Catalogue


Art and communication in the reign of Henry VIII /
Tatiana C. String.
imprint
Aldershot, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2008.
description
ix, 157 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0754663051 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780754663058 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2008.
isbn
0754663051 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780754663058 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction -- Henrician art and communication -- Magnificence -- Topicality -- Persuasiveness -- Propaganda -- Portraits and communication -- Visual language and illocutionary acts -- Practice -- Communication and identity -- Portraiture and masculinity -- Textual communication in Henrician portraits -- Copies and reception -- Prints and propaganda -- Art appreciation -- Conclusion.
catalogue key
6527870
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [141]-152) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Through in-depth analysis of a wide variety of works of art, including portraits, pageants, and prints, Tatiana String analyzes Henry VIII's use of art to communicate with his subjects. Looking at Henrician England as a case study, String enriches our understanding of the fundamental contribution of imagery to communication, and provides a model for the study of the dissemination of ideas and the patron-artist relationship in other courts and historical periods.
Main Description
Exploring the intersection between art and political ideology, this innovative study of art in Henrician England sheds new light on the ways in which Henry VIII and his advisers exploited visual images in order to communicate ideas to his subjects. The works analyzed include water triumphs, coronation pageants and funeral processions, printed title pages of vernacular Bibles, coins, portrait miniatures, and murals, as well as panel paintings. With her analysis of these categories of objects, and using communication theory as a starting point, String presents a new model of communication based on the concepts of magnificence, topicality, persuasiveness, and propaganda. Through this model she shows how medium, location, display, and viewership were all considered in the transmission of royal messages. Using the art of Henry VIII's reign as a case study, String enriches our understanding of the fundamental contribution of imagery to communication, and also provides a model for the study of the dissemination of ideas and the patron-artist relationship in other royal courts and historical periods
Bowker Data Service Summary
A study of an important topic in art history. The book's central premises are that the study of communication as a social process is an invaluable approach to the analysis of artistic culture and that art historical approaches to the question of communication yield significant and distinctive insights.
Long Description
Exploring the intersection between art and political ideology, this innovative study of art in Henrician England sheds new light on how Henry VIII and his advisers exploited visual images to communicate ideas to his subjects. The works analyzed -- including water triumphs, coronation pageants and funeral processions, printed title pages of vernacular Bibles, coins, portrait miniatures, and murals, as well as panel paintings -- are divided into four main groups: pageantry, portraiture, Bible title pages, and inventories of royal collections.With her analysis of these categories of objects, and using communication theory as a starting point, String presents a new model of communication based on the ideas of magnificence, topicality, persuasiveness, and propaganda. Through this model she shows how medium, location and display were all considered in the transmission of royal messages. Using the art of Henry VIII's reign as a case study, String enriches our understanding of the fundamental contribution of imagery to communication, and also provides a model for the study of the dissemination of ideas and the patron-artist relationship, in other royal courts and historical periods.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Henrician art and communication
Portraits and communication
Prints and propaganda
Art appreciation
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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