Catalogue


Reinventing collapse : the Soviet example and American prospects /
Dmitry Orlov.
imprint
Gabriola Island, B.C. : New Society Publishers, 2008.
description
x, 165 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0865716064, 9780865716063
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Gabriola Island, B.C. : New Society Publishers, 2008.
isbn
0865716064
9780865716063
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
6559969
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Summaries
Main Description
The title of this book is Reinventing Collapse , and I have to say that's exactly what this book manages to do. It's a short book, so you could reqad it in just a few hours, but it is packed with information and "make you think" moments. Orlov's unique perpsective on American life engages the reader and opens your eyes to what life in America is like to an outsider. Without a doubt the most useful aspect of this book are the details of what the situation was like in Russia after their political collapse. This book is a tutorial on how the reader might modify thier life in the future if (or when) America collapses. Reviewed by Matt Mayer - Groovy Green In the waning days of the American empire, we find ourselves mired in political crisis, with our foreign policy coming under sharp criticism and our economy in steep decline. These trends mirror the experience of the Soviet Union in the early 1980s. Reinventing Collapse examines the circumstances of the demise of the Soviet superpower and offers clear insights into how we might prepare for coming events. Rather than focusing on doom and gloom, Reinventing Collapse suggests that there is room for optimism if we focus our efforts on personal and cultural transformation. With characteristic dry humor, Dmitry Orlov identifies three progressive stages of response to the looming crisis: Mitigation-alleviating the impact of the coming upheaval Adaptation-adjusting to the reality of changed conditions Opportunity-flourishing after the collapse He argues that by examining maladaptive parts of our common cultural baggage, we can survive, thrive, and discover more meaningful and fulfilling lives, in spite of steadily deteriorating circumstances. This challenging yet inspiring work is a must-read for anyone concerned about energy, geopolitics, international relations, and life in a post-Peak Oil world. Dmitry Orlov was born in Leningrad and immigrated to the United States at the age of twelve. He was an eyewitness to the Soviet collapse over several extended visits to his Russian homeland between the late eighties and mid-nineties. He is an engineer and a leading Peak Oil theorist whose writing is featured on such sites as www.lifeaftertheoilcrash.net and www.powerswitch.org.uk.
Main Description
During the Soviet Union's collapse in the late 1980s and early 1990s, Dmitry Orlov went to see for himself the various stages of the disintegration of a superpower. What he saw was shocking and often surprising, as an empire ceased to exist and a society was forced to reorganize itself from top to bottom.
Long Description
In the waning days of the American empire, we find ourselves mired in political crisis, with our foreign policy coming under sharp criticism and our economy in steep decline. These trends mirror the experience of the Soviet Union in the early 1980s. Reinventing Collapse examines the circumstances of the demise of the Soviet superpower and offers clear insights into how we might prepare for coming events. Rather than focusing on doom and gloom, "Reinventing Collapse" suggests that there is room for optimism if we focus our efforts on personal and cultural transformation. With characteristic dry humor, Dmitry Orlov identifies three progressive stages of response to the looming crisis: Mitigation-alleviating the impact of the coming upheavalAdaptation-adjusting to the reality of changed conditionsOpportunity-flourishing after the collapse He argues that by examining maladaptive parts of our common cultural baggage, we can survive, thrive, and discover more meaningful and fulfilling lives, in spite of steadily deteriorating circumstances. This challenging yet inspiring work is a must-read for anyone concerned about energy, geopolitics, international relations, and life in a post-Peak Oil world. Dmitry Orlov was born in Leningrad and immigrated to the United States at the age of twelve. He was an eyewitness to the Soviet collapse over several extended visits to his Russian homeland between the late eighties and mid-nineties. He is an engineer and a leading Peak Oil theorist whose writing is featured on such sites as www.lifeaftertheoilcrash.net and www.powerswitch.org.uk.
Description for Reader
In the waning days of the American Empire the US administration finds itself mired in political crisis; foreign policy has come under sharp criticism; and the economy is in steep decline. These trends mirror the experience of the Soviet Union in the early 1980's. Reinventing Collapse examines the circumstances of the demise of the Soviet superpower and offers clear insights into how we might prepare for coming events. Rather than focusing on doom and gloom, Reinventing Collapse suggests that there is room for optimism if we focus our efforts on personal and cultural transformation. With characteristic dry humor, Orlov identifies three progressive stages of response to the looming crisis: Mitigation – alleviating the impact of the coming upheaval Adaptation – adjusting to the reality of changed conditions Opportunity – flourishing after the collapse He argues that by examining maladaptive parts of our common cultural baggage we can survive and thrive and discover more meaningful and fulfilling lives, in spite of steadily deteriorating circumstances. This challenging yet inspiring work is a must-read for anyone concerned about energy, geopolitics, international relations and life in a post-Peak Oil world.
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Reinventing Collapse' examines the circumstances of the demise of the Soviet superpower and offers clear insights into how we might prepare for coming events. Rather than focusing on doom and gloom, the text suggests that there is room for optimism if we focus our efforts on personal and cultural transformation.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. vii
The Soviet Examplep. 1
The Collapse of the Soviet Union: An Overviewp. 7
My Return to Russiap. 9
My Premisep. 15
Superpower Similaritiesp. 19
The Myth of Inclusivenessp. 23
Technological Progressp. 25
The Cost of Technological Progressp. 33
Militarismp. 35
World's Jailersp. 42
Evil Empiresp. 47
Bankruptcyp. 49
Collapse of Legitimacyp. 52
The Collapse Gapp. 59
Collapses in Generalp. 60
Housingp. 62
Transportationp. 66
Employmentp. 69
Familiesp. 73
Moneyp. 76
Consumerismp. 79
Foodp. 82
Medicinep. 89
Educationp. 93
Ethnicityp. 98
Religionp. 100
Energyp. 101
Inevitable Conclusionp. 105
Collapse Mitigationp. 107
Reasonable Expectationsp. 110
Political Solutionsp. 113
Private Sector Solutionsp. 115
Activism and Apathyp. 116
Boondoggles to the Rescue!p. 118
Investment Advicep. 120
Do It Yourselfp. 122
Adaptationp. 125
Loss of "Normalcy"p. 126
Smelling the Rosesp. 128
Comforts and Necessitiesp. 130
Surviving Radical Cashectomyp. 132
The Revised Playbookp. 134
Lowering Your Standardsp. 135
Playing the Partp. 137
The Settled and the Nomadicp. 139
Career Opportunitiesp. 143
Asset Strippingp. 144
Drugs and Alcoholp. 146
Providing Securityp. 147
Serving Your Countryp. 149
Alternative Medicinep. 151
Alternative Transportationp. 152
Social Work in the Homep. 154
In Conclusionp. 159
Indexp. 161
About the Authorp. 165
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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