Catalogue


Marie-Thérèse, child of terror : the fate of Marie Antoinette's daughter /
Susan Nagel.
imprint
New York, NY : Bloomsbury, 2008.
description
xxix, 418 p.
ISBN
1596910577, 9781596910577
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Bloomsbury, 2008.
isbn
1596910577
9781596910577
catalogue key
6526535
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2007-12-10:
What was the fate of Marie-Therese (1778-1851) after the beheadings of her parents, King Louis XVI and Queen Marie Antoinette of France? Nagel, professor of humanities at Marymount Manhattan College (Mistress of the Elgin Marbles), relates the dramatic highs and lows experienced by the woman known as "Madame Royale." Her uncle, the Austrian emperor, wanted her to marry his brother, when she escaped from the Temple Prison at age 17 after three hellish years. Instead, she endured a loveless and childless marriage to her Bourbon cousin the Duc d'Angouleme, but became the close political ally of their uncle, Louis XVIII, whom she joined in his peripatetic exile and saw in his triumphant return to France in 1814 as king. Marie Therese survived the 1830 abdication of her father-in-law, Charles X, and died in exile. Known for her kindness and wit, she also endured persistent rumors that she was not the "real" Marie-Therese and the constant threat of abduction and assassination. Nagel's highly detailed and sympathetic account competently fills in historical gaps, but, unfortunately, is hampered by plodding prose. 16 pages of color illus; map. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2008-01-01:
This is a fascinating, readable, and engrossing book that should interest general readers and scholars alike. Nagel (comparative literature, Marymount Manhattan Coll.; Mistress of the Elgin Marbles), known for her work in unraveling historical mysteries, tells the story of Marie-Antoinette's only surviving child. The first major biography of Marie-Therese, it details her very public birth, the horrific suffering she endured in prison during the revolution, and the personal and political roles she assumed following her release in 1795. Here the story of "Madame Royale" morphs into a mysterious one, because since the 19th century rumors have abounded of an identity swap that enabled the princess to live obscurely as a reclusive "Dark Countess" in a remote German castle. Nagel attempts to solve this intriguing puzzle, using archival sources, family letters, handwriting analysis, and the latest scientific tools with DNA evidence to piece together the true fate of a woman whom she sympathetically presents as a loyal daughter of France and an honorable symbol and representative of the Bourbon line. The skillful use of maps, chronological and genealogical charts, and historical narrative provides context for readers. Highly recommended.--Marie Marmo Mullaney, Caldwell Coll., NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Gripping....providing new insights into a misunderstood and tragic figure and showing us the real human buffeted by all those historical crosscurrents."Martin Rubin,Washington Times "This is a fascinating, readable, and engrossing book that should interest general readers and scholars alike... Highly Recommended"--Library Journal, starred review "Masterly and compelling... a triumph." --Tina Brown, author ofThe Diana Chronicles "A powerful story told with wonderful verve: a triumph." Amanda Foreman, author ofGeorgiana: Duchess of Devonshire "This highly detailed, exhaustively researched, often riveting account will appeal especially to all those readers who've immersed themselves in the many recent books about Marie Antoinette." --Booklist, starred review "Taking one of those fascinating lives that have remained too long untold, Susan Nagel's Marie-Therese is a well-researched, entertaining and often poignant biography that recreates royalty, terror, tragedy, revolution, and restoration with verve and vividness."--Simon Sebag Montefiore, author ofYoung StalinandStalin: The Court of the Red Star "If there is a more fascinating or unbelievable life than the one led by Marie-Therese-Charlotte, Marie Antoinette's sole surviving child, I certainly am not familiar with it. In this lively, gripping new biography, Susan Nagel recounts Marie-Therese-Charlotte's roller-coaster itinerary from a revolutionary prison, where she spent three years of her girlhood, to the throne of Restoration France, where she reigned for a mere twenty minutes. Royal orphan and republican bete noire, the subject of fervent monarchist adoration and the object obsessive conspiracy theories, this princess emerges in Nagel's telling as one of the nineteenth century's most captivating heroines. A must-read for lovers of French history and royal biography alike."--Caroline Weber, author ofQUEEN OF FASHION: WHAT MARIE ANTOINETTE WORE TO THE REVOLUTION
"The woman in these pages emerges...as a veritable prototype of saintly Catholic forgiveness."--The Atlantic Monthly"InMarie-Therese, Child of Terror, Susan Nagel...faces the challenge of turning this largely unknown and fairly unsympathetic historical figure into a lively biographical subject....[Nagel] does capture the peculiar humanity of her subject as she evolved from princess to prisoner to decorous matron." --Valerie Styker, New York Times Book Review"Gripping....providing new insights into a misunderstood and tragic figure and showing us the real human buffeted by all those historical crosscurrents." --Martin Rubin,Washington Times"A fascinating, readable, and engrossing book that should interest general readers and scholars alike." --Library Journal,starred review"This highly detailed, exhaustively researched, often riveting account will appeal especially to all those readers who've immersed themselves in the many recent books about Marie Antoinette" --Booklist, starred review"Relates the dramatic highs and lows experienced by the woman known as "Madame Royale"....highly detailed and sympathetic." --Publishers Weekly"Enlivened by intriguing asides about the young Marie-Therese, such as the special sign language she developed to communicate with her parents in prison and the impact on her own development of her mother's bravery in the face of the French Revolution." --Kirkus Reviews"Masterly and compelling...a triumph." --Tina Brown, author of the Diana Chronicles "Few historical tales can match the family drama of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. Beheaded in 1793 during the French Revolution, they left behind a daughter, Marie-Therese, who did everything she could to help restore the Bourbons to the throne. Author Susan Nagel puts to rest most of the doubts about the Bourbons (Was Therese the legitimate daughter? Did her brother the dauphin really die in Temple Prison?) via a thorough analysis of DNA samples and handwriting in family letters. But the best part of the tale isn't the clarification of the historical record--it's the engaging portrait Nagel paints of a young woman who gave up everything for the love of France and her family." --Virtuoso Life"Taking one of those fascinating lives that have remained too long untold, Susan Nagel'sMarie-Thereseis a well-researched, entertaining and often poignant biography that recreates royalty, terror, tragedy, revolution, and restoration with verve and vividness." --Simon Sebag Montefiore, author ofYoung StalinandStalin: The Court of the Red Star
"This is a fascinating, readable, and engrossing book that should interest general readers and scholars alike... Highly Recommended"--Library Journal, starred review "Masterly and compelling... a triumph." --Tina Brown, author ofThe Diana Chronicles "A powerful story told with wonderful verve: a triumph." Amanda Foreman, author ofGeorgiana: Duchess of Devonshire "This highly detailed, exhaustively researched, often riveting account will appeal especially to all those readers who've immersed themselves in the many recent books about Marie Antoinette." --Booklist, starred review "Taking one of those fascinating lives that have remained too long untold, Susan Nagel's Marie-Therese is a well-researched, entertaining and often poignant biography that recreates royalty, terror, tragedy, revolution, and restoration with verve and vividness."--Simon Sebag Montefiore, author ofYoung StalinandStalin: The Court of the Red Star "If there is a more fascinating or unbelievable life than the one led by Marie-Therese-Charlotte, Marie Antoinette's sole surviving child, I certainly am not familiar with it. In this lively, gripping new biography, Susan Nagel recounts Marie-Therese-Charlotte's roller-coaster itinerary from a revolutionary prison, where she spent three years of her girlhood, to the throne of Restoration France, where she reigned for a mere twenty minutes. Royal orphan and republican bete noire, the subject of fervent monarchist adoration and the object obsessive conspiracy theories, this princess emerges in Nagel's telling as one of the nineteenth century's most captivating heroines. A must-read for lovers of French history and royal biography alike."--Caroline Weber, author ofQUEEN OF FASHION: WHAT MARIE ANTOINETTE WORE TO THE REVOLUTION
"Taking one of those fascinating lives that have remained too long untold, Susan Nagel's Marie-Therese is a well-researched, entertaining and often poignant biography that recreates royalty, terror, tragedy, revolution, and restoration with verve and vividness."--Simon Sebag Montefiore, author of "Young Stalin" and "Stalin: The Court of the Red Star" "If there is a more fascinating or unbelievable life than the one led by Marie-Therese-Charlotte, Marie Antoinette's sole surviving child, I certainly am not familiar with it. In this lively, gripping new biography, Susan Nagel recounts Marie-Therese-Charlotte's roller-coaster itinerary from a revolutionary prison, where she spent three years of her girlhood, to the throne of Restoration France, where she reigned for a mere twenty minutes. Royal orphan and republican bete noire, the subject of fervent monarchist adoration and the object obsessive conspiracy theories, this princess emerges in Nagel's telling as one of the nineteenth century's most captivating heroines. A must-read for lovers of French history and royal biography alike."--Caroline Weber, author of "QUEEN OF FASHION: WHAT MARIE ANTOINETTE WORE TO THE REVOLUTION"
"The woman in these pages emerges...as a veritable prototype of saintly Catholic forgiveness." The Atlantic Monthly "In Marie-Therese, Child of Terror, Susan Nagel...faces the challenge of turning this largely unknown and fairly unsympathetic historical figure into a lively biographical subject....[Nagel] does capture the peculiar humanity of her subject as she evolved from princess to prisoner to decorous matron." Valerie Styker , New York Times Book Review "Gripping....providing new insights into a misunderstood and tragic figure and showing us the real human buffeted by all those historical crosscurrents." Martin Rubin, Washington Times "A fascinating, readable, and engrossing book that should interest general readers and scholars alike." Library Journal,starred review "This highly detailed, exhaustively researched, often riveting account will appeal especially to all those readers who've immersed themselves in the many recent books about Marie Antoinette" Booklist, starred review "Relates the dramatic highs and lows experienced by the woman known as "Madame Royale"....highly detailed and sympathetic." Publishers Weekly "Enlivened by intriguing asides about the young Marie-Therese, such as the special sign language she developed to communicate with her parents in prison and the impact on her own development of her mother's bravery in the face of the French Revolution." Kirkus Reviews "Masterly and compelling...a triumph." Tina Brown, author of the Diana Chronicles "Few historical tales can match the family drama of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. Beheaded in 1793 during the French Revolution, they left behind a daughter, Marie-Therese, who did everything she could to help restore the Bourbons to the throne. Author Susan Nagel puts to rest most of the doubts about the Bourbons (Was Therese the legitimate daughter? Did her brother the dauphin really die in Temple Prison?) via a thorough analysis of DNA samples and handwriting in family letters. But the best part of the tale isn't the clarification of the historical record--it's the engaging portrait Nagel paints of a young woman who gave up everything for the love of France and her family." Virtuoso Life "Taking one of those fascinating lives that have remained too long untold, Susan Nagel's Marie-Thereseis a well-researched, entertaining and often poignant biography that recreates royalty, terror, tragedy, revolution, and restoration with verve and vividness." Simon Sebag Montefiore, author of Young Stalinand Stalin: The Court of the Red Star
"Masterly and compelling... a triumph." --Tina Brown, author of "The Diana Chronicles" "A powerful story told with wonderful verve: a triumph." -Amanda Foreman, author of "Georgiana: Duchess of Devonshire" "This highly detailed, exhaustively researched, often riveting account will appeal especially to all those readers who've immersed themselves in the many recent books about Marie Antoinette." --"Booklist," starred review "Taking one of those fascinating lives that have remained too long untold, Susan Nagel's Marie-Therese is a well-researched, entertaining and often poignant biography that recreates royalty, terror, tragedy, revolution, and restoration with verve and vividness."--Simon Sebag Montefiore, author of "Young Stalin" and "Stalin: The Court of the Red Star" "If there is a more fascinating or unbelievable life than the one led by Marie-Therese-Charlotte, Marie Antoinette's sole surviving child, I certainly am not familiar with it. In this lively, gripping new biography, Susan Nagel recounts Marie-Therese-Charlotte's roller-coaster itinerary from a revolutionary prison, where she spent three years of her girlhood, to the throne of Restoration France, where she reigned for a mere twenty minutes. Royal orphan and republican bete noire, the subject of fervent monarchist adoration and the object obsessive conspiracy theories, this princess emerges in Nagel's telling as one of the nineteenth century's most captivating heroines. A must-read for lovers of French history and royal biography alike."--Caroline Weber, author of "QUEEN OF FASHION: WHAT MARIE ANTOINETTE WORE TO THE REVOLUTION"
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Publishers Weekly, December 2007
Library Journal, January 2008
Booklist, February 2008
New York Times Full Text Review, October 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The first major biography of one of France's most mysterious women--Marie Antoinette's only child to survive the revolution. Susan Nagel, author of the critically acclaimed biography Mistress of the Elgin Marbles, turns her attention to the life of a remarkable woman who both defined and shaped an era, the tumultuous last days of the crumbling ancien régime. Nagel brings the formidable Marie-Thérèse to life, along with the age of revolution and the waning days of the aristocracy, in a page-turning biography that will appeal to fans of Antonia Fraser's Marie Antoinetteand Amanda Foreman's Georgiana: Duchess of Devonshire. In December 1795, at midnight on her seventeenth birthday, Marie-Thérèse, the only surviving child of Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI, escaped from Paris's notorious Temple Prison. To this day many believe that the real Marie-Thérèse, traumatized following her family's brutal execution during the Reign of Terror, switched identities with an illegitimate half sister who was often mistaken for her twin. Was the real Marie-Thérèse spirited away to a remote castle to live her life as the woman called "the Dark Countess," while an imposter played her role on the political stage of Europe? Now, two hundred years later, using handwriting samples, DNA testing, and an undiscovered cache of Bourbon family letters, Nagel finally solves this mystery. She tells the remarkable story in full and draws a vivid portrait of an astonishing woman who both defined and shaped an era. Marie-Thérèse's deliberate choice of husbands determined the map of nineteenth-century Europe. Even Napoleon was in awe and called her "the only man in the family." Nagel's gripping narrative captures the events of her fascinating life from her very public birth in front of the rowdy crowds and her precocious childhood to her hideous time in prison and her later reincarnation in the public eye as a saint, and, above all, her fierce loyalty to France throughout.
Long Description
The first major biography of one of France's most mysterious women--Marie Antoinette's only child to survive the revolution. Susan Nagel, author of the critically acclaimed biography "Mistress of the Elgin Marbles," turns her attention to the life of a remarkable woman who both defined and shaped an era, the tumultuous last days of the crumbling "ancien regime," Nagel brings the formidable Marie-Therese to life, along with the age of revolution and the waning days of the aristocracy, in a page-turning biography that will appeal to fans of Antonia Fraser's "Marie Antoinette" and Amanda Foreman's "Georgiana: Duchess of Devonshire," In December 1795, at midnight on her seventeenth birthday, Marie-Therese, the only surviving child of Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI, escaped from Paris's notorious Temple Prison. To this day many believe that the real Marie-Therese, traumatized following her family's brutal execution during the Reign of Terror, switched identities with an illegitimate half sister who was often mistaken for her twin. Was the real Marie-Therese spirited away to a remote castle to live her life as the woman called "the Dark Countess," while an imposter played her role on the political stage of Europe? Now, two hundred years later, using handwriting samples, DNA testing, and an undiscovered cache of Bourbon family letters, Nagel finally solves this mystery. She tells the remarkable story in full and draws a vivid portrait of an astonishing woman who both defined and shaped an era. Marie-Therese's deliberate choice of husbands determined the map of nineteenth-century Europe. Even Napoleon was in awe and called her "the only man in the family." Nagel's gripping narrativecaptures the events of her fascinating life from her very public birth in front of the rowdy crowds and her precocious childhood to her hideous time in prison and her later reincarnation in the public eye as a saint, and, above all, her fierce loyalty to France throughout.
Main Description
The first major biography of one of France's most mysterious women--Marie Antoinette's only child to survive the revolution. Susan Nagel, author of the critically acclaimed biographyMistress of the Elgin Marbles, turns her attention to the life of a remarkable woman who both defined and shaped an era, the tumultuous last days of the crumblingancien régime. Nagel brings the formidable Marie-Thérèse to life, along with the age of revolution and the waning days of the aristocracy, in a page-turning biography that will appeal to fans of Antonia Fraser'sMarie Antoinetteand Amanda Foreman'sGeorgiana: Duchess of Devonshire. In December 1795, at midnight on her seventeenth birthday, Marie-Thérèse, the only surviving child of Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI, escaped from Paris's notorious Temple Prison. To this day many believe that the real Marie-Thérèse, traumatized following her family's brutal execution during the Reign of Terror, switched identities with an illegitimate half sister who was often mistaken for her twin. Was the real Marie-Thérèse spirited away to a remote castle to live her life as the woman called "the Dark Countess," while an imposter played her role on the political stage of Europe? Now, two hundred years later, using handwriting samples, DNA testing, and an undiscovered cache of Bourbon family letters, Nagel finally solves this mystery. She tells the remarkable story in full and draws a vivid portrait of an astonishing woman who both defined and shaped an era. Marie-Thérèse's deliberate choice of husbands determined the map of nineteenth-century Europe. Even Napoleon was in awe and called her "the only man in the family." Nagel's gripping narrative captures the events of her fascinating life from her very public birth in front of the rowdy crowds and her precocious childhood to her hideous time in prison and her later reincarnation in the public eye as a saint, and, above all, her fierce loyalty to France throughout.
Main Description
The first major biography of one of France's most mysterious womenMarie Antoinette's only child to survive the revolution. Susan Nagel, author of the critically acclaimed biographyMistress of the Elgin Marbles, turns her attention to the life of a remarkable woman who both defined and shaped an era, the tumultuous last days of the crumblingancien regime. Nagel brings the formidable Marie-Therese to life, along with the age of revolution and the waning days of the aristocracy, in a page-turning biography that will appeal to fans of Antonia Fraser'sMarie Antoinetteand Amanda Foreman'sGeorgiana: Duchess of Devonshire. In December 1795, at midnight on her seventeenth birthday, Marie-Therese, the only surviving child of Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI, escaped from Paris's notorious Temple Prison. To this day many believe that the real Marie-Therese, traumatized following her family's brutal execution during the Reign of Terror, switched identities with an illegitimate half sister who was often mistaken for her twin. Was the real Marie-Therese spirited away to a remote castle to live her life as the woman called "the Dark Countess," while an imposter played her role on the political stage of Europe? Now, two hundred years later, using handwriting samples, DNA testing, and an undiscovered cache of Bourbon family letters, Nagel finally solves this mystery. She tells the remarkable story in full and draws a vivid portrait of an astonishing woman who both defined and shaped an era. Marie-Therese's deliberate choice of husbands determined the map of nineteenth-century Europe. Even Napoleon was in awe and called her "the only man in the family." Nagel's gripping narrative captures the events of her fascinating life from her very public birth in front of the rowdy crowds and her precocious childhood to her hideous time in prison and her later reincarnation in the public eye as a saint, and, above all, her fierce loyalty to France throughout.
Main Description
The first major biography of one of France's most mysterious women--Marie Antoinette's only child to survive the revolution. Susan Nagel, author of the critically acclaimed biography Mistress of the Elgin Marbles, turns her attention to the life of a remarkable woman who both defined and shaped an era, the tumultuous last days of the crumbling ancien r gime. Nagel brings the formidable Marie-Th r se to life, along with the age of revolution and the waning days of the aristocracy, in a page-turning biography that will appeal to fans of Antonia Fraser's Marie Antoinetteand Amanda Foreman's Georgiana: Duchess of Devonshire. In December 1795, at midnight on her seventeenth birthday, Marie-Th r se, the only surviving child of Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI, escaped from Paris's notorious Temple Prison. To this day many believe that the real Marie-Th r se, traumatized following her family's brutal execution during the Reign of Terror, switched identities with an illegitimate half sister who was often mistaken for her twin. Was the real Marie-Th r se spirited away to a remote castle to live her life as the woman called "the Dark Countess," while an imposter played her role on the political stage of Europe? Now, two hundred years later, using handwriting samples, DNA testing, and an undiscovered cache of Bourbon family letters, Nagel finally solves this mystery. She tells the remarkable story in full and draws a vivid portrait of an astonishing woman who both defined and shaped an era. Marie-Th r se's deliberate choice of husbands determined the map of nineteenth-century Europe. Even Napoleon was in awe and called her "the only man in the family." Nagel's gripping narrative captures the events of her fascinating life from her very public birth in front of the rowdy crowds and her precocious childhood to her hideous time in prison and her later reincarnation in the public eye as a saint, and, above all, her fierce loyalty to France throughout.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Chronology
Family Trees
Map
Sinner
Sex and Politicsp. 3
Child of Francep. 20
Playmatesp. 33
Once upon a Timep. 43
Storm Clouds over the Palacep. 53
The End of the Fairy Talep. 70
A New Homep. 83
A Dangerous Gamep. 100
The Losing Sidep. 111
Two Orphansp. 123
Sole Survivorp. 145
Saint
Every Inch a Princessp. 163
Viennap. 176
The Emigresp. 186
The Birth of a Strategistp. 198
A Bridep. 207
The New Antigonep. 218
Country Lifep. 236
The Only Man in the Familyp. 250
Restorationp. 270
Birth, Death and a New Dauphinep. 284
Mending Fencesp. 299
Suspicions Confirmedp. 318
Blackmailp. 332
Queen of Francep. 349
The Matriarchp. 357
Afterwordp. 367
Notesp. 377
Bibliographyp. 383
Indexp. 393
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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