Catalogue


Writing the new Berlin : the German capital in post-Wall literature /
Katharina Gerstenberger.
imprint
Rochester, NY : Camden House ; Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK : Boydell & Brewer [UK distributor], 2008.
description
x, 209 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
157113381X (acid-free paper), 9781571133816 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Rochester, NY : Camden House ; Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK : Boydell & Brewer [UK distributor], 2008.
isbn
157113381X (acid-free paper)
9781571133816 (acid-free paper)
contents note
Introduction: newness and its discontents: Berlin literature in the 1990s and beyond -- Erotic sites: sexual topographies after the Wall -- Bodies and borders: the monsters of Berlin -- Multicultural Germans and Jews of many cultures: imagining "Jewish Berlin" -- Goodbye to East Berlin -- Looking for perspectives: the construction at Potsdamer Platz.
catalogue key
6657371
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [177]-198) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-12-01:
With the fall of the Berlin Wall, Berlin once again became the focus of German life. Gerstenberger (Univ. of Cincinnati) calculates that about 300 texts have struggled to capture the essence of the new Germany as embodied in Berlin--the consuming exhilaration of the new freedom and the scars resulting from the expanding global economy--but none has accomplished the task. Though many have been successful in a limited way--portraying the city as a site of sexual liberation, the frontier between East and West, the locus of united Germany, the home of immigrant (especially Turkish and new Jewish) minorities, an arena of architectural experimentation--none has communicated the essence of the city. Departing noticeably from the political commitment of the 1970s and the solipsism of the 1980s, recent works depend primarily on the background of the author (East German, West German, immigrant) and the generation he or she represents (i.e., whether born between 1930 and 1950 or after 1960). This corpus, writes Gerstenberger, evidences no unifying aesthetic, ideological criteria, or sense of contentment; the styles range from straightforward narrative to experimental, the content from ribald humor to desperate searching. In discussing these ideas, Gerstenberger reveals the realities of the radically revitalized, vibrant German capital. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. C. Conard University of Dayton
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This collection, in the form of about 300 works of fiction, pursues a nuanced understanding of the search for new ways to tell the story of Germany's past and of its importance for the formation of a new German identity.
Main Description
A study of the "patchwork imaginary" that is postwall Berlin fiction and its significance for the new Germany.
Main Description
The wall was still coming down when critics began to call for the great Berlin novel that could explain what was happening to Germany and the Germans. Such a novel never appeared. Instead, writers have created a patchwork imaginary -- in the form of about 300 works of fiction set in Berlin -- of a city and a nation whose identity collapsed virtually overnight. Contributors to this literary collage include established writers like Peter Schneider and Christa Wolf, young authors like Tanja D8ckers and Ingo Schramm, German-Turkish authors Zafer Senocak and Yad_ Kara, and the Austrians Kathrin R_ggla and Marlene Streeruwitz. The non-arrival of the great Berlin novel marks the reorientation in German culture and literature that is the focus of this study: the experience of unification was too diverse, too postmodern, too influenced by global developments to be captured by one novel. Berlin literature of the postunification decade is marked by ambiguity: change is linked to questions of historical continuity; postmodern simulation finds its counterpart in a quest for authenticity; and the assimilation of Germanness into European and global contexts is both liberation and loss. This book pursues a nuanced understanding of the search for new ways to tell the story of Germany's past and of its importance for the formation of a new German identity. Katharina Gerstenberger is associate professor of German at the University of Cincinnati.
Main Description
The wall was still coming down when critics began to call for the great Berlin novel that could explain what was happening to Germany and the Germans. Such a novel never appeared. Instead, writers have created a patchwork imaginary -- in the form of about 300 works of fiction set in Berlin -- of a city and a nation whose identity collapsed virtually overnight. Contributors to this literary collage include established writers like Peter Schneider and Christa Wolf, young authors like Tanja D ckers and Ingo Schramm, German-Turkish authors Zafer Senocak and Yad Kara, and the Austrians Kathrin R ggla and Marlene Streeruwitz. The non-arrival of the great Berlin novel marks the reorientation in German culture and literature that is the focus of this study: the experience of unification was too diverse, too postmodern, too influenced by global developments to be captured by one novel. Berlin literature of the postunification decade is marked by ambiguity: change is linked to questions of historical continuity; postmodern simulation finds its counterpart in a quest for authenticity; and the assimilation of Germanness into European and global contexts is both liberation and loss. This book pursues a nuanced understanding of the search for new ways to tell the story of Germany's past and of its importance for the formation of a new German identity. Katharina Gerstenberger is Professor of German at the University of Cincinnati.
Main Description
The wall was still coming down when critics began to call for the great Berlin novel that could explain what was happening to Germany and the Germans. Such a novel never appeared. Instead, writers have created a patchwork imaginary -- in the form of about 300 works of fiction set in Berlin -- of a city and a nation whose identity collapsed virtually overnight. Contributors to this literary collage include established writers like Peter Schneider and Christa Wolf, young authors like Tanja Dückers and Ingo Schramm, German-Turkish authors Zafer Senocak and Yadé Kara, and the Austrians Kathrin Röggla and Marlene Streeruwitz. The non-arrival of the great Berlin novel marks the reorientation in German culture and literature that is the focus of this study: the experience of unification was too diverse, too postmodern, too influenced by global developments to be captured by one novel. Berlin literature of the postunification decade is marked by ambiguity: change is linked to questions of historical continuity; postmodern simulation finds its counterpart in a quest for authenticity; and the assimilation of Germanness into European and global contexts is both liberation and loss. This book pursues a nuanced understanding of the search for new ways to tell the story of Germany's past and of its importance for the formation of a new German identity. Katharina Gerstenberger is associate professor of German at the University of Cincinnati.
Table of Contents
Newness and Its Discontents: Berlin Literature in the 1990s and Beyondp. 1
Erotic Sites: Sexual Topographies after the Wallp. 24
Bodies and Borders: The Monsters of Berlinp. 52
Multicultural Germans and Jews of Many Cultures: Imagining "Jewish Berlin"p. 77
Goodbye to East Berlinp. 109
Looking for Perspectives: The Construction at Potsdamer Platzp. 141
Conclusionp. 170
Bibliographyp. 177
Indexp. 199
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem