Catalogue


Mongolian Buddhism : the rise and fall of the Sangha /
by Michael K. Jerryson.
imprint
Chiang Mai, Thailand : Silkworm Books, 2007.
description
240 p. : ill., maps ; 21 cm.
ISBN
9749511263, 9789749511268
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chiang Mai, Thailand : Silkworm Books, 2007.
isbn
9749511263
9789749511268
language note
Includes interviews translated from Mongolian.
catalogue key
6650499
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 225-232) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Mongolian Buddhismis the first book to explore the development of Mongolia's state religion, from its formation in the thirteenth century around the time of Chinggis Qaan (Genghis Khan) until its demise in the twentieth century under the Soviet Union.Until its downfall, Mongolian Buddhism had served as a scientific, political, and medical resource for the Mongolian people. During the 1930s, Mongolian Buddhist monasticism, the caretaker of these resources, was methodically and systematically demolished. Lamas were forced to apostatize, and were either enslaved or executed. Now, after the fall of the Soviet Union, Mongolian Buddhism has re-emerged in a country that has yet to fully confront its bloody past.Through historical analysis of Tibetan, Chinese, and Russian accounts of history, Michael Jerryson offers a much-needed religio-political perspective on the ebb and flow of Buddhism and the Sangha in Mongolia.Michael K. Jerryson is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara.
Main Description
Mongolian Buddhism is the first book to explore the development of Mongolia's state religion, from its formation in the thirteenth century around the time of Chinggis Qaan (Genghis Khan) until its demise in the twentieth century under the Soviet Union. Until its downfall, Mongolian Buddhism had served as a scientific, political, and medical resource for the Mongolian people. During the 1930s, Mongolian Buddhist monasticism, the caretaker of these resources, was methodically and systematically demolished. Lamas were forced to apostatize, and were either enslaved or executed. Now, after the fall of the Soviet Union, Mongolian Buddhism has reemerged in a country that has yet to fully confront its bloody past. Through historical analysis of Tibetan, Chinese, and Russian accounts of history, Michael Jerryson offers a much-needed religio-political perspective on the ebb and flow of Buddhism and the Sangha in Mongolia. Michael K. Jerryson is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Early Mongolian Buddhism (1246-1691)p. 11
Mongolian Buddhism under the Ch'ing Dynasty (1691-1911)p. 25
Periods of Autonomy in Early Twentieth Century Mongolia (1911-1921)p. 35
The Beginnings of the Mongolian People's Revolutionary Party (1921-1929)p. 49
Voices from the Reign of Terror in Buddhist Mongolia (1929-1940)p. 67
Socialism to Democracy (1940-2000)p. 97
Mongolia's Voices-Personal Narrativesp. 119
Notesp. 173
Glossaryp. 221
Bibliographyp. 225
Indexp. 233
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem