Catalogue


Politics without reason : the perfect world and the liberal ideal /
David P. Levine.
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
description
xi, 207 p.
ISBN
0230603777
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
isbn
0230603777
contents note
Introduction -- Reason, desire and the self -- The flight from reason -- Family values -- Moral renewal -- Deception -- Desire without limit -- The ultimate fulfillment -- Greed, morality and corruption -- Corporate corruption -- An imperfect world.
catalogue key
6656268
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-05-01:
Levine (Univ. of Denver) examines the psychological sources, and reasons for, much contemporary animosity, hate, and ideological arguments against reason, democracy, and liberalism, rather than the ideological content or interrelation of the arguments themselves. Particular forms of desire, images of the self, greed, envy, and the search for a perfect world that will overcome doubt and pain account for much demonization of liberal values and policies. The author's primary examples are drawn from religious fundamentalism, George W. Bush, and the 2004 elections. He offers suggestive connections between development and political behavior, but should draw a much tighter link. For example, how does President Bush's development fit Levine's theory? Chapter ten, "Corporate Corruption," details Levine's continuing research in political economy; and successfully demonstrates that it is fruitful and possible to link psychological theory and the detailed application of the implications of "psychic life" to better understand political behavior and public policy. There are several modern versions of liberalism, and further specification of which liberalism is being discussed would also enhance this potentially significant book. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate, research, and professional collections. C. P. Waligorski emeritus, University of Arkansas
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The thesis of this book is that ambivalence about the self and about desire as an expression of the self fosters the intense animosity we observe directed toward the liberal ideal.
Description for Bookstore
The thesis of the book is that ambivalence about the self and about desire as an expression of the self fosters the intense animosity we observe directed toward the liberal ideal
Main Description
This book explores the common thread holding together seemingly diverse tendencies in attacks on liberalism. The author argues that ambivalence about the self and about desire as an expression of the self fosters the intense animosity we observe directed toward the liberal ideal. Ambivalence arises because the self is viewed as the locus of a destructive form of desire, one that must be controlled and repressed. The author argues that speaking of ambivalence toward the self is another way of speaking of ambivalence toward freedom, an ambivalence expressed in the impulse toward coercion that plays such a powerful role in the attack on liberalism.
Main Description
This book explores the common thread holding together seemingly diverse tendencies in attacks on liberalism.& The author argues that ambivalence about the self and about desire as an expression of the self fosters the intense animosity we observe directed toward the liberal ideal.& Ambivalence arises because the self is viewed as the locus of a destructive form of desire, one that must be controlled and repressed.& The author argues that speaking of ambivalence toward the self is another way of speaking of ambivalence toward freedom, an ambivalence expressed in the impulse toward coercion that plays such a powerful role in the attack on liberalism.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. 3
Reason, Desire, and the Selfp. 13
The Fight from Reasonp. 39
Family Valuesp. 57
Family Valuesp. 57
Moral Renewalp. 79
Deceptionp. 97
Desire without Limitp. 115
The Ultimate Fulfillmentp. 133
Greed, Morality, and Corruptionp. 151
Corporate Corruptionp. 169
An Imperfect Worldp. 189
Notesp. 193
Referencesp. 197
Indexp. 203
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem