Catalogue


Caribbean culture and British fiction in the Atlantic world, 1780-1870 /
Tim Watson.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, c2008.
description
xv, 263 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521876265 (hbk.), 9780521876261 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, c2008.
isbn
0521876265 (hbk.)
9780521876261 (hbk.)
catalogue key
6511484
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...some may argue against his reliance on imperial archives, he makes a commendable effort to read them against the grain and fill in some of the historical gaps that have hitherto been ignored." -CHANDANI PATEL,University of Chicago
'... undertaking very demanding archival work, and thus reconstructing the world behind the words of these many writers and speakers, Tim Watson has done a service for scholars of the Atlantic world.' Laura Doyle, University of Massachusetts-Amherst
"Watson admirably negotiates between historical methodologies and literary criticism...In a move that nicely foregrounds the transatlantic dimension of his study, [he] concludes with an epilogue describing the transitional power relations in the Caribbean during the late nineteenth century....[he] ends his fine study with a reminder of the crucial role that Jamaica played in the politics of the Caribbean, Britain, and even the United States during the period examined in his book." -Susan Hall, H-Net Reviews. July, 2011
"...Watson's book makes an impressive contribution to scholarship on these works." -Susan Hall,Cameron University
"Watson's study thus eloquently heeds its own caution: instead of reproducing the paranoid fantasies of white Creole slave masters and metropolitan abolitionists alike who saw slave conspiracies at every turn, scholars might limn a more realistic and less romantic-and thus balanced-interpretation of the mutually constitutive dynamic between Caribbean culture and British fiction across the nineteenth-century Atlantic world." -Sean X. Goudie,Pennsylvania State University
Review of the hardback: '... undertaking very demanding archival work, and thus reconstructing the world behind the words of these many writers and speakers, Tim Watson has done a service for scholars of the Atlantic world.' Laura Doyle, University of Massachusetts-Amherst
"While his book is part of the Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture series, Watson goes on to provide as much if not more a history of the nineteenth-century Caribbean, with an impressive immersion in colonial documents, missionary archives, local newspapers, and pamphlets to capture the quotidian details of a world in transformation." -John M. Picker,Massachusetts Institute of Technology
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Tim Watson challenges the idea that Caribbean colonies in the 19th century were outposts of empire easily relegated to the realm of tropical romance while the real story took place in Britain.
Description for Bookstore
Combines literary criticism and historical analysis, examining a wide range of sources to rescue the stories of ordinary black Jamaicans and traveling African Americans from historical obscurity. At the same time, the book uses canonical fiction to show how crucial Caribbean culture was in the development of British fiction.
Main Description
Tim Watson challenges the idea that Caribbean colonies in the nineteenth century were outposts of empire easily relegated to the realm of tropical romance while the real story took place in Britain. Analyzing pamphlets, newspapers, estate papers, trial transcripts, and missionary correspondence, this book recovers stories of ordinary West Indians, enslaved and free, as they made places for themselves in the empire and the Atlantic world, from the time of sugar tycoon Simon Taylor to the perspective of Samuel Ringgold Ward, African American eyewitness to the 1865 Morant Bay rebellion. With readings of Maria Edgeworth and George Eliot, the book argues that the Caribbean occupied a prominent place in the development of English realism. However, Watson shows too that we must sometimes turn to imperial romance - which made protagonists of rebels and religious leaders, as in Hamel, the Obeah Man (1827) - to understand the realities of Caribbean cultural life.
Description for Bookstore
Combines literary criticism and historical analysis, examining a wide range of sources to rescue the stories of ordinary black Jamaicans and travelling African Americans from historical obscurity. At the same time, the book uses canonical fiction to show how crucial Caribbean culture was in the development of British fiction.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. x
Acknowledgementsp. xii
Introduction: realism and romance in the nineteenth-century Caribbeanp. 1
Creole realism and metropolitan humanitarianismp. 17
Caribbean romance and subaltern historyp. 66
'This fruitful matrix of curses': the interesting narrative of the life of Samuel Ringgold Wardp. 104
Jamaica, genealogy, George Eliot: inheriting the empire after Morant Bayp. 154
Epilogue: 'And the sword will come from America'p. 187
Notesp. 201
Bibliographyp. 243
Indexp. 258
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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