Catalogue


Dostoevsky : language, faith, and fiction /
Rowan Williams.
imprint
Waco, Tex. : Baylor University Press, c2008.
description
xiv, 290 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1602581452 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9781602581456 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Waco, Tex. : Baylor University Press, c2008.
isbn
1602581452 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9781602581456 (hbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Christ against the truth? -- Devils : being towards death -- The last word? : dialogue and recognition -- Exchanging crosses : responsibility for all -- Sacrilege and revelation : the broken image.
catalogue key
6478949
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 269-277) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Rowan Williams takes us on a journey through literary art... -N. T. Wright
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-02-01:
Williams (Archbishop of Canterbury) takes an explicitly, exclusively Christian approach to Dostoevsky's oeuvre. Combating the interpretation of Dostoevsky as preoccupied with the tension between belief and nonbelief, he argues the work is first and foremost a direct reflection of Dostoevsky's personal faith, each text having as its main goal the assertion of personal freedom within the supreme authority of God and the church. Williams claims that Dostoevsky viewed the act of writing as analogous to the act of divine creation and articulated freedom specifically through language--participating in creation through authorship, just as characters do through their individual speech acts. The demonic in Dostoevsky is that which is beyond language. Williams expounds the way in which, while still under the influence of the force, characters such as Raskolnikov, Stavrogin, and the Underground man obscure the reader's understanding through convoluted language. Williams concludes that these self-isolated characters grow progressively more intelligible over the course of the texts--a direct result of their coming to terms with freedom and responsibility for language, understanding speech no longer as personal property but as an integral part of a greater reality. This work offers solely a Christian understanding of Dostoevsky's work and does not entertain alternative readings. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. A. J. DeBlasio University of Pittsburgh
Reviews
Review Quotes
After reading WilliamsÂ’ book, we return to Dostoevsky with new insight on what it means to be human.-N. T. Wright, Bishop of Durham
After reading Williams' book, we return to Dostoevsky with new insight on what it means to be human. -N. T. Wright, Bishop of Durham
This item was reviewed in:
Guardian UK, September 2008
Choice, February 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Rowan Williams explores the intricacies of speech, fiction, metaphor, and iconography in the works of one of literature's most complex, and most complexly misunderstood, authors. Williams' investigation focuses on the four major novels of Dostoevsky's maturity ( Crime and Punishment , The Idiot , Devils , and The Brothers Karamozov ). He argues that understanding Dostoevsky's style and goals as a writer of fiction is inseparable from understanding his religious commitments. Any reader who enters the rich and insightful world of Williams' Dostoevsky will emerge a more thoughtful and appreciative reader for it.
Main Description
Rowan Williams explores the intricacies of speech, fiction, metaphor, and iconography in the works of one of literature's most complex, and most complexly misunderstood, authors. Williams' investigation focuses on the four major novels of Dostoevsky's maturity (Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, Devils, and The Brothers Karamozov). He argues that understanding Dostoevsky's style and goals as a writer of fiction is inseparable from understanding his religious commitments. Any reader who enters the rich and insightful world of Williams' Dostoevsky will emerge a more thoughtful and appreciative reader for it.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Rowan Williams explores the beauty and intricacies of speech, fiction, metaphor, and iconography in the works of Dostoevsky, one of literature's most complex, and most misunderstood, authors.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Christ against the Truth?p. 15
Devils: Being toward Deathp. 63
The Last Word? Dialogue and Recognitionp. 111
Exchanging Crosses: Responsibility for Allp. 151
Sacrilege and Revelation: The Broken Imagep. 189
Conclusionp. 227
Notesp. 245
Bibliographyp. 269
Indexp. 279
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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