Catalogue


Greek religion and culture, the Bible, and the ancient Near East /
by Jan N. Bremmer.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2008.
description
xviii, 424 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9004164731 (hardback : alk. paper), 9789004164734 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2008.
isbn
9004164731 (hardback : alk. paper)
9789004164734 (hardback : alk. paper)
local note
Victoria University Library copy donated by The Friends of Victoria University Library.
catalogue key
6634209
 
Gift to Victoria University Library. Friends of Victoria University Library. 2010/02/23.
Includes bibliographical references (p. [357]-400) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jan N. Bremmer (Ph.D. 1979) is professor of Religious Studies at the University of Groningen. He has published extensively on Greek, Roman, Early Christian and contemporary religion, including Greek Religion (1994) and The Rise and Fall of the Afterlife (2002)
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2008
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This book contributes to the interest in the relationship between Greek religion and culture and the ancient Near East, studying the Near Eastern background of certain Greek myths and cultural tropes. It also shows that, in turn, Greek literature influenced Jewish stories of divine epiphanies and the Christian notion of atonement.
Description for Reader
All those interested in myth & religion and the interrelationship between Greece and the Ancient Near East, as well as classicists, biblical scholars, students of the Near East, and historians of religion.
Long Description
In the last decades there has been an increasing interest in the relationship between Greek religion & culture and the Ancient Near East. This challenging book contributes greatly to this interest by studying the Near Eastern background of important Greek myths, such as those of the creation of the world and the first woman, the Flood, the Golden Fleece, the Titans and travelling seers, but also of the births of Attis and Asclepius as well as the origins of the terms 'paradise' and 'magic'. It also shows that, in turn, Greek literature influenced Jewish stories of divine epiphanies and that the Greek scapegoat myths and rituals contributed to the central Christian notion of atonement.
Main Description
In the last decades there has been an increasing interest in the relationship between Greek religion & culture and the Ancient Near East. This challenging book contributes greatly to this interest by studying the Near Eastern background of important Greek myths, such as those of the creation of the world and the first woman, the Flood, the Golden Fleece, the Titans and travelling seers, but also of the births of Attis and Asclepius as well as the origins of the terms paradise and magic . It also shows that, in turn, Greek literature influenced Jewish stories of divine epiphanies and that the Greek scapegoat myths and rituals contributed to the central Christian notion of atonement.
Main Description
This book greatly enhances our knowledge of the interrelationship of Greek religion & culture and the Ancient Near East by offering important analyses of Greek myths, divinities and terms like 'magic' and 'paradise', but also of the Greek contribution to the Christian notion of atonement.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xv
Conventions and Abbreviationsp. xvii
Canonical and Alternative Creation Mythsp. 1
Pandora or the Creation of a Greek Evep. 19
The Birth of Paradisep. 35
The First Crime: Brothers and Fratricide in the Ancient Mediterraneanp. 57
Greek Fallen Angels: Kronos and the Titansp. 73
Near Eastern and Native Traditions in Apollodorus' Account of the Floodp. 101
Don't Look Back: From the Wife of Lot to Orpheus and Eurydicep. 117
Balaam, Mopsus and Melampous: Tales of Travelling Seersp. 133
Hebrew Lishkah and Greek Leschep. 153
The Scapegoat between Northern Syria, Hittites, Israelites, Greeks and Early Christiansp. 169
Close Encounters of the Third Kind: Heliodorus in the Temple and Paul on the Road to Damascusp. 215
Persian Magoi and the Birth of the Term 'Magic'p. 235
Anaphe, Apollo Aigletes and the Origin of Asclepiusp. 249
Attis: A Greek God in Anatolian Pessinous and Catullan Romep. 267
The Myth of the Golden Fleecep. 303
Genesis 1.1: A Jewish Response to a Persian Challenge?p. 339
Magic and Religion?p. 347
The Spelling and Meaning of the Name Megabyxosp. 353
Bibliographyp. 357
Index of Names, Subjects and Passagesp. 401
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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