
Licensing It
Introduction to rights and licensesp. 159
The public domainp. 189
Getting things right: A conversation with Lawrence Lessigp. 201
Fair usep. 211
Fair dealing, moral rights, and more: A conversation with Hubert Bestp. 229
Licensing visualsp. 241
Licensing musicp. 265
Legal considerations: A roundtable discussionp. 283
Afterwordp. 295
Additional Material
Sources and notesp. 303
Booksp. 309
Filmsp. 311
About the authorsp. 317
Indexp. 319
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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