Catalogue


The godfather of tabloid : Generoso Pope Jr. and the National enquirer /
Jack Vitek.
imprint
Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2008.
description
viii, 290 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
ISBN
0813125030 (acid-free paper), 9780813125039 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2008.
isbn
0813125030 (acid-free paper)
9780813125039 (acid-free paper)
contents note
The man in perspective -- Family connections -- Kid Wheeler-Dealer -- Friends in low places -- From gore to groceries -- A second start -- Rocketing up -- Perfecting the formula -- Lantana 33464 -- The million-dollar tree : ho! ho! ho! -- Washington garbage -- Manufacturing "truth" -- The peak of tabloid : Elvis -- Reporter as gladiator -- Star wars : Hollywood versus the Enquirer -- Wacky world news (tabloid II) -- Anger as satire -- Second peak (two gardeners' stories) -- Sudden death, ironically -- The Enquirer after Pope -- Pope in perspective.
catalogue key
6620803
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 280-283) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-01-01:
Vitek (journalism and English, Edgewood College) profiles the life and livelihood of the founding owner of National Enquirer, a man who is one of the least-known media magnates of the second half of the 20th century. Although Vitek notes Pope's family connections to New York City Mafia figures, friendship with mob attorney Roy Cohn, and brief work for the CIA, the book mostly discusses Pope's hands-on role in the newsroom. Unlike many publishers, Pope was a meticulous news editor; indeed, he exercised so much editorial control that staff members referred to the Enquirer as "Popestown." Vitek notes how Pope's unpredictable personality mirrored the symptoms of Asperger's syndrome, from which he apparently suffered. Pope is described as a philanthropist, who reinvested most of the Enquirer's profits back into the publication. In the three segments of interest to students of journalism, Vitek describes the Enquirer's transformation from a grisly police blotter to a supermarket tabloid in the 1970s, notes how the Enquirer's editors paid sources and ignored veracity, and explains how the staff embellished stories. Easy to read and including helpful footnotes and a bibliography, this book will particularly interest libraries in Florida, where Pope was an influential citizen. Summing Up: Recommended. Comprehensive journalism collections; all levels. R. A. Logan emeritus, University of Missouri--Columbia
Reviews
Review Quotes
""Easy to read and including helpful footbotes and a bibliography, this book will particularly interest libraries in Florida, where Pop was an influential citizen. Recommended."--Choice" --
""Easy to read and including helpful footnotes and a bibliography, this book will particularly interest libraries in Florida, where Pope was an influential citizen. Recommended."--R.A. Logan, Choice" --
""Grounded in interviews with Pope, his associates and his employees, "The Godfather of Tabloid is the first comprehensive look at the life of this colorful character, a man who almost singlehandedly changed the world of publishing forever."--King Features Syndicate, Inc." --
"An entertaining look at this colorful and quintessentially American character.Vitek's will be the enduring study of Pope and the supermarket tabloid culture he spawned."--Dennis McDougal, author of The Last Mogul: Lew Wasserman, MCA, and the Hidden History of Hollywood
""The Godfather of Tabloid" is an engaging saga of one man's obsessive devotion to creating an entertaining alternative universe each week for four or five million Americans clutching their quarters at the supermarket check-out racks."--Edward Kosner, Wall Stret Journal Online" --
""An entertaining look at this colorful and quintessentially American character...Vitek's will be the enduring study of Pope and the supermarket tabloid culture he spawned."--Dennis McDougal, author of The Last Mogul: Lew Wasserman, MCA, and the Hidden History of Hollywood "A lively, shrewd and thoroughly compelling biography of National Enquirer publisher Generoso Pope Jr. Vitek melds journalistic flashiness with one sharp professorial insight after another into the nature of tabloid journalism and the powerful and peculiar Pope." --David Holmberg, contributor to the New York Times, regional edition" --
""The book is well worth reading. For those of us who could seldom avoid the allure of the Enquirer's shlocky headlines, this book is interesting. And Pope survived some very lean years. Struggling newspapers today might even learn a lesson or two from him."--Prudy, Taylor Board, Boca Raton News" --
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Booklist, August 2008
Wall Street Journal, August 2008
Los Angeles Times, September 2008
PW Annex Reviews, October 2008
Choice, January 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
They're hard to miss at grocery stores and newsstands in Americathe colorful, heavily illustrated tabloid newspapers with headlines promising shocking, unlikely, and sometimes impossible stories within. Although the papers are now ubiquitous, the supermarket tabloid's origin can be traced to one man: Generoso Pope Jr., an eccentric, domineering chain-smoker who died of a heart attack at age sixty-one. InThe Godfather of Tabloid,Jack Vitek explores the life and remarkable career of Pope and the founding of the most famous tabloid of all theNational Enquirer. Upon graduating from MIT, Pope worked briefly for the CIA until he purchased theNew York Enquirerwith dubious financial help from mob boss Frank Costello. Working tirelessly and cultivating a mix of American journalists (some of whom, surprisingly, were Pulitzer prize winners) and buccaneering Brits from Fleet Street who would do anything to get a story, Pope changed the name, format, and content of the modest weekly newspaper until it resembled nothing America had ever seen before. At its height, theNational Enquirerboasted a circulation of more than five million, equivalent to the numbers of the Hearst newspaper empire. Pope measured the success of his paper by the mail it received from readers, and eventually the volume of reader feedback was such that the post office assigned theEnquireroffices their own zip code. Pope was skeptical about including too much celebrity coverage in the tabloid because he thought it wouldn't hold people's interest, and he shied away from political stories or stances. He wanted the paper to reflect the middlebrow tastes of America and connect with the widest possible readership. Pope was a man of contradictions: he would fire someone for merely disagreeing with him in a meeting (once firing an one editor in the middle of his birthday party), and yet he spent upwards of a million dollars a year to bring the world's tallest Christmas tree to theEnquireroffices in Lantana, Florida, for the enjoyment of the local citizens. Driven, tyrannical, and ruthless in his pursuit of creating an empire, Pope changed the look and content of supermarket tabloid media, and the industry still bears his stamp. Grounded in interviews with many of Pope's supporters, detractors, and associates,The Godfather of Tabloidis the first comprehensive biography of the man who created a genre and changed the world of publishing forever.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this work, Jack Vitek explores the life and career of Pope and the founding of the mother of all tabloids, the 'National Enquirer'. Working with American journalists and Brits from Fleet Street, Pope changed the name, format, and content of the modest daily newspaper until it resembled nothing America had seen before.
Main Description
They're hard to miss at grocery stores and newsstands in America -- the colorful, heavily illustrated tabloid newspapers with headlines promising shocking, unlikely, and sometimes impossible stories within. Although the papers are now ubiquitous, the supermarket tabloid's origin can be traced to one man: Generoso Pope Jr., an eccentric, domineering chain-smoker who died of a heart attack at age sixty-one. In The Godfather of Tabloid, Jack Vitek explores the life and remarkable career of Pope and the founding of the most famous tabloid of all -- the National Enquirer. Upon graduating from MIT, Pope worked briefly for the CIA until he purchased the New York Enquirer with dubious financial help from mob boss Frank Costello. Working tirelessly and cultivating a mix of American journalists (some of whom, surprisingly, were Pulitzer prize winners) and buccaneering Brits from Fleet Street who would do anything to get a story, Pope changed the name, format, and content of the modest weekly newspaper until it resembled nothing America had ever seen before. At its height, the National Enquirer boasted a circulation of more than five million, equivalent to the numbers of the Hearst newspaper empire. Pope measured the success of his paper by the mail it received from readers, and eventually the volume of reader feedback was such that the post office assigned the Enquirer offices their own zip code. Pope was skeptical about including too much celebrity coverage in the tabloid because he thought it wouldn't hold people's interest, and he shied away from political stories or stances. He wanted the paper to reflect the middlebrow tastes of America and connect with the widest possible readership. Pope was a man of contradictions: he would fire someone for merely disagreeing with him in a meeting (once firing an one editor in the middle of his birthday party), and yet he spent upwards of a million dollars a year to bring the world's tallest Christmas tree to the Enquirer offices in Lantana, Florida, for the enjoyment of the local citizens. Driven, tyrannical, and ruthless in his pursuit of creating an empire, Pope changed the look and content of supermarket tabloid media, and the industry still bears his stamp. Grounded in interviews with many of Pope's supporters, detractors, and associates, The Godfather of Tabloid is the first comprehensive biography of the man who created a genre and changed the world of publishing forever.
Description for Bookstore
They're impossible to miss at grocery stores and newsstands in America: colorful, heavily illustrated tabloid newspapers with headlines promising shocking, unlikely, and sometimes impossible stories within. Although ubiquitous now, the supermarket tabloid's origin can be traced to one man: Generoso Pope Jr. (19211988), an eccentric, domineering chain-smoker who died of a heart attack at the age of sixty-one. InThe Godfather of Tabloid, Jack Vitek explores the life and career of Pope and the founding of the mother of all tabloids, theNational Enquirer. Upon graduating from MIT, Pope worked briefly for the CIA until he purchased theNew York Enquirerwith dubious financial help from mob boss Frank Costello. Working with American journalists and Brits from Fleet Street, Pope changed the name, format, and content of the modest newspaper until it resembled nothing America had seen before. Grounded in interviews with Pope and his detractors and associates,The Godfather of Tabloidis the first comprehensive look at the life of a man who created a newspaper genre and changed the world of publishing forever.

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