Catalogue


England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales : the Christian Church, 1900-2000 /
Keith Robbins.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.
description
x, 508 p. : maps.
ISBN
9780198263715
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.
isbn
9780198263715
catalogue key
6535653
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
Any history of the church in 20th century Britain and Ireland is bound to tell the story of decline but, as this absorbing narrative makes clear, this does not mean the church ceased to be important or that its story is lacking in interest... Robbins is able to write with real insight about the history of the churches in all the countries he covers. He is sympathetic but perceptive... Robbins does not only cover the public and insitutional life of the church, he also shows a graspof theological developments.
Any history of the church in 20th century Britian and Ireland is bound to tell the story of decline but, as this absorbing narrative makes clear, this does not mean the church ceased to be an important or that its story is lacking in interest... Robbins himself is able to write with real insight about the history of the churches in all the countries he covers. He is sympathetic but perceptive
a rich, wise and lively analysis. It is immensely learned in denominational, religious, Scottish, Welsh, Irish and English histories and biographies, making the footnotes alone a fertile scholarly quarry where even specialists will find unsuspected items.
Kieth Robbins has previously written chiefly on secular topics. He therefore takes a lay view of the history of the church which is refreshing in its objectivity... a history to be read reflectively and to be savoured slowly... The allusions are engaging and at times unusual; the references are voluminous but not intrusive. Professor Robbins has it seems read and digested everything which has been written, secular and sacred.
lively and engaging ... a worthy addition to the serires of which it is a part. Those who teach religion or the Church in history at university, college, or seminary will find it indispensible.
Professor Robins skilfully manages the challenging task of writing a history of the Christian Church in a century of dramatic change, but with significant continuities ... This can be commended as a valuable, insightful surveyof the twentieth century.
This new volume in the Oxford History of the Christian Church deserves prolonged applause
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is an examination of all branches of the Christian Church in England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales in the 20th century in their central interaction with politics, social issues, war, and culture. It considers their pursuit of an elusive unity throughout a century when prevailing cultural attitudes underwent massive change.
Main Description
Keith Robbins, building on his previous writing on the modern history of the interlocking but distinctive territories of the British Isles, takes a wide-ranging, innovative and challenging look at the twentieth-century history of the main bodies, at once national and universal, which have collectively constituted the Christian Church. The protracted search for elusive unity is emphasized. Particular beliefs, attitudes, policies and structures are located in their social and cultural contexts. Prominent individuals, clerical and lay, are scrutinized. Religion and politics intermingle, highlighting, for churches and states, fundamental questions of identity and allegiance, of public and private values, in a century of ideological conflict, violent confrontation (in Ireland), two world wars, and protracted Cold War. The massive change experienced by the countries and people of the Isles since 1900 has encompassed shifting relationships between England, Ireland (and Northern Ireland), Scotland, and Wales, the end of the British Empire, the emergence of a new Europe and, latterly, major immigration of adherents of Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism, and other faiths from outside Europe: developments scarcely conceivable at the outset. Such a broad contextual perspective provides an essential background to understanding the puzzling ambiguities evident both in secularization and enduring Christian faith. Robbins provides a cogent and compelling overview of this turbulent century for the churches of the Isles.
Main Description
Keith Robbins, building on his previous writing on the modern history of the interlocking but distinctive territories of the British Isles, takes a wide-ranging, innovative and challenging look at the twentieth-century history of the main bodies, at once national and universal, which have collectively constituted the Christian Church. The protracted search for elusive unity is emphasized. Particular beliefs, attitudes, policies and structures are located in their social and cultural contexts. Prominent individuals, clerical and lay, are scrutinized. Religion and politics intermingle, highlighting, for churches and states, fundamental questions of identity and allegiance, of public and private values, in a century of ideological conflict, violent confrontation (in Ireland), two world wars and protracted Cold War. The massive change experienced by the countries and people of the Isles since 1900 has encompassed shifting relationships between England, Ireland (and Northern Ireland), Scotland and Wales, the end of the British Empire, the emergence of a new Europe and, latterly, major immigration of adherents of Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism and other faiths from outside Europe: developments scarcely conceivable at the outset. Such a broad contextual perspective provides an essential background to understanding the puzzling ambiguities evident both in secularization and enduring Christian faith. Robbins provides a cogent and compelling overview of this turbulent century for the churches of the Isles.
Main Description
Keith Robbins, building on his previous writing on the modern history of the interlocking but distinctive territories of the British Isles, takes a wide-ranging, innovative and challenging look at the twentieth-century history of the main bodies, at once national and universal, which havecollectively constituted the Christian Church. The protracted search for elusive unity is emphasized. Particular beliefs, attitudes, policies and structures are located in their social and cultural contexts. Prominent individuals, clerical and lay, are scrutinized. Religion and politicsintermingle, highlighting, for churches and states, fundamental questions of identity and allegiance, of public and private values, in a century of ideological conflict, violent confrontation (in Ireland), two world wars and protracted Cold War.The massive change experienced by the countries and people of the Isles since 1900 has encompassed shifting relationships between England, Ireland (and Northern Ireland), Scotland and Wales, the end of the British Empire, the emergence of a new Europe and, latterly, major immigration of adherents ofIslam, Hinduism, Sikhism and other faiths from outside Europe: developments scarcely conceivable at the outset. Such a broad contextual perspective provides an essential background to understanding the puzzling ambiguities evident both in secularization and enduring Christian faith. Robbinsprovides a cogent and compelling overview of this turbulent century for the churches of the Isles.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xi
List of Mapsp. xiii
New Century, Old Faithp. 1
Structuresp. 5
Particular Placesp. 22
Sight and Soundp. 27
Time Past and Time Presentp. 32
Public Spacep. 35
A Crisis of Christendom, 1900-1914p. 47
People: Inclusions and Exclusionsp. 49
Leisure's Temptationsp. 56
Collectivism and Individualismp. 61
Education Battlesp. 65
Gender Rulesp. 69
Church Unity: Lookingp. 75
Faith: The Spirit and the Letterp. 82
Kingdom in Trouble: Churches and Nationsp. 87
Just War, 1914-1918p. 96
Imminent (Religious?) War: Irelandp. 98
War, 1914: Church and State 'Shoulder to Shoulder'p. 102
Finding the Path to Peacep. 106
Roman Catholics and the Patriotic Drump. 112
Home Frontp. 115
Foreign Servicep. 121
Women Waitingp. 124
Peace Notesp. 128
Repentance and Hope: Reviving Englandp. 131
Sacrifice and Hope: Resurrecting Irelandp. 135
Patriotism, Peace and Progressp. 144
Post-War Dislocations, 1919-1932: 'Modernity' and 'Modernism'p. 152
Managing Memoryp. 153
Broadcasting Truthp. 157
Global Politics: Self-Determination and a 'Christian' Empirep. 176
Domestic Politics: Defining Christian Citizenshipp. 180
England: Establishing Democracy and Disestablishing Church?p. 185
Wales: Disestablished and Distressedp. 189
Ireland: Divided Unitiesp. 198
Scotland: Healing Disruption, Strengthening Bordersp. 210
Church Unity: Startingp. 216
Women: Votingp. 228
'Christian Civilization' in Jeopardy, 1933-1953p. 233
Pledging Peace, Being Reasonable, Taking Sidesp. 234
Interpreting Europe's 'New Civilizations'p. 241
Protestants and Catholics: Being Internationalp. 262
Church, Community and State: British/Irish Belongingp. 269
1939-1945: Crusading Togetherp. 279
Rebuilding Exercisesp. 293
Welfare: Minds and Bodiesp. 303
Crowning Momentp. 309
The Perils of Prosperity, 1953-1975p. 320
Evangelism: Call to the Nation(s)p. 321
Relocations: Empire and Europep. 328
Churches, Nations and States: Insular Turbulencep. 340
Inside Story: Church Unity?p. 350
Texts and Contextsp. 370
Choice and Diversityp. 379
Fit for Purpose? Institutional Unsettlementp. 384
Pluralism's Puzzles, 1976-2000p. 397
Millennial Momentsp. 397
Papal Encounter: Ireland, 1979p. 405
Replacing the Past: Ireland, 2000p. 408
British Domestic Politics: Confronting Convictionsp. 422
Christian Business: John Paul II in Britainp. 427
Affectionate Friction: Struggling for Unityp. 438
Women: Accepting and Rejectingp. 441
Anglican/English Anxietiesp. 447
Insular Pluriformityp. 454
Europe: Secular and Christian?p. 464
Ambivalent Messagesp. 468
Select Bibliographyp. 476
Indexp. 481
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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