Catalogue


The apology ritual : a philosophical theory of punishment /
Christopher Bennett.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008.
description
ix, 210 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521880726 (hardback : alk. paper), 9780521880725 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008.
isbn
0521880726 (hardback : alk. paper)
9780521880725 (hardback : alk. paper)
contents note
The problem of punishment and the restorative alternative -- Some retributivist themes -- Responsibility, reactive attitudes and the right to be punished -- Non-retributive dialogue -- The cycle of blame and apology -- Restorative justice and state condemnation of crime -- Institutional blame and apology -- The apology ritual and its rivals.
catalogue key
6601376
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 199-207) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-02-01:
Bennett (U. Sheffield, UK) proposes a retributive theory of punishment that seeks to combine a proportionate condemnation of criminal wrongdoing with a restoration of relationships damaged by crime. Accordingly, he explains why his take on restorative justice moves his theory beyond the traditional retributivist view of punishment to one based on the practice of apology. The conventional view of retributivism is that offenders deserve to be punished, and that said penalty alone presumably annuls the crime. Bennett claims his view builds on the philosophies of Kant and Hegel, who refer to "punishment as the wrongdoers right as a moral agent." He underscores the "right to be punished" strategy because it identifies a crucial facet of a responsible moral agent's identity as such in a normative context of criminal justice. Despite Bennett's fuller treatment of the Kantian legacy, this reviewer would have preferred a similar exposition of Hegel's view to better grasp the latter's strange locution in asserting that an offender has the "right to be punished" instead of that (s)he "deserves to be punished." Bennett does offer a relatively clear view of key conditions in which retributive punishment is justified and what justifies it with respect to responsible moral agency. Good bibliography and index. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-level undergraduates and above; general readers. A. S. Rosenbaum Cleveland State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2009
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Christopher Bennett presents a theory of punishment grounded in the practice of apology, and in particular in reactions such as feeling sorry and making amends. His book is a rich and intriguing contribution to the debate over punishment and restorative justice.
Description for Bookstore
Christopher Bennett presents a theory of punishment grounded in the practice of apology, and in particular in reactions such as feeling sorry and making amends. His book is a rich and original contribution to the debate over punishment and restorative justice.
Main Description
Christopher Bennett presents a theory of punishment grounded in the practice of apology, and in particular in reactions such as feeling sorry and making amends. He argues that offenders have a 'right to be punished' - that it is part of taking an offender seriously as a member of a normatively demanding relationship (such as friendship or collegiality or citizenship) that she is subject to retributive attitudes when she violates the demands of that relationship. However, while he claims that punishment and the retributive attitudes are the necessary expression of moral condemnation, his account of these reactions has more in common with restorative justice than traditional retributivism. He argues that the most appropriate way to react to crime is to require the offender to make proportionate amends. His book is a rich and original contribution to the debate over punishment and restorative justice.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Christopher Bennett presents a theory of punishment grounded in the practice of apology, and in particular in reactions such as feeling sorry and making amends. He argues that offenders have a 'right to be punished' - that it is part of taking an offender seriously as a member of a normatively demanding relationship.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. viii
Introductionp. 1
Justifying Punishmentp. 11
The problem of punishment and the restorative alternativep. 13
Some retributivist themesp. 26
Responding to Wrongdoingp. 45
Responsibility, reactive attitudes and the right to be punishedp. 47
Non-retributive dialoguep. 74
The cycle of blame and apologyp. 101
The Apology Ritualp. 123
Restorative justice and state condemnation of crimep. 125
Institutional blame and apologyp. 152
The Apology Ritual and its rivalsp. 175
Bibliographyp. 199
Indexp. 208
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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