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America and the Islamic bomb : the deadly compromise /
David Armstrong and Joseph Trento.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Hanover, N.H. : Steerforth Press, c2007.
description
292 p.
ISBN
1586421379 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9781586421373 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Hanover, N.H. : Steerforth Press, c2007.
isbn
1586421379 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9781586421373 (hbk. : alk. paper)
general note
"A project of the National Security News Service."
catalogue key
6620360
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
From the Introduction Over the past three decades, official investigations in the United States and Europe came close on several occasions to pulling the lid off of Pakistan's nuclear smuggling network. But to protect strategic relationships with Islamabad, those inquiries were scuttled by intervention at the highest levels of government. The opportunities to roll up the network were lost and the spread of nuclear technology continued. Suggestions by President George W. Bush and members of his administration that the Khan case is a success story would be laughable if the implications were not so dire. Many of the Khan network's operatives remain free and live openly in Europe, Asia, and even the United States. The underground trade in nuclear technology continues, and the opportunities for terrorists to get their hands on atomic weaponry are expanding. Many in Pakistan's military, intelligence, and scientific communities are closely allied with the Taliban and al Qaeda, groups that US policy in the years before 9/11 helped foster. The lure of profits, combined with ideological, religious, and ethnic loyalties creates conditions for potentially deadly cooperation between those with access to nuclear technology and our bitterest enemies.
First Chapter
From the Introduction
Over the past three decades, official investigations in the United States and Europe came close on several occasions to pulling the lid off of Pakistan’s nuclear smuggling network. But to protect strategic relationships with Islamabad, those inquiries were scuttled by intervention at the highest levels of government. The opportunities to roll up the network were lost and the spread of nuclear technology continued.
Suggestions by President George W. Bush and members of his administration that the Khan case is a success story would be laughable if the implications were not so dire. Many of the Khan network’s operatives remain free and live openly in Europe, Asia, and even the United States. The underground trade in nuclear technology continues, and the opportunities for terrorists to get their hands on atomic weaponry are expanding. Many in Pakistan’s military, intelligence, and scientific communities are closely allied with the Taliban and al Qaeda, groups that US policy in the years before 9/11 helped foster. The lure of profits, combined with ideological, religious, and ethnic loyalties creates conditions for potentially deadly cooperation between those with access to nuclear technology and our bitterest enemies.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Learn more at www.islamicbomb.org "Armstrong and Trento argue convincingly that Pakistan's leaking and selling of atomic secrets across the region have increased nuclear proliferation by 'small, weak states' and the likelihood of 'terrorists or unfriendly regimes getting their hands on an atomic device.' The United States 'aided and abettted' this exchange by remaining allied to Pakistan, which harbored one of the worst culprits, A.Q. Khan, leader of a nuclear smuggling ring, and by not taking a stronger stance against nuclear proliferation. . . . Written by experienced journalists . . . combines research with a journalistic flair. . . . and invites a wide readership from a lay audience." - Library Journal
"Provide[s] essential information for understanding the nuclear dangers posed by Pakistan."The New York Review of Books "A chilling account of the political calculus that led five successive US presidents to turn a blind eye" to Pakistan's nuclear smuggling. The Christian Science Monitor "This chilling expose chronicles American foreign policy in relation to nuclear weapons development worldwide, and particularly in Pakistan. Beginning with Truman's Atomic Energy Act of 1946 and ending with George W. Bush's hunt for nonexistent WMDs in Iraq, the history is as interesting as it is infuriating. Operating under Cold War paranoia in the 1960s and '70s, the U.S. saw Pakisatn as a conveniently located ally and so, in addition to providing hundreds of millions of dollars in military aid, helped jumpstart the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, which gave the country its nuclear capabilities. What followed was decades of mismanagement, culminating in the revelation that Pakistani national hero A.Q. Khan was deeply involved in the nuclear black market; the authors contend that the U.S. government knew all about Khan's negotiations with Libya, Iran and North Korea, but ignored it to keep Pakistan an ally, first against the Communists and now in the 'War on Terror.' This accessible history should raise awareness of the many devil's bargains that the U.S. has struck in the seemingly vain hope of keeping control over perhaps the greatest man-made threat to humanity." Publishers Weekly Learn more atwww.islamicbomb.org "Armstrong and Trento argue convincingly that Pakistan's leaking and selling of atomic secrets across the region have increased nuclear proliferation by 'small, weak states' and the likelihood of 'terrorists or unfriendly regimes getting their hands on an atomic device.' The United States 'aided and abettted' this exchange by remaining allied to Pakistan, which harbored one of the worst culprits, A.Q. Khan, leader of a nuclear smuggling ring, and by not taking a stronger stance against nuclear proliferation. . . . Written by experienced journalists . . . combines research with a journalistic flair. . . . and invites a wide readership from a lay audience." Library Journal " . . . a ground-level look at the operational failures of U.S., British and other intelligence services in assessing the Khan network. . . . David Armstrong and Joseph Trento reveal multiple scuttled investigations and chronicle the infighting within several U.S. administrations, beginning under Reagan in the 1980s, over what to do about Khan and, more broadly, Pakistan, whose cooperation was deemed vital in fighting the Soviets in Afghanistan. Rivetingly, Armstrong and Trento also recount the deals that Khan made . . . to supply uranium centrifuges to several countries. And they tell the story of . . . a successful British effort to uproot the tentacles of Khan's illicit purchasing network from Malaysia to Spain and France." Washington Post Book World
"Provide[s] essential information for understanding the nuclear dangers posed by Pakistan." The New York Review of Books "A chilling account of the political calculus that led five successive US presidents to turn a blind eye" to Pakistan's nuclear smuggling. The Christian Science Monitor "This chilling expose chronicles American foreign policy in relation to nuclear weapons development worldwide, and particularly in Pakistan. Beginning with Truman's Atomic Energy Act of 1946 and ending with George W. Bush's hunt for nonexistent WMDs in Iraq, the history is as interesting as it is infuriating. Operating under Cold War paranoia in the 1960s and '70s, the U.S. saw Pakisatn as a conveniently located ally and so, in addition to providing hundreds of millions of dollars in military aid, helped jumpstart the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, which gave the country its nuclear capabilities. What followed was decades of mismanagement, culminating in the revelation that Pakistani national hero A.Q. Khan was deeply involved in the nuclear black market; the authors contend that the U.S. government knew all about Khan's negotiations with Libya, Iran and North Korea, but ignored it to keep Pakistan an ally, first against the Communists and now in the 'War on Terror.' This accessible history should raise awareness of the many devil's bargains that the U.S. has struck in the seemingly vain hope of keeping control over perhaps the greatest man-made threat to humanity." Publishers Weekly Learn more at www.islamicbomb.org "Armstrong and Trento argue convincingly that Pakistan's leaking and selling of atomic secrets across the region have increased nuclear proliferation by 'small, weak states' and the likelihood of 'terrorists or unfriendly regimes getting their hands on an atomic device.' The United States 'aided and abettted' this exchange by remaining allied to Pakistan, which harbored one of the worst culprits, A.Q. Khan, leader of a nuclear smuggling ring, and by not taking a stronger stance against nuclear proliferation. . . . Written by experienced journalists . . . combines research with a journalistic flair. . . . and invites a wide readership from a lay audience." Library Journal " . . . a ground-level look at the operational failures of U.S., British and other intelligence services in assessing the Khan network. . . . David Armstrong and Joseph Trento reveal multiple scuttled investigations and chronicle the infighting within several U.S. administrations, beginning under Reagan in the 1980s, over what to do about Khan and, more broadly, Pakistan, whose cooperation was deemed vital in fighting the Soviets in Afghanistan. Rivetingly, Armstrong and Trento also recount the deals that Khan made . . . to supply uranium centrifuges to several countries. And they tell the story of . . . a successful British effort to uproot the tentacles of Khan's illicit purchasing network from Malaysia to Spain and France." Washington Post Book World
"This chilling expose chronicles American foreign policy in relation to nuclear weapons development worldwide, and particularly in Pakistan. Beginning with Truman's Atomic Energy Act of 1946 and ending with George W. Bush's hunt for nonexistent WMDs in Iraq, the history is as interesting as it is infuriating. Operating under Cold War paranoia in the 1960s and '70s, the U.S. saw Pakisatn as a conveniently located ally and so, in addition to providing hundreds of millions of dollars in military aid, helped jumpstart the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, which gave the country its nuclear capabilities. What followed was decades of mismanagement, culminating in the revelation that Pakistani national hero A.Q. Khan was deeply involved in the nuclear black market; the authors contend that the U.S. government knew all about Khan's negotiations with Libya, Iran and North Korea, but ignored it to keep Pakistan an ally, first against the Communists and now in the 'War on Terror.' This accessible history should raise awareness of the many devil's bargains that the U.S. has struck in the seemingly vain hope of keeping control over perhaps the greatest man-made threat to humanity." - Publishers Weekly Learn more atwww.islamicbomb.org "Armstrong and Trento argue convincingly that Pakistan's leaking and selling of atomic secrets across the region have increased nuclear proliferation by 'small, weak states' and the likelihood of 'terrorists or unfriendly regimes getting their hands on an atomic device.' The United States 'aided and abettted' this exchange by remaining allied to Pakistan, which harbored one of the worst culprits, A.Q. Khan, leader of a nuclear smuggling ring, and by not taking a stronger stance against nuclear proliferation. . . . Written by experienced journalists . . . combines research with a journalistic flair. . . . and invites a wide readership from a lay audience." - Library Journal
This item was reviewed in:
PW Annex Reviews, October 2007
Washington Post, November 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
The turbulent nation of Pakistan, where Osama bin Laden is far more popular than George W. Bush, possesses a nuclear arsenal built with technology from the United States and Europe, and financed with the help of America's allies in the Muslim world. Its dictatorial president, Pervez Musharraf, faces widespread civil opposition, and militant extremists threaten his life every day. The nuclear weapons programs in North Korea and Iran, as well as Libya's now-defunct atomic effort, relied heavily on expertise and materials provided by the nuclear smuggling network headed by Pakistan's national hero, A.Q. Khan. The United States - from Carter and Reagan, through Bush I, Clinton, and the current president - and other Western governments knew all along that Pakistan was first developing and then exporting nuclear technology, yet consistently turned a blind eye in order to gain Pakistan's cooperation during the Cold War and, more recently, in the war on terror. As a result of this Faustian bargain, nuclear technology has been allowed to spread far and wide, dramatically increasing the chances that terrorists or unfriendly regimes will someday get their hands on an atomic device. David Armstrong and Joseph Trento provide a new and unrivalled perspective on the so-called A.Q. Khan nuclear black market scandal, including exclusive accounts from customs agents, intelligence analysts, and other ground-level front-line operatives. Documented in these pages are maddening experiences of official interference and breathtaking instances of indifference and incompetence. Trento and Armstrong name names and reveal stunning new information about proliferators in an expose that is sure to generateheadlines. This secret history of how the Islamic bomb was developed and how nuclear arms have proliferated is as fascinating as it is disturbing.
Main Description
David Armstrong and Joseph Trento provide a new and unrivaled perspective on the so-called A.Q. Khan nuclear black market scandal, including exclusive accounts from customs agents, intelligence analysts, and other ground-level, front-line operatives. Documented in these pages are maddening experiences of official interference and breathtaking instances of indifference and incompetence. Trento and Armstrong name names and reveal stunning new information about proliferators in an expose that is sure to generate headlines. This secret history of how the Islamic bomb was developed and how nuclear arms have proliferated is as fascinating as it is disturbing. Over the past three decades, official investigations in the United States and Europe came close on several occasions to pulling the lid off Pakistan's nuclear smuggling network. But to protect strategic relationships with Islamabad, those inquiries were scuttled by intervention at the highest levels of government. The opportunities to roll up the network were lost and the spread of nuclear technology continued. Suggestions by President George W. Bush and members of his administration that the Khan case is a success story would be laughable if the implications were not so dire. Many of the Khan network's operatives remain free and live openly in Europe, Asia, and even the United States. The underground trade in nuclear technology continues, and the opportunities for terrorists to get their hands on atomic weaponry are expanding. Many in Pakistan's military, intelligence, and scientific communities are closely allied with the Taliban and al Qaeda, groups that US policy in the years before 9/11 helped foster. The lure of profits, combined with ideological, religious, and ethnic loyalties creates conditions for potentially deadly cooperation between those with access to nuclear technology and our bitterest enemies. Book jacket.
Main Description
The Carter and Reagan administrations set aside concerns about the spread of nuclear weapons in order to win Pakistan's assistance in a covert war against the Soviet Union, a policy that snowballed as the United States continued to turn a blind eye to Pakistani nuclear trafficking after 9/11, and has seriously compromised both U.S. and world security. Drawing on exclusive interviews, classified records, and secret government reports, America and the Islamic Bomb provides an entirely new perspective on the so-called A.Q. Khan nuclear black market scandal. It explodes the myth of Khan as a rogue scientist operating beyond the control of Pakistani officials and demonstrates that the U.S. and other Western governments repeatedly scuttled investigations that could have halted Khan's deadly nuclear trade years ago. The West knowingly allowed the transfer of sophisticated nuclear technology to some of the world's most dangerous regimes, fundamentally altering the global nuclear calculus, making it far easier for small, weak states to develop a nuclear capability, and dramatically increasing the prospects of terrorists getting their hands on an atomic device.
Main Description
The Carter and Reagan administrations set aside concerns about the spread of nuclear weapons in order to win Pakistan's assistance in a covert war against the Soviet Union, a policy that snowballed as the U.S. continued to turn a blind eye to Pakistani nuclear trafficking after 9/11, and has seriously compromised both U.S. and world security. Drawing on exclusive interviews, classified records, and secret government records, and secret government reports, this book provides an entirely new persepctive on the so-called A.Q. Khan nuclear black market scandal.
Main Description
The turbulent nation of Pakistan, where Osama bin Laden is far more popular than George W. Bush, possesses a nuclear arsenal built with technology from the United States and Europe, and financed with the help of America's allies in the Muslim world. Its dictatorial president, Pervez Musharraf, faces widespread civil opposition, and militant extremists threaten his life every day. The nuclear weapons programs in North Korea and Iran, as well as Libya's now-defunct atomic effort, relied heavily on expertise and materials provided by the nuclear smuggling network headed by Pakistan's national hero, A.Q. Khan. The United States from Carter and Reagan, through Bush I, Clinton, and the current president and other Western governments knew all along that Pakistan was first developing and then exporting nuclear technology, yet consistently turned a blind eye in order to gain Pakistan's cooperation during the Cold War and, more recently, in the war on terror. As a result of this Faustian bargain, nuclear technology has been allowed to spread far and wide, dramatically increasing the chances that terrorists or unfriendly regimes will someday get their hands on an atomic device. David Armstrong and Joseph Trento provide a new and unrivalled perspective on the so-called A.Q. Khan nuclear black market scandal, including exclusive accounts from customs agents, intelligence analysts, and other ground-level front-line operatives. Documented in these pages are maddening experiences of official interference and breathtaking instances of indifference and incompetence. Trento and Armstrong name names and reveal stunning new information about proliferators in an expose that is sure to generate headlines. This secret history of how the Islamic bomb was developed and how nuclear arms have proliferated is as fascinating as it is disturbing.
Main Description
The turbulent nation of Pakistan, where Osama bin Laden is far more popular than George W. Bush, possesses a nuclear arsenal built with technology from the United States and Europe, and financed with the help of America's allies in the Muslim world. Its dictatorial president, Pervez Musharraf, faces widespread civil opposition, and militant extremists threaten his life every day. The nuclear weapons programs in North Korea and Iran, as well as Libya's now-defunct atomic effort, relied heavily on expertise and materials provided by the nuclear smuggling network headed by Pakistan's national hero, A.Q. Khan. The United States - from Carter and Reagan, through Bush I, Clinton, and the current president - and other Western governments knew all along that Pakistan was first developing and then exporting nuclear technology, yet consistently turned a blind eye in order to gain Pakistan's cooperation during the Cold War and, more recently, in the war on terror. As a result of this Faustian bargain, nuclear technology has been allowed to spread far and wide, dramatically increasing the chances that terrorists or unfriendly regimes will someday get their hands on an atomic device. David Armstrong and Joseph Trento provide a new and unrivalled perspective on the so-called A.Q. Khan nuclear black market scandal, including exclusive accounts from customs agents, intelligence analysts, and other ground-level front-line operatives. Documented in these pages are maddening experiences of official interference and breathtaking instances of indifference and incompetence. Trento and Armstrong name names and reveal stunning new information about proliferators in an exposé that is sure to generate headlines. This secret history of how the Islamic bomb was developed and how nuclear arms have proliferated is as fascinating as it is disturbing.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Nuclear Politicsp. 5
Nuclear Relationsp. 20
The Age of Proliferationp. 39
Gearing Upp. 56
The Compromisep. 74
Help from the Westp. 98
Aiding and Abettingp. 116
A Turn of the Screwp. 138
Bombs 'R' Usp. 155
End Gamep. 196
Epiloguep. 218
Notesp. 231
Acknowledgmentsp. 269
Creditsp. 271
Indexp. 273
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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