Catalogue


Bear in mind these dead /
Susan McKay.
imprint
London : Faber and Faber, 2008.
description
412 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0571236960 (pbk.), 9780571236961 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London : Faber and Faber, 2008.
isbn
0571236960 (pbk.)
9780571236961 (pbk.)
catalogue key
6601396
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 403-412).
A Look Inside
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
In 2007 Sinn F_in and the Democratic Unionist Party sat down together to share power in a new Northern Ireland Assembly. Old enemies have at last agreed to move on from the hatred and violence of the past four decades.The Troubles have ended, but many of those who suffered still have no peace of mind. Nearly 4,000 people were killed during the conflict. A legacy of hurt remains: of suicides and broken hearts, and injuries to mind and body that have not healed. The question of who speaks for the dead remains contentious. One person’s hero is another’s murderer. Some victims say others have no right to that title. Dealing with the past is controversial in the new Northern Ireland.Susan McKay’s book explores the difficult aftermath of the violence for families, friends and communities. By interviewing those who loved the missing and the dead, as well as some who narrowly survived, McKay gives a voice to those who are too often overlooked in the political histories. She has found grief and rage, as well as forgiveness. Some long to forget, others cannot rest until they find out the truth. Some demand a measure of justice. They face formidable odds, for there are those with strong interests in keeping parts of the history of the Troubles in the dark.The devolved government in Northern Ireland is working towards a new future for all the people. This book is a moving and important contribution to that process. Only by confronting the brutality of the past can there be any hope that the dead may finally be laid to rest.
Main Description
Nearly 4,000 people were killed over the thirty or so years of the Northern Irish Troubles. And the killings were as intimate as they were brutal. Neighbours murdered neighbours. Susan McKay’s book explores the difficult legacy of this conflict for families, friends and communities. By interviewing those who loved the missing and the dead, as well as some who narrowly survived, McKay gives a voice to those who are too often overlooked in the political histories. Old enemies are now in government together in Belfast, and the killing has all but stopped, but peace can only endure if the dead can finally be laid to rest. Bear in Mind These Dead is a moving and important contribution to that process.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The Northern Irish Troubles had roots, in the words of the poet John Hewitt, 'crazily tangled as the Book of Kells'. Susan McKay's book explores the difficult legacy of the conflict for families, friends and communities.
Main Description
Nearly 4,000 people were killed over the thirty or so years of the Northern Irish Troubles. And the killings were as intimate as they were brutal. Neighbours murdered neighbours. Susan McKay_s book explores the difficult legacy of this conflict for families, friends and communities. By interviewing those who loved the missing and the dead, as well as some who narrowly survived, McKay gives a voice to those who are too often overlooked in the political histories. Old enemies are now in government together in Belfast, and the killing has all but stopped, but peace can only endure if the dead can finally be laid to rest. Bear in Mind These Dead is a moving and important contribution to that process.
Back Cover Copy
In 2007 Sinn F_in and the Democratic Unionist Party sat down together to share power in a new Northern Ireland Assembly. Old enemies have at last agreed to move on from the hatred and violence of the past four decades.The Troubles have ended, but many of those who suffered still have no peace of mind. Nearly 4,000 people were killed during the conflict. A legacy of hurt remains: of suicides and broken hearts, and injuries to mind and body that have not healed. The question of who speaks for the dead remains contentious. One person_s hero is another_s murderer. Some victims say others have no right to that title. Dealing with the past is controversial in the new Northern Ireland.Susan McKay_s book explores the difficult aftermath of the violence for families, friends and communities. By interviewing those who loved the missing and the dead, as well as some who narrowly survived, McKay gives a voice to those who are too often overlooked in the political histories. She has found grief and rage, as well as forgiveness. Some long to forget, others cannot rest until they find out the truth. Some demand a measure of justice. They face formidable odds, for there are those with strong interests in keeping parts of the history of the Troubles in the dark.The devolved government in Northern Ireland is working towards a new future for all the people. This book is a moving and important contribution to that process. Only by confronting the brutality of the past can there be any hope that the dead may finally be laid to rest.
Table of Contents
The Killing Years
Dragon's Teethp. 17
The Worst Yearp. 31
'My Youngest Son Came Home Today'p. 51
Goya by Moonlight in South Armaghp. 70
Into the Hunger Strikesp. 87
Dying for the Queenp. 104
The Mother of a Son, the Son of a Motherp. 117
The Darkness Before the Dawnp. 127
Drumcree Warriorsp. 149
After the Delugep. 164
Corrupting Another Generationp. 184
Aftermath
The Damage Donep. 203
Facing the Enemyp. 225
Hierarchies of Victimsp. 255
Law Ceased to Existp. 273
Making Peace with the Past?p. 292
Setting Memory in Stonep. 313
Broken Thingsp. 348
'The Disentanglement of Life and Death'p. 371
Glossaryp. 391
Acknowledgementsp. 401
Notesp. 403
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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