Catalogue


The 51% minority : how women still are not equal and what you can do about it /
Lis Wiehl.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Ballantine Books, c2007.
description
xx, 266 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780345469212 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
author
imprint
New York : Ballantine Books, c2007.
isbn
9780345469212 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6635989
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [243]-258) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
Chapter 1 EQUAL = EQUAL "I have the right to be president and mommy" There's much speculation that we'll have a woman running for president of the United States as early as 2008. According to a Siena College Research Institute survey, 81 percent of voters across the country are ready to vote for a woman for president, 62 percent say the country is ready for a woman president, and 52 percent of voters feel that a president's gender wouldn't matter when it came to foreign affairs. In the 86 years we've been able to vote, only one woman has been on a major party ticket: Geraldine Ferraro as running mate to Walter Mondale in 1984. "Even God herself couldn't have changed that outcome with the Reagan ticket," Ferraro says, reflecting on that election. "But I'll tell you, if a woman were president today, we wouldn't be at war in Iraq. And though the administration didn't cause Hurricane Katrina, a woman would have responded differentlythe response would have been immediate, with much more empathy, and the guys who screwed up would have been fired immediately." In her book Closing the Leadership Gap, White House Project founder Marie Wilson quotes the Rev. Patricia Kitchen: "For over 200 years, the United States has been steered by male leadership who tend to lead from a self-centered, self-preservation perspective. Women around the world are inclined to lead, their families and nations, from an other-centered perspective." "For the most part women are much more collaborative and inclusive," Washington governor Christine Gregoire said. "Women won't just announce a decisionit's going to be done this way or that way. We have the attitude of 'Let's try to talk through the issues,' which avoids confrontation and controversy. That's my style and I've observed it in a lot of women." "Outsiders often bring clarity of vision, as well as a sense of discovery and innovation," Anna Quindlen wrote in her "Last Word" column for Newsweek's special report on how women lead. "Women are not the only ones capable of this. But the difficulties they've encountered while seeking representation and respect may provide the steel and strength needed to embrace change. You're less wedded to the shape of the table if you haven't been permitted to sit at it." At the table of leaders and decision makers, we remain outsiders. For every ten men in executive roles in this country there is only one woman, a number that has changed little in twenty years. As for those who sit in judgment of the cases that establish legal precedent in this country, there are 629 male federal judges, 199 female. And in the history of our country 98.25 percent of our senators have been men. What has this male dominated leadership decided? That they'll let us know what we can and can't do. Instead of making it easier on women, the Bush administration has made decisions that have made being a woman even harder. During this administration, child care programs have been underfunded and undermined, making such drastic cuts that only one out of seven children eligible for federal child care assistance receives help. By the Bush administration's own estimates, this change will result in 300,000 children losing child care assistance by 2009. This isn't helping children, this isn't helping women, and this isn't helping our society. This administration's tax cuts have also affected women and children. In addition to the drastic cuts in child care programs, p
First Chapter
Chapter 1

EQUAL = EQUAL

“I have the right to be president and mommy”

There’s much speculation that we’ll have a woman running for president of the United States as early as 2008. According to a Siena College Research Institute survey, 81 percent of voters across the country are ready to vote for a woman for president, 62 percent say the country is ready for a woman president, and 52 percent of voters feel that a president’s gender wouldn’t matter when it came to foreign affairs.

In the 86 years we’ve been able to vote, only one woman has been on a major party ticket: Geraldine Ferraro as running mate to Walter Mondale in 1984. “Even God herself couldn’t have changed that outcome with the Reagan ticket,” Ferraro says, reflecting on that election. “But I’ll tell you, if a woman were president today, we wouldn’t be at war in Iraq. And though the administration didn’t cause Hurricane Katrina, a woman would have responded differently—the response would have been immediate, with much more empathy, and the guys who screwed up would have been fired immediately.”

In her book Closing the Leadership Gap, White House Project founder Marie Wilson quotes the Rev. Patricia Kitchen: “For over 200 years, the United States has been steered by male leadership who tend to lead from a self-centered, self-preservation perspective. Women around the world are inclined to lead, their families and nations, from an other-centered perspective.”

“For the most part women are much more collaborative and inclusive,” Washington governor Christine Gregoire said. “Women won’t just announce a decision—it’s going to be done this way or that way. We have the attitude of ‘Let’s try to talk through the issues,’ which avoids confrontation and controversy. That’s my style and I’ve observed it in a lot of women.”

“Outsiders often bring clarity of vision, as well as a sense of discovery and innovation,” Anna Quindlen wrote in her “Last Word” column for Newsweek’s special report on how women lead. “Women are not the only ones capable of this. But the difficulties they’ve encountered while seeking representation and respect may provide the steel and strength needed to embrace change. You’re less wedded to the shape of the table if you haven’t been permitted to sit at it.”

At the table of leaders and decision makers, we remain outsiders. For every ten men in executive roles in this country there is only one woman, a number that has changed little in twenty years. As for those who sit in judgment of the cases that establish legal precedent in this country, there are 629 male federal judges, 199 female. And in the history of our country 98.25 percent of our senators have been men.

What has this male dominated leadership decided? That they’ll let us know what we can and can’t do. Instead of making it easier on women, the Bush administration has made decisions that have made

being a woman even harder. During this administration, child care programs have been underfunded and undermined, making such drastic cuts that only one out of seven children eligible for federal child care assistance receives help. By the Bush administration’s own estimates, this change will result in 300,000 children losing child care assistance by 2009. This isn’t helping children, this isn’t helping women, and this isn’t helping our society.

This administration’s tax cuts have also affected women and children. In addition to the drastic cuts in child care programs, programs such as housing subsidies, Pell grants to help pay for college, and aid to state and local governments have been slashed in order to pay for these cuts. The average tax cut for mil
Reviews
Review Quotes
Advance praise for The 51% Minority "Frequently we hear that young women don't realize how many battles have been fought to guarantee them the rights they enjoy today. In The 51% Minority, Lis Wiehl recalls that history and points out what is left to be done for American women to achieve full equality." Geraldine A. Ferraro, former vice presidential candidate "Yes! Finally! Here is the hidden history of the women's movement in America. The political and legal drama in these pages is at the heart of any true history of American civil rights." Juan Williams, NPR, senior correspondent "With wit, eloquence, and insight, Lis Wiehl explores what women need to dopersonally and politicallyto achieve equal treatment." Deborah L. Rhode, director, Stanford Center on Ethics "An important discussion of the many ways in which women in the United States remain unequal in the twenty-first century. In clear, understandable language, and with compelling accounts of real women's stories, this book is a must-read for anyone concerned about women's full and equal participation in our society." Lenora M. Lapidus, director, Women's Rights Project, ACLU "Equal rights for all should be non-negotiable. Lis Wiehl shows why we as women must stop taking no for an answer and exactly how to do just that. The 51% Minority should be in every woman's house, whether homemaker, CEO, or both." Barbara Corcoran, co-author of Use What You've Got "A serious and timely wake-up call. Wiehl explains how many of our treasured rights are under attack and how we must respond. Every woman in America should read this book." Catherine Crier, anchor, Court TV and bestselling author From the Hardcover edition.
Advance praise for The 51% Minority "Frequently we hear that young women don't realize how many battles have been fought to guarantee them the rights they enjoy today. In The 51% Minority, Lis Wiehl recalls that history and points out what is left to be done for American women to achieve full equality." -Geraldine A. Ferraro, former vice presidential candidate "Yes! Finally! Here is the hidden history of the women's movement in America. The political and legal drama in these pages is at the heart of any true history of American civil rights." -Juan Williams, NPR, senior correspondent "With wit, eloquence, and insight, Lis Wiehl explores what women need to do-personally and politically-to achieve equal treatment." -Deborah L. Rhode, director, Stanford Center on Ethics "An important discussion of the many ways in which women in the United States remain unequal in the twenty-first century. In clear, understandable language, and with compelling accounts of real women's stories, this book is a must-read for anyone concerned about women's full and equal participation in our society." -Lenora M. Lapidus, director, Women's Rights Project, ACLU "Equal rights for all should be non-negotiable. Lis Wiehl shows why we as women must stop taking no for an answer and exactly how to do just that. The 51% Minority should be in every woman's house, whether homemaker, CEO, or both." -Barbara Corcoran, co-author of Use What You've Got "A serious and timely wake-up call. Wiehl explains how many of our treasured rights are under attack and how we must respond. Every woman in America should read this book." -Catherine Crier, anchor, Court TV and bestselling author
Advance praise for The 51% Minority " Frequently we hear that young women don't realize how many battles have been fought to guarantee them the rights they enjoy today. In The 51% Minority, Lis Wiehl recalls that history and points out what is left to be done for American women to achieve full equality." - Geraldine A. Ferraro, former vice presidential candidate " Yes! Finally! Here is the hidden history of the women's movement in America. The political and legal drama in these pages is at the heart of any true history of American civil rights." - Juan Williams, NPR, senior correspondent " With wit, eloquence, and insight, Lis Wiehl explores what women need to do- personally and politically- to achieve equal treatment." - Deborah L. Rhode, director, Stanford Center on Ethics " An important discussion of the many ways in which women in the United States remain unequal in the twenty-first century. In clear, understandable language, and with compelling accounts of real women's stories, this book is a must-read for anyone concerned about women's full and equal participation in our society." - Lenora M. Lapidus, director, Women's Rights Project, ACLU " Equal rights for all should be non-negotiable. Lis Wiehl shows why we as women must stop taking no for an answer and exactly how to do just that. The 51% Minority should be in every woman's house, whether homemaker, CEO, or both." - Barbara Corcoran, co-author of Use What You've Got " A serious and timely wake-up call. Wiehl explains how many of ourtreasured rights are under attack and how we must respond. Every woman in America should read this book." - Catherine Crier, anchor, Court TV and bestselling author
Advance praise for The 51% Minority "Frequently we hear that young women don't realize how many battles have been fought to guarantee them the rights they enjoy today. In The 51% Minority, Lis Wiehl recalls that history and points out what is left to be done for American women to achieve full equality." Geraldine A. Ferraro, former vice presidential candidate "Yes! Finally! Here is the hidden history of the women's movement in America. The political and legal drama in these pages is at the heart of any true history of American civil rights." Juan Williams, NPR, senior correspondent "With wit, eloquence, and insight, Lis Wiehl explores what women need to dopersonally and politicallyto achieve equal treatment." Deborah L. Rhode, director, Stanford Center on Ethics "An important discussion of the many ways in which women in the United States remain unequal in the twenty-first century. In clear, understandable language, and with compelling accounts of real women's stories, this book is a must-read for anyone concerned about women's full and equal participation in our society." Lenora M. Lapidus, director, Women's Rights Project, ACLU "Equal rights for all should be non-negotiable. Lis Wiehl shows why we as women must stop taking no for an answer and exactly how to do just that. The 51% Minority should be in every woman's house, whether homemaker, CEO, or both." Barbara Corcoran, co-author of Use What You've Got "A serious and timely wake-up call. Wiehl explains how many of our treasured rights are under attack and how we must respond. Every woman in America should read this book." Catherine Crier, anchor, Court TV and bestselling author
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
The Fox News commentator, a former federal prosecutor, makes the case against Bush.
Main Description
"Lis Wiehl tells us where the law protects us, and where it is letting us down. And as a bonus she gives us the tools to make change happen! If you care about where we are going, you have to read this book." Rita Cosby, Emmy Award-winning TV host Women make up 51% of the American population, yet still aren't treated equally to men in areas that matter most. In this provocative new book, Lis Wiehl, one of the country's top federal prosecutors, reveals the legal and social inequalities women must face in their daily livesand provides a "Tool Box" for dealing with a variety of issues. From boardroom to courtroom, from pregnancy to contraception, from unequal pay to domestic violence, women are more often than not handed the short end of the stick. A woman earns seventy-three cents for every dollar a man makes. The law labels pregnancy a "disability." Domestic violence remains the single biggest threat of injury to women in America. The federal government continues to increase funding for abstinence-only education, even though it's proven to put our daughters at greater risk for unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases. Health insurance plans are more likely to cover Viagra prescriptions than birth control pills. What's worse, we're also weighed down by a myriad of troubling attitudes: The media bombard us with images of young, perfect-bodied women; acid-tongued commentators label us "feminazi" if we try to claim equal treatment; and the current chief justice of the Supreme Court has a history of opposing legislative and legal attempts to strengthen women's rights, and questions "whether encouraging homemakers to become lawyers contributes to the common good." Why are powerful women viewed with consternation while powerful men instill respect? Why is it that for every ten men in an executive, decision-making role in this country, there is only one woman in that same role? Why do our federal courts continue to be stacked with male judges even though women receive more than half of all law degrees? And why shouldn't a woman be president? Enough! Women are not equal in our society or under our laws and the remedy is quite simple: Besides being the majority of the population, we also control the economy, spending 80 percent of every discretionary dollar, and given that 54 percent of voters are female, we can swing an election. With our numbers we can do something about it. This is a critical moment: We can either take the road toward equality or allow ourselves to be driven further away from fair treatment. The 51% Minority is a clarion call to the silent majority to take a stand . . . before it's too late. From the Hardcover edition.
Main Description
"Lis Wiehl tells us where the law protects us, and where it is letting us down. And as a bonus she gives us the tools to make change happen! If you care about where we are going, you have to read this book." Rita Cosby, Emmy Award-winning TV host Women make up 51% of the American population, yet still aren't treated equally to men in areas that matter most. In this provocative new book, Lis Wiehl, one of the country's top federal prosecutors, reveals the legal and social inequalities women must face in their daily livesand provides a "Tool Box" for dealing with a variety of issues. From boardroom to courtroom, from pregnancy to contraception, from unequal pay to domestic violence, women are more often than not handed the short end of the stick. A woman earns seventy-three cents for every dollar a man makes. The law labels pregnancy a "disability." Domestic violence remains the single biggest threat of injury to women in America. The federal government continues to increase funding for abstinence-only education, even though it's proven to put our daughters at greater risk for unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases. Health insurance plans are more likely to cover Viagra prescriptions than birth control pills. What's worse, we're also weighed down by a myriad of troubling attitudes: The media bombard us with images of young, perfect-bodied women; acid-tongued commentators label us "feminazi" if we try to claim equal treatment; and the current chief justice of the Supreme Court has a history of opposing legislative and legal attempts to strengthen women's rights, and questions "whether encouraging homemakers to become lawyers contributes to the common good." Why are powerful women viewed with consternation while powerful men instill respect? Why is it that for every ten men in an executive, decision-making role in this country, there is only one woman in that same role? Why do our federal courts continue to be stacked with male judges even though women receive more than half of all law degrees? And why shouldn't a woman be president? Enough! Women are not equal in our society or under our laws and the remedy is quite simple: Besides being the majority of the population, we also control the economy, spending 80 percent of every discretionary dollar, and given that 54 percent of voters are female, we can swing an election. With our numbers we can do something about it. This is a critical moment: We can either take the road toward equality or allow ourselves to be driven further away from fair treatment. The 51% Minority is a clarion call to the silent majority to take a stand . . . before it's too late.
Long Description
"Lis Wiehl tells us where the law protects us, and where it is letting us down. And as a bonus she gives us the tools to make change happen! If you care about where we are going, you have to read this book." -Rita Cosby, Emmy Award-winning TV host Women make up 51% of the American population, yet still aren't treated equally to men in areas that matter most. In this provocative new book, Lis Wiehl, one of the country's top federal prosecutors, reveals the legal and social inequalities women must face in their daily lives-and provides a "Tool Box" for dealing with a variety of issues. From boardroom to courtroom, from pregnancy to contraception, from unequal pay to domestic violence, women are more often than not handed the short end of the stick. - A woman earns seventy-three cents for every dollar a man makes. - The law labels pregnancy a "disability." - Domestic violence remains the single biggest threat of injury to women in America. - The federal government continues to increase funding for abstinence-only education, even though it's proven to put our daughters at greater risk for unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases. - Health insurance plans are more likely to cover Viagra prescriptions than birth control pills. What's worse, we're also weighed down by a myriad of troubling attitudes: The media bombard us with images of young, perfect-bodied women; acid-tongued commentators label us "feminazi" if we try to claim equal treatment; and the current chief justice of the Supreme Court has a history of opposing legislative and legal attempts to strengthen women's rights, and questions "whether encouraging homemakers to become lawyerscontributes to the common good."" " Why are powerful women viewed with consternation while powerful men instill respect? Why is it that for every ten men in an executive, decision-making role in this country, there is only one woman in that same role? Why do our federal courts continue to be stacked with male judges even though women receive more than half of all law degrees? And why shouldn't a woman be president? Enough! Women are not equal in our society or under our laws and the remedy is quite simple: Besides being the majority of the population, we also control the economy, spending 80 percent of every discretionary dollar, and given that 54 percent of voters are female, we can swing an election. With our numbers we can do something about it. This is a critical moment: We can either take the road toward equality or allow ourselves to be driven further away from fair treatment. The 51% Minority is a clarion call to the silent majority to take a stand . . . before it's too late." "
Table of Contents
Introduction: One Step Forward, Two Steps Backp. xi
Equal=Equalp. 3
Equal Payp. 15
Sexual Harassmentp. 41
Pregnancyp. 61
Age and Weightp. 82
Marriagep. 103
Violence Against Womenp. 125
My Bodyp. 151
The Social Compactp. 174
Women's Toolboxp. 133
Acknowledgmentsp. 241
Bibliographyp. 243
Indexp. 259
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem