Catalogue


PD : Profoundly disturbing : shocking movies that changed history /
by Joe Bob Briggs.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Universe Pub., 2003.
description
252, [2] p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0789308444
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Universe Pub., 2003.
isbn
0789308444
catalogue key
6528183
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Joe Bob Briggs began his career as a film critic for the Dallas Times-Herald and Texas Monthly. In 1986, he started Joe Bob's Drive-In Theater, the highest-rated show on The Movie Channel, which ran for ten years. Later he created the equally popular Monstervision on TNT. The author of five books, he is currently a syndicated columnist with UPI
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2003-03-03:
Briggs, host of the long-running cable shows Joe Bob's Drive-In Theatre and Monstervision, is an acknowledged king of cult movie history. From Blood Feast to The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, Briggs analyzes 20 films and points out their cultural significance. The book is not, as the London Evening Standard put it, "beyond the bounds of depravity," but rather a wryly amusing, informative study of productions that some publicly disparage and privately relish. Roger Vadim's 1956 And God Created Woman broke down sexual barriers. His directorial shaping of Brigitte Bardot into a sex symbol, despite handicaps of coarse voice, cold manner and expressionless face, is a lusty and intriguing French version of Pygmalion. The Svengali theme also relates to Deep Throat, when Linda Lovelace, its star, became a steamy sex goddess in the hands of husband Chuck Traynor. These two movies permanently altered the way the world views celluloid sex, and Briggs demonstrates how Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch did the same for violence. Briggs touches thoughtfully on controversial interpretations that The Wild Bunch film elicited before placing it in perspective as an artistically daring forerunner of modern action films. Shaft unleashed the blaxploitation boom, while The Exorcist turned Satan into a Hollywood high concept. The author also writes with insight and affection about such lurid enterprises as The Curse of Frankenstein and The Creature from the Black Lagoon. The book merits attention from fans tired of high-minded essays about classics such as Citizen Kane, and explains why crass, tasteless pictures often make more impact than those released with the stamp of respectability. 50 illus. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, March 2003
Booklist, April 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text explains how these movies dared to tap into primal taboo subjects that the mainstream would later come to embrace and how these movies strategically eluded censors. It includes 200 rarely seen film stills and publicity shots that Joe Bob Briggs has been sent over 20 years as a reviewer.
Main Description
What the critics are saying: "Beyond the bounds of depravity!"London Evening Standard "Despicable . . . ugly and obscene . . . a degrading, senseless misuse of film and time." The Los Angeles Times "People are right to be shocked." The New Yorker From the murky depths can come the most extraordinary things. . . . Profoundly Disturbing examines the underground cult movies that haveunexpectedly and unintentionallyrevolutionized the way that all movies would be made. Called "exploitation films" because they often exploit our most primal fears and desires, these overlooked movies pioneered new cinematographic techniques, subversive narrative structuring, and guerrilla marketing strategies that would eventually trickle up into mainstream cinema. In this book Joe Bob Briggs uncovers the most seminal cult movies of the twentieth century and reveals the fascinating untold stories behind their making. Briggs is best known as the cowboy-hat wearing, Texas-drawling host of Joe Bob's Drive-in Theater and Monstervision, which ran for fourteen years on cable TV. His goofy, disarming take offers a refreshingly different perspective on movies and film making. He will make you laugh out loud but then surprise you with some truly insightful analysis. And, with more than three decades of immersion in the cult movie business, Briggs has a wealth of behind-the-scenes knowledge about the people who starred in, and made these movies. There is no one better qualified or more engaging to write about this subject. All the subgenres in cult cinema are covered, with essays centering around twenty movies including Triumph of the Will (1938), Mudhoney (1965), Night of the Living Dead (1967), Deep Throat (1973), The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974), Drunken Master (1978), and Crash (1996). Accompanying the text are dozens of capsule reviews providing ideas for related films to discover, as well as kitschy and fun archival film stills. An essential reference and guide to this overlooked side of cinema, Profoundly Disturbing should be in the home of every movie fan, especially those who think they've seen everything.
Main Description
What the critics are saying: "Beyond the bounds of depravity!"-London Evening Standard "Despicable . . . ugly and obscene . . . a degrading, senseless misuse of film and time." -The Los Angeles Times "People are right to be shocked." -The New Yorker From the murky depths can come the most extraordinary things. . . . Profoundly Disturbing examines the underground cult movies that have-unexpectedly and unintentionally-revolutionized the way that all movies would be made. Called "exploitation films" because they often exploit our most primal fears and desires, these overlooked movies pioneered new cinematographic techniques, subversive narrative structuring, and guerrilla marketing strategies that would eventually trickle up into mainstream cinema. In this book Joe Bob Briggs uncovers the most seminal cult movies of the twentieth century and reveals the fascinating untold stories behind their making. Briggs is best known as the cowboy-hat wearing, Texas-drawling host of Joe Bob's Drive-in Theater and Monstervision, which ran for fourteen years on cable TV. His goofy, disarming take offers a refreshingly different perspective on movies and film making. He will make you laugh out loud but then surprise you with some truly insightful analysis. And, with more than three decades of immersion in the cult movie business, Briggs has a wealth of behind-the-scenes knowledge about the people who starred in, and made these movies. There is no one better qualified or more engaging to write about this subject. All the subgenres in cult cinema are covered, with essays centering around twenty movies including Triumph of the Will (1938), Mudhoney (1965), Night of the Living Dead (1967), Deep Throat (1973), The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974), Drunken Master (1978), and Crash (1996). Accompanying the text are dozens of capsule reviews providing ideas for related films to discover, as well as kitschy and fun archival film stills. An essential reference and guide to this overlooked side of cinema, Profoundly Disturbing should be in the home of every movie fan, especially those who think they've seen everything.
Unpaid Annotation
Examines the cult movies that have revolutionized the way movies are made.
Unpaid Annotation
What the critics are saying: "Beyond the bounds of depravity!"-London Evening Standard"Despicable . . . ugly and obscene . . . a degrading, senseless misuse of film and time." -The Los Angeles Times"People are right to be shocked." -The New Yorker From the murky depths can come the most extraordinary things. . . . Profoundly Disturbing examines the underground cult movies that have-unexpectedly and unintentionally-revolutionized the way that all movies would be made. Called "exploitation films" because they often exploit our most primal fears and desires, these overlooked movies pioneered new cinematographic techniques, subversive narrative structuring, and guerrilla marketing strategies that would eventually trickle up into mainstream cinema. In this book Joe Bob Briggs uncovers the most seminal cult movies of the twentieth century and reveals the fascinating untold stories behind their making. Briggs is best known as the cowboy-hat wearing, Texas-drawling host of Joe Bob's Drive-in Theater and Monstervision, which ran for fourteen years on cable TV. His goofy, disarming take offers a refreshingly different perspective on movies and film making. He will make you laugh out loud but then surprise you with some truly insightful analysis. And, with more than three decades of immersion in the cult movie business, Briggs has a wealth of behind-the-scenes knowledge about the people who starred in, and made these movies. There is no one better qualified or more engaging to write about this subject. All the subgenres in cult cinema are covered, with essays centering around twenty movies including Triumph of the Will (1938), Mudhoney (1965), Night of the Living Dead(1967), Deep Throat (1973), The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974), Drunken Master (1978), and Crash (1996). Accompanying the text are dozens of capsule reviews providing ideas for related films to discover, as well as kitschy and f
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 6
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari 1919p. 10
Mom and Dad 1947p. 24
Creature from the Black Lagoon 1954p. 42
And God Created Woman 1956p. 54
The Curse of Frankenstein 1957p. 72
Blood Feast 1963p. 84
The Wild Bunch 1969p. 100
Shaft 1971p. 112
Deep Throat 1972p. 132
The Exorcist 1973p. 154
Ilsa, She-Wolf of the SS 1974p. 166
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre 1974p. 186
Drunken Master 1978p. 200
Reservoir Dogs 1992p. 214
Crash 1996p. 240
Bibliography and Indexp. 254
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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