Catalogue

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Dostoevsky's democracy /
Nancy Ruttenburg.
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2008.
description
xii, 275 p. : ill.
ISBN
9780691136141 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2008.
isbn
9780691136141 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction: Dostoevsky's democracy -- Building out the house of the dead: part I -- Building out the house of the dead: part II -- Conclusion: the Russian people, this unriddled sphinx.
catalogue key
6515310
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Drawing on contemporary criticism, Dostoevsky's own prison experience, and his later masterpiece novels, this provocative book inquires into the great Russian writer's 'sense of the demos'--in equal parts mystical, traumatic, and inspirational. A fascinating narrative."--Caryl Emerson, Princeton University "This elegant and deeply argued book offers a major revision of the standard narrative of Dostoevsky's postexile emergence as a convert to Orthodoxy and conservative nationalism. Nancy Ruttenburg presents a provocative and persuasive reading of Dostoevsky's first novel,Notes from the House of the Dead, situating it as the wellspring of his particular form of utopian Russian populism."--Dale E. Peterson, Amherst College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[A] scholarly and well-written work. . . . Its strengths are its erudition, sophisticated exploration of narrative technique and application of a range of conceptual models to literary contexts. . . . [A]n excellent and original study of Notes from the House of the Dead which makes a real contribution to our understanding of this unique work."-- Robert Reid, European Legacy
Dostoevsky's Democracybrims with surprising insights.
" Dostoevsky's Democracy brims with surprising insights."-- Robin Feuer Miller, Slavic Review
Dostoevsky's Democracy brims with surprising insights. -- Robin Feuer Miller, Slavic Review
Dostoevsky's Democracybrims with surprising insights. -- Robin Feuer Miller, Slavic Review
" Dostoevsky's Democracy provides a plausible and open reading that challenges us to re-experience familiar texts."-- Lawrence Mansozo, Slavic and East European Journal
Dostoevsky's Democracywill be read both by literary scholars, and those interested in the history of ideas.
" Dostoevskys Democracy will be read both by literary scholars, and those interested in the history of ideas."-- Lesley Chamberlain, Times Literary Supplement
Dostoevsky's Democracy will be read both by literary scholars, and those interested in the history of ideas. -- Lesley Chamberlain, Times Literary Supplement
Dostoevsky's Democracywill be read both by literary scholars, and those interested in the history of ideas. -- Lesley Chamberlain, Times Literary Supplement
Nancy Ruttenburg offers a major reinterpretation of Dostoevsky's life and work by re-examining the crucial transitional period between the early works of the 1840s and the important novels of the 1860s.
"Nancy Ruttenburg offers a major reinterpretation of Dostoevskys life and work by re-examining the crucial transitional period between the early works of the 1840s and the important novels of the 1860s."-- Times Higher Education
Nancy Ruttenburg offers a major reinterpretation of Dostoevsky's life and work by re-examining the crucial transitional period between the early works of the 1840s and the important novels of the 1860s. -- Times Higher Education
Drawing on contemporary criticism, Dostoevsky's own prison experience, and his later masterpiece novels, this provocative book inquires into the great Russian writer's 'sense of the demos'--in equal parts mystical, traumatic, and inspirational. A fascinating narrative.
This elegant and deeply argued book offers a major revision of the standard narrative of Dostoevsky's postexile emergence as a convert to Orthodoxy and conservative nationalism. Nancy Ruttenburg presents a provocative and persuasive reading of Dostoevsky's first novel,Notes from the House of the Dead, situating it as the wellspring of his particular form of utopian Russian populism.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"Drawing on contemporary criticism, Dostoevsky's own prison experience, and his later masterpiece novels, this provocative book inquires into the great Russian writer's 'sense of the demos'--in equal parts mystical, traumatic, and inspirational. A fascinating narrative."-- Caryl Emerson, Princeton University "This elegant and deeply argued book offers a major revision of the standard narrative of Dostoevsky's postexile emergence as a convert to Orthodoxy and conservative nationalism. Nancy Ruttenburg presents a provocative and persuasive reading of Dostoevsky's first novel, Notes from the House of the Dead , situating it as the wellspring of his particular form of utopian Russian populism."-- Dale E. Peterson, Amherst College
Back Cover Copy
"Drawing on contemporary criticism, Dostoevsky's own prison experience, and his later masterpiece novels, this provocative book inquires into the great Russian writer's 'sense of the demos'--in equal parts mystical, traumatic, and inspirational. A fascinating narrative."--Caryl Emerson, Princeton University "This elegant and deeply argued book offers a major revision of the standard narrative of Dostoevsky's postexile emergence as a convert to Orthodoxy and conservative nationalism. Nancy Ruttenburg presents a provocative and persuasive reading of Dostoevsky's first novel, Notes from the House of the Dead , situating it as the wellspring of his particular form of utopian Russian populism."--Dale E. Peterson, Amherst College
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Dostoevsky's Democracy' offers a revisionary account of the life and work of the Russian writer by examining the transitional period between the early works of the 1840s and the great novels of the 1860s. In particular, the book looks at how Dostoevsky's experience in a forced labour camp changed his beliefs and influenced his work.
Main Description
Dostoevsky's Democracyoffers a major reinterpretation of the life and work of the great Russian writer by closely reexamining the crucial transitional period between the early works of the 1840s and the important novels of the 1860s. Sentenced to death in 1849 for utopian socialist political activity, the 28-year-old Dostoevsky was subjected to a mock execution and then exiled to Siberia for a decade, including four years in a forced labor camp, where he experienced a crisis of belief. It has been influentially argued that the result of this crisis was a conversion to Russian Orthodoxy and reactionary politics. ButDostoevsky's Democracychallenges this view through a close investigation of Dostoevsky's Siberian decade and its most important work, the autobiographical novelNotes from the House of the Dead(1861). Nancy Ruttenburg argues that Dostoevsky's crisis was set off by his encounter with common Russians in the labor camp, an experience that led to an intense artistic meditation on what he would call Russian "democratism." By tracing the effects of this crisis,Dostoevsky's Democracypresents a new understanding of Dostoevsky's aesthetic and political development and his role in shaping Russian modernity itself, especially in relation to the preeminent political event of his time, peasant emancipation.
Main Description
Dostoevsky's Democracy offers a major reinterpretation of the life and work of the great Russian writer by closely reexamining the crucial transitional period between the early works of the 1840s and the important novels of the 1860s. Sentenced to death in 1849 for utopian socialist political activity, the 28-year-old Dostoevsky was subjected to a mock execution and then exiled to Siberia for a decade, including four years in a forced labor camp, where he experienced a crisis of belief. It has been influentially argued that the result of this crisis was a conversion to Russian Orthodoxy and reactionary politics. But Dostoevsky's Democracy challenges this view through a close investigation of Dostoevsky's Siberian decade and its most important work, the autobiographical novel Notes from the House of the Dead (1861). Nancy Ruttenburg argues that Dostoevsky's crisis was set off by his encounter with common Russians in the labor camp, an experience that led to an intense artistic meditation on what he would call Russian "democratism." By tracing the effects of this crisis, Dostoevsky's Democracy presents a new understanding of Dostoevsky's aesthetic and political development and his role in shaping Russian modernity itself, especially in relation to the preeminent political event of his time, peasant emancipation.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
The Image of the Beastp. 1
The Ne To and the "Democrat"p. 6
The Ne To, the Writer, and the Peoplep. 21
Building Out the House of the Deadp. 29
"Why Is This Man Alive?": The Unconsummated Conversionp. 31
The Disarticulation of the Autobiographical Selfp. 41
Opposites That Do Not Attract (The Bezdna and Poetic Truth) and Opposites That Do (Estrangement and Conversion)p. 50
The Dostoevskian "As If": Self-Deception in Autobiographyp. 61
The Narrator's Eclipsep. 72
Dostoevsky's Poetics of Convictionp. 82
Building Out the House of the Deadp. 91
The Chronotope of Katorgap. 93
Exception, Equality, Emancipationp. 96
Ontological Ambiguity in the Space of Exception: Katorga as Mediump. 105
The Ontology of Crime: Testimony/Confessionp. 115
The Flesh of the Politicalp. 140
The Grammar of Katorgap. 141
Corporeality and Intercorporeality in Katorgap. 153
Dostoevsky's Democratic Aestheticp. 160
Conclusionp. 170
The Russian People, This Unriddled Sphinxp. 170
Carmen Horrendump. 170
Bookishness, Literacy, and Becoming Democraticp. 176
Where Have All the Peasants Gone?p. 183
Notesp. 197
Bibliographyp. 251
Indexp. 263
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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