Catalogue

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Broken brotherhood : the rise and fall of the National Afro-American Council /
Benjamin R. Justesen.
imprint
Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, c2008.
description
xv, 257 p., [4] p. of plates : ill., ports. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0809328437 (alk. paper), 9780809328437 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, c2008.
isbn
0809328437 (alk. paper)
9780809328437 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6635489
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 243-249) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Benjamin R. Justesen is the author of George Henry White: An Even Chance in the Race of Life and editor of In His Own Words: Speeches and Letters of George Henry White
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-08-01:
Justesen ventilates the life of the National Afro-American Council, which struggled to maintain relevancy between 1898 and 1908. The author expertly reveals the story of the council's politics and battles, which led to destructive factions that ultimately killed the organization. Justesen argues that the council achieved little, but it was the first truly national organization that battled Jim Crow in the South. Although many notable figures are part of the story, the author's main focus is on Timothy Thomas Fortune, Alexander Walters, George Henry White, and Booker T. Washington. Of these four, Justesen wrote, "Together [they] shaped an imperfect brotherhood that held near-unchallenged moral sway over millions of the downtrodden for almost a decade." By the end, the council was hijacked by the Niagara Movement and in 1908 "simply ceased to exist," but its long-forgotten legacy lives on in the NAACP. Justesen's wonderfully researched volume should be a welcome supplement to African American history and civil rights collections. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-level undergraduates and above. R. D. Screws University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
Broken Brotherhood: The Rise and Fall of the National Afro-American Council gives a comprehensive account of the first truly nationwide U.S. civil rights organization, which existed from 1898 to 1908. Based on exhaustive research, the volume chronicles the Council's achievements and its annual meetings and provides portraits of its key leaders, including journalist T. Thomas Fortune, Bishop Alexander Walters, educator Booker T. Washington, and Congressman George Henry White.
Main Description
Broken Brotherhood: The Rise and Fall of the National Afro-American Council gives a comprehensive account of the National Afro-American Council, the first truly nationwide U.S. civil rights organization, which existed from 1898 to 1908. Based on exhaustive research, the volume chronicles the Council's achievements and its annual meetings and provides portraits of its key leaders. Led by four of the most notable African American leaders of the time--journalist T. Thomas Fortune, Bishop Alexander Walters, educator Booker T. Washington, and Congressman George Henry White--the Council persevered for a decade despite structural flaws and external pressures that eventually led to its demise in 1908. Author Benjamin R. Justesen provides historical context for the Council's development during an era of unprecedented growth in African American organizations. Justesen establishes the National Afro-American Council as the earliest national arena for discussions of critical social and political issues affecting African Americans and the single most important united voice lobbying for protection of the nation's largest minority. In a period marked by racial segregation, widespread disfranchisement, and lynching violence, the nonpartisan council helped establish two more enduring successor organizations, providing core leadership for both the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the National Urban League. Broken Brotherhood traces the history of the Council and the complicated relationships among key leaders from its creation in Rochester in 1898 to its last gathering in Baltimore in 1907, drawing on both private correspondence and contemporary journalism to create a balanced historical portrait. Enhanced by thirteen illustrations, the volume also provides intriguing details about the ten national gatherings, describes the Council's unsuccessful attempt to challenge disfranchisement before the U.S. Supreme Court, and sheds light on the gradual breakdown of Republican solidarity among African American leaders in the first decade of the twentieth century.
Main Description
Broken Brotherhood: The Rise and Fall of the National Afro-American Council gives a comprehensive account of the National Afro-American Council, the first truly nationwide U.S. civil rights organization, which existed from 1898 to 1908. Based on exhaustive research, the volume chronicles the Council's achievements and its annual meetings and provides portraits of its key leaders. Led by four of the most notable African American leaders of the timejournalist T. Thomas Fortune, Bishop Alexander Walters, educator Booker T. Washington, and Congressman George Henry Whitethe Council persevered for a decade despite structural flaws and external pressures that eventually led to its demise in 1908. Author Benjamin R. Justesen provides historical context for the Council's development during an era of unprecedented growth in African American organizations. Justesen establishes the National Afro-American Council as the earliest national arena for discussions of critical social and political issues affecting African Americans and the single most important united voice lobbying for protection of the nation's largest minority. In a period marked by racial segregation, widespread disfranchisement, and lynching violence, the nonpartisan council helped establish two more enduring successor organizations, providing core leadership for both the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the National Urban League. Broken Brotherhood traces the history of the Council and the complicated relationships among key leaders from its creation in Rochester in 1898 to its last gathering in Baltimore in 1907, drawing on both private correspondence and contemporary journalism to create a balanced historical portrait. Enhanced by thirteen illustrations, the volume also provides intriguing details about the ten national gatherings, describes the Council's unsuccessful attempt to challenge disfranchisement before the U.S. Supreme Court, and sheds light on the gradual breakdown of Republican solidarity among African American leaders in the first decade of the twentieth century.
Main Description
Broken Brotherhood:The Rise and Fall of the National Afro-American Councilgives a comprehensive account of the National Afro-American Council, the first truly nationwide U.S. civil rights organization, which existed from 1898 to 1908. Based on exhaustive research, the volume chronicles the Council's achievements and its annual meetings and provides portraits of its key leaders. Led by four of the most notable African American leaders of the time--journalist T. Thomas Fortune, Bishop Alexander Walters, educator Booker T. Washington, and Congressman George Henry White--the Council persevered for a decade despite structural flaws and external pressures that eventually led to its demise in 1908. Author Benjamin R. Justesen provides historical context for the Council's development during an era of unprecedented growth in African American organizations. Justesen establishes the National Afro-American Council as the earliest national arena for discussions of critical social and political issues affecting African Americans and the single most important united voice lobbying for protection of the nation's largest minority. In a period marked by racial segregation, widespread disfranchisement, and lynching violence, the nonpartisan council helped establish two more enduring successor organizations, providing core leadership for both the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the National Urban League. Broken Brotherhoodtraces the history of the Council and the complicated relationships among key leaders from its creation in Rochester in 1898 to its last gathering in Baltimore in 1907, drawing on both private correspondence and contemporary journalism to create a balanced historical portrait. Enhanced by thirteen illustrations, the volume also provides intriguing details about the ten national gatherings, describes the Council's unsuccessful attempt to challenge disfranchisement before the U.S. Supreme Court, and sheds light on the gradual breakdown of Republican solidarity among African American leaders in the first decade of the twentieth century.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. IX
Acknowledgmentsp. XIII
Abbreviationsp. XV
Introduction: The Four Titansp. 1
Resurrecting the League: Rochester, 1898p. 8
The Black Judases: Washington, D.C., 1898p. 16
All Eyes on McKinley: Chicago, 1899p. 38
Playing at Presidential Politics: Indianapolis, 1900p. 53
Nowhere Else to Turn: Philadelphia, 1901p. 83
Fortune at the Helm: Saint Paul, 1902p. 101
Dueling Portraits: Louisville, 1903p. 121
Enduring the Interregnum: Saint Louis, 1904p. 141
Walters Redux: Detroit, 1905p. 152
Competing with Niagara: New York City, 1906p. 168
Farewell to the Wizard: Baltimore, 1907p. 184
Epilogue: Slouching toward Columbusp. 202
National Afro-American Council Constitutionp. 211
Notesp. 215
Bibliographyp. 243
Indexp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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