Catalogue


The boy who dared /
Susan Campbell Bartoletti.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Scholastic Press, 2008.
description
202 p. : ill., map ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0439680131, 9780439680134
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Scholastic Press, 2008.
isbn
0439680131
9780439680134
abstract
In October, 1942, seventeen-year-old Helmuth Hübener, imprisoned for distributing anti-Nazi leaflets, recalls his past life and how he came to dedicate himself to bring the truth about Hitler and the war to the German people.
catalogue key
6474409
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 199-202).
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Beehive Young Adults' Book Award, USA, 2012 : Nominated
Golden Sower Award, USA, 2010 - 2011 : Nominated
Iowa Teen Award, USA, 2010 - 2011 : Nominated
SCASL Book Award (South Carolina), USA, 2009 - 2010 : Nominated
Sunshine State Young Reader's Book Award, USA, 2010 - 2011 : Nominated
Volunteer State Book Award, USA, 2010 - 2011 : Nominated
Young Hoosier Book Award, USA, 2010 - 2011 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2008-02-11:
Returning to material she uncovered while researching Hitler Youth, Bartoletti offers a fictionalized biography of Helmuth Hubener, a Hamburg teenager who, in February 1942, was arrested for writing and distributing leaflets that denounced Hitler. Almost nine months later, on October 27, at the age of 17, Hubener was executed for treason. Opening her story on Hubener's last day, Bartoletti frames the work as third-person flashbacks, casting over the narrative a terrible sense of doom even as she escalates the tension. She does an excellent job of conveying the political climate surrounding Hitler's ascent to power, seamlessly integrating a complex range of socioeconomic conditions into her absorbing drama of Helmuth and his fatherless family. The author also convincingly shows how Helmuth originally embraces Hitler. His disillusionment seems to come a little too easily; American readers may wonder why Helmuth's reactions were not more common. But that question resolves itself as the author exposes the chilling gap between her own admiration for her subject and reflections, discussed in an afterword, from those who knew Helmuth, as in this comment from his older brother: "He should have known better than that.... A sixteen-year-old boy cannot change the government." Ages 11-up. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
In Hitler Youth: Growing Up in Hitler's Shadow, Booklist's 2005 Top of the ListNonfiction for youth, Bartoletti included a portrait of Helmuth Hübener, a German teenager executed for his resistance to the Nazis. In this fictionalized biography, she imagines his story, as he sits in prison awaiting execution in 1942 and remembers his childhood in Hamburg during Hitler's rise to power. Beaten and tortured to name his friends, he remembers how he started off an ardent Nazi follower and then began to question his patriotism, secretly listened to BBC radio broadcasts, and finally dared to write and distribute pamphlets calling for resistance. The teen's perspective, and makes this a particularly gripping way to personalize the history, and even those unfamiliar with the background Bartoletti weave in herethe German bitterness after World War I, the burning of the books, the raging anti-Semitismwill be held by story of one boy's heroic resistance in the worst of times. A lengthy author's note distinguishes fact from fiction, and Bartoletti provides a detailed chronology, a bibliography, and many black-and-white photos of Helmuth with friends, family and members of his Mormon church. The is an important title for the Holocaust curriculum.. See the Booklist interview with Bartoletti in the January 1, 2006 issue, in which she discusses how this teen's story moved her. - Hazel Rochman, Booklist, February 15, 2008
In Hitler Youth: Growing Up in Hitler’s Shadow, Booklist’s 2005 Top of the List–Nonfiction for youth, Bartoletti included a portrait of Helmuth H bener, a German teenager executed for his resistance to the Nazis. In this fictionalized biography, she imagines his story, as he sits in prison awaiting execution in 1942 and remembers his childhood in Hamburg during Hitler’s rise to power. Beaten and tortured to name his friends, he remembers how he started off an ardent Nazi follower and then began to question his patriotism, secretly listened to BBC radio broadcasts, and finally dared to write and distribute pamphlets calling for resistance. The teen’s perspective, and makes this a particularly gripping way to personalize the history, and even those unfamiliar with the background Bartoletti weave in here–the German bitterness after World War I, the burning of the books, the raging anti-Semitism––will be held by story of one boy’s heroic resistance in the worst of times. A lengthy author’s note distinguishes fact from fiction, and Bartoletti provides a detailed chronology, a bibliography, and many black-and-white photos of Helmuth with friends, family and members of his Mormon church. The is an important title for the Holocaust curriculum.. See the Booklist interview with Bartoletti in the January 1, 2006 issue, in which she discusses how this teen’s story moved her. - Hazel Rochman, Booklist, February 15, 2008
Returning to material she uncovered while researching Hitler Youth, Bartoletti offers a fictionalized biography of Helmuth Hu00fcbener, a Hamburg teenager who, in February 1942, was arrested for writing and distributing leaflets that denounced Hitler. Almost nine months later, on October 27, at the age of 17, Hu00fcbener was executed for treason. Opening her story on Hu00fcbener's last day, Bartoletti frames the work as third-person flashbacks, casting over the narrative a terrible sense of doom even as she escalates the tension. She does an excellent job of conveying the political climate surrounding Hitler's ascent to power, seamlessly integrating a complex range of socioeconomic conditions into her absorbing drama of Helmuth and his fatherless family. The author also convincingly shows how Helmuth originally embraces Hitler. His disillusionment seems to come a little too easily; American readers may wonder why Helmuth's reactions were not more common. But that question resolves itself as the author exposes the chilling gap between her own admiration for her subject and reflections, discussed in an afterword, from those who knew Helmuth, as in this comment from his older brother: u201cHe should have known better than that.... A sixteen-year-old boy cannot change the government.u201d Ages 11-up. (Feb.) - Publishers Weekly, February 11, 2008
Returning to material she uncovered while researching Hitler Youth, Bartoletti offers a fictionalized biography of Helmuth H bener, a Hamburg teenager who, in February 1942, was arrested for writing and distributing leaflets that denounced Hitler. Almost nine months later, on October 27, at the age of 17, H bener was executed for treason. Opening her story on H bener's last day, Bartoletti frames the work as third-person flashbacks, casting over the narrative a terrible sense of doom even as she escalates the tension. She does an excellent job of conveying the political climate surrounding Hitler's ascent to power, seamlessly integrating a complex range of socioeconomic conditions into her absorbing drama of Helmuth and his fatherless family. The author also convincingly shows how Helmuth originally embraces Hitler. His disillusionment seems to come a little too easily; American readers may wonder why Helmuth's reactions were not more common. But that question resolves itself as the author exposes the chilling gap between her own admiration for her subject and reflections, discussed in an afterword, from those who knew Helmuth, as in this comment from his older brother: “He should have known better than that.... A sixteen-year-old boy cannot change the government.” Ages 11-up. (Feb.) - Publishers Weekly, February 11, 2008
Returning to material she uncovered while researching Hitler Youth, Bartoletti offers a fictionalized biography of Helmuth Hübener, a Hamburg teenager who, in February 1942, was arrested for writing and distributing leaflets that denounced Hitler. Almost nine months later, on October 27, at the age of 17, Hübener was executed for treason. Opening her story on Hübener's last day, Bartoletti frames the work as third-person flashbacks, casting over the narrative a terrible sense of doom even as she escalates the tension. She does an excellent job of conveying the political climate surrounding Hitler's ascent to power, seamlessly integrating a complex range of socioeconomic conditions into her absorbing drama of Helmuth and his fatherless family. The author also convincingly shows how Helmuth originally embraces Hitler. His disillusionment seems to come a little too easily; American readers may wonder why Helmuth's reactions were not more common. But that question resolves itself as the author exposes the chilling gap between her own admiration for her subject and reflections, discussed in an afterword, from those who knew Helmuth, as in this comment from his older brother: "He should have known better than that.... A sixteen-year-old boy cannot change the government." Ages 11-up. (Feb.) - Publishers Weekly, February 11, 2008
In Hitler Youth: Growing Up in Hitleru2019s Shadow, Booklistu2019s 2005 Top of the ListNonfiction for youth, Bartoletti included a portrait of Helmuth Hu00fcbener, a German teenager executed for his resistance to the Nazis. In this fictionalized biography, she imagines his story, as he sits in prison awaiting execution in 1942 and remembers his childhood in Hamburg during Hitleru2019s rise to power. Beaten and tortured to name his friends, he remembers how he started off an ardent Nazi follower and then began to question his patriotism, secretly listened to BBC radio broadcasts, and finally dared to write and distribute pamphlets calling for resistance. The teenu2019s perspective, and makes this a particularly gripping way to personalize the history, and even those unfamiliar with the background Bartoletti weave in herethe German bitterness after World War I, the burning of the books, the raging anti-Semitismwill be held by story of one boyu2019s heroic resistance in the worst of times. A lengthy authoru2019s note distinguishes fact from fiction, and Bartoletti provides a detailed chronology, a bibliography, and many black-and-white photos of Helmuth with friends, family and members of his Mormon church. The is an important title for the Holocaust curriculum.. See the Booklist interview with Bartoletti in the January 1, 2006 issue, in which she discusses how this teenu2019s story moved her. - Hazel Rochman, Booklist, February 15, 2008
In Hitler Youth: Growing Up in Hitler's Shadow, Booklist's 2005 Top of the List-Nonfiction for youth, Bartoletti included a portrait of Helmuth Hbener, a German teenager executed for his resistance to the Nazis. In this fictionalized biography, she imagines his story, as he sits in prison awaiting execution in 1942 and remembers his childhood in Hamburg during Hitler's rise to power. Beaten and tortured to name his friends, he remembers how he started off an ardent Nazi follower and then began to question his patriotism, secretly listened to BBC radio broadcasts, and finally dared to write and distribute pamphlets calling for resistance. The teen's perspective, and makes this a particularly gripping way to personalize the history, and even those unfamiliar with the background Bartoletti weave in here-the German bitterness after World War I, the burning of the books, the raging anti-Semitism--will be held by story of one boy's heroic resistance in the worst of times. A lengthy author's note distinguishes fact from fiction, and Bartoletti provides a detailed chronology, a bibliography, and many black-and-white photos of Helmuth with friends, family and members of his Mormon church. The is an important title for the Holocaust curriculum.. See the Booklist interview with Bartoletti in the January 1, 2006 issue, in which she discusses how this teen's story moved her. -- Hazel Rochman, Booklist, February 15, 2008
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Booklist, February 2008
Publishers Weekly, February 2008
Voice of Youth Advocates, April 2008
School Library Journal, May 2008
Horn Book Guide, June 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Just as the Nazis are rising to power, Helmuth Hübener, aGerman schoolboy, is caught up in all the swashbucklingbravado of his time.The handsome storm trooper uniforms, the shiny jackbootsand armbands, the rousing patriotism -- all serve to drawhim into this bright new world full of promise and hope.In the beginning, Helmuth's patriotism is unwavering.But every day the rights of people all over Germany arediminishing. Jews are threatened and their businesses arebeing destroyed, the truth has been censored, and dangerlurks everywhere. Anybody can turn on you. The world hasturned upside down: Patriotism means denouncing others,love means to hate, and speaking out means treason. Silencebecomes everyone's guilty secret. How much longer canHelmuth keep silent?Now Helmuth sits in a German prison, awaiting his precariousfate. Told in flashback with breathtaking suspense, thishomage to an extraordinary real-life hero magnificentlyexplores one person's responsibility to humanity, freedom,and truth.
Main Description
Just as the Nazis are rising to power, Helmuth Hübener, aGerman schoolboy, is caught up in all the swashbucklingbravado of his time.The handsome storm trooper uniforms, the shiny jackbootsand armbands, the rousing patriotism — all serve to drawhim into this bright new world full of promise and hope.In the beginning, Helmuth’s patriotism is unwavering.But every day the rights of people all over Germany arediminishing. Jews are threatened and their businesses arebeing destroyed, the truth has been censored, and dangerlurks everywhere. Anybody can turn on you. The world hasturned upside down: Patriotism means denouncing others,love means to hate, and speaking out means treason. Silencebecomes everyone’s guilty secret. How much longer canHelmuth keep silent?Now Helmuth sits in a German prison, awaiting his precariousfate. Told in flashback with breathtaking suspense, thishomage to an extraordinary real-life hero magnificentlyexplores one person’s responsibility to humanity, freedom,and truth.
Main Description
Just as the Nazis are rising to power, Helmuth Hubener, a German schoolboy, is caught up in all the swashbuckling bravado of his time.The handsome storm trooper uniforms, the shiny jackboots and armbands, the rousing patriotism, all serve to draw him into this bright new world full of promise and hope. In the beginning, Helmuth's patriotism is unwavering. But every day the rights of people all over Germany are diminishing. Jews are threatened and their businesses are being destroyed, the truth has been censored, and danger lurks everywhere. Anybody can turn on you. The world has turned upside down: Patriotism means denouncing others, love means to hate and speaking out means treason. Silence becomes everyone's guilty secret. How much longer can Helmuth keep silent? Now Helmuth sits in a German prison, awaiting his precarious fate. Told in flashback with breathtaking suspense, this homage to an extraordinary real-life hero magnificently explores one person's responsibility to humanity, freedom and truth.
Main Description
When 16-year-old Helmut Hubner listens to the BBC news on an illegal short-wave radio, he quickly discovers Germany is lying to its people. But when he tries to expose the truth with leaflets, he's tried for treason. Sentenced to death and waiting in a jail cell, Helmut's story emerges in a series of flashbacks that show his growth from a naive child caught up in the patriotism of the times, to a sensitive and mature young man who thinks for himself.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In October, 1942, 17-year-old Helmuth Hübener, imprisoned for distributing anti-Nazi leaflets, recalls his past life and how he came to dedicate himself to bring the truth about Hitler and the war to the German people.
Library of Congress Summary
In October, 1942, seventeen-year-old Helmuth Hübener, imprisoned for distributing anti-Nazi leaflets recalls his past life and how he came to dedicate himself to bring the truth about Hitler and the war to the German people.
Library of Congress Summary
In October, 1942, seventeen-year-old Helmuth Hübener, imprisoned for distributing anti-Nazi leaflets recalls his past life and how he came to dedicate himself to bring the truth about Hitler and the war to the German people.
Main Description
A Newbery Honor Book author has written a powerful and gripping novel about a youth in Nazi Germany who tells the truth about Hitler Bartoletti has taken one episode from her Newbery Honor Book, HITLER YOUTH, and fleshed it out into thought-provoking novel. When 16-year-old Helmut Hubner listens to the BBC news on an illegal short-wave radio, he quickly discovers Germany is lying to the people. But when he tries to expose the truth with leaflets, he's tried for treason. Sentenced to death and waiting in a jail cell, Helmut's story emerges in a series of flashbacks that show his growth from a naive child caught up in the patriotism of the times , to a sensitive and mature young man who thinks for himself.
Main Description
Bartoletti has taken one episode from her Newbery Honor Book "Hitler Youth" and fleshed it out into thought-provoking novel, telling the story of a 16-year-old German youth who dared to stand up against the Nazis.
Main Description
Bartoletti has taken one episode from her Newbery Honor Book, HITLER YOUTH, and fleshed it out into thought-provoking novel. When 16-year-old Helmuth Hubner listens to the BBC news on an illegal short-wave radio, he quickly discovers Germany is lying to the people. But when he tries to expose the truth with leaflets, he's tried for treason. Sentenced to death and waiting in a jail cell, Helmuth's story emerges in a series of flashbacks that show his growth from a naive child caught up in the patriotism of the times, to a sensitive and mature young man who thinks for himself.
Main Description
Just as the Nazis are rising to power, Helmuth H bener, aGerman schoolboy, is caught up in all the swashbucklingbravado of his time.The handsome storm trooper uniforms, the shiny jackbootsand armbands, the rousing patriotism — all serve to drawhim into this bright new world full of promise and hope.In the beginning, Helmuth's patriotism is unwavering.But every day the rights of people all over Germany arediminishing. Jews are threatened and their businesses arebeing destroyed, the truth has been censored, and dangerlurks everywhere. Anybody can turn on you. The world hasturned upside down: Patriotism means denouncing others,love means to hate, and speaking out means treason. Silencebecomes everyone's guilty secret. How much longer canHelmuth keep silent?Now Helmuth sits in a German prison, awaiting his precariousfate. Told in flashback with breathtaking suspense, thishomage to an extraordinary real-life hero magnificentlyexplores one person's responsibility to humanity, freedom,and truth.
Author Comments
SUSAN CAMPBELL BARTOLETTI's Hitler Youth was named a Newbery Honor Book, and Black Potatoes: TheStory of the Great Irish Famine, 1845 –1850 was awarded the Robert F. Sibert Medal. Ms. Bartoletti lives withher family in Moscow, Pennsylvania.
Author Comments
SUSAN CAMPBELL BARTOLETTI’s Hitler Youth was named a Newbery Honor Book, and Black Potatoes: TheStory of the Great Irish Famine, 1845–1850 was awarded the Robert F. Sibert Medal. Ms. Bartoletti lives withher family in Moscow, Pennsylvania.

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