Catalogue


A multitude of women : the challenges of the contemporary Italian novel /
Stefania Lucamante.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2008.
description
ix, 324 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780802097941 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2008.
isbn
9780802097941 :
catalogue key
6643369
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [297]-313) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
A Multitude of Women looks at the ways in which both Italian literary tradition and external influences have assisted Italian women writers in rethinking the theoretical and aesthetic ties between author, text, and readership in the construction of the novel. Stefania Lucamante discusses the valuable contributions that Italian women writers have made to the contemporary novel and illustrates the relevance of the novelistic examples set by their predecessors. She addresses various discursive communities, reading works by Di Lascia, Ferrante, Vinci, and others with reference to intertextuality and the theories of Elsa Morante and Simone de Beauvoir.This study identifies a positive deviation from literary and ideological orthodoxy, a deviation that helps give meaning to the Italian novel and to transform the traditional notion of the canon in Italian literature. Lucamante argues that this is partly due to the merits of women writers and their ability to eschew obsolete patterns in narrative while favouring forms that are more attuned to the ever-changing needs of society. She shows that contemporary novels by women authors mirror a shift from previous trends in which the need for female emancipation interfered with the actual literary and aesthetic significance of the novel. A Multitude of Women offers a new epistemology of the novel and will appeal to those interested in women's writing, readership, Italian studies, and literary studies in general.
Main Description
A Multitude of Womenlooks at the ways in which both Italian literary tradition and external influences have assisted Italian women writers in rethinking the theoretical and aesthetic ties between author, text, and readership in the construction of the novel. Stefania Lucamante discusses the valuable contributions that Italian women writers have made to the contemporary novel and illustrates the relevance of the novelistic examples set by their predecessors. She addresses various discursive communities, reading works by Di Lascia, Ferrante, Vinci, and others with reference to intertextuality and the theories of Elsa Morante and Simone de Beauvoir. This study identifies a positive deviation from literary and ideological orthodoxy, a deviation that helps give meaning to the Italian novel and to transform the traditional notion of the canon in Italian literature. Lucamante argues that this is partly due to the merits of women writers and their ability to eschew obsolete patterns in narrative while favouring forms that are more attuned to the ever-changing needs of society. She shows that contemporary novels by women authors mirror a shift from previous trends in which the need for female emancipation interfered with the actual literary and aesthetic significance of the novel. A Multitude of Womenoffers a new epistemology of the novel and will appeal to those interested in women's writing, readership, Italian studies, and literary studies in general.
Description for Reader
A Multitude of Women looks at the ways in which both Italian literary tradition and external influences have assisted Italian women writers in rethinking the theoretical and aesthetic ties between author, text, and readership in the construction of the novel. Stefania Lucamante discusses the valuable contributions that Italian women writers have made to the contemporary novel and illustrates the relevance of the novelistic examples set by their predecessors. She addresses various discursive communities, reading works by Di Lascia, Ferrante, Vinci, and others with reference to intertextuality and the theories of Elsa Morante and Simone de Beauvoir. This study identifies a positive deviation from literary and ideological orthodoxy, a deviation that helps give meaning to the Italian novel and to transform the traditional notion of the canon in Italian literature. Lucamante argues that this is partly due to the merits of women writers and their ability to eschew obsolete patterns in narrative while favouring forms that are more attuned to the ever-changing needs of society. She shows that contemporary novels by women authors mirror a shift from previous trends in which the need for female emancipation interfered with the actual literary and aesthetic significance of the novel. A Multitude of Women offers a new epistemology of the novel and will appeal to those interested in women's writing, readership, Italian studies, and literary studies in general.
Table of Contents
What Women Writers Do with the Knowability of the Worldp. 3
'Writing Is Always Playing with the Mother's Body': Mothers' Rewritesp. 28
Of Fathers and Daughters, or the Italian Family Interruptedp. 109
Italian Sexual Patho-Politics Revisitedp. 181
Conclusionsp. 234
Notesp. 243
Works Citedp. 297
Indexp. 315
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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